General Public

Screening of FOUR WINTERS with Q&A by Director | Complexities of Resistance: Partisan Films from Eastern Europe and the Balkans Film Series

Event time: 
Tuesday, April 9, 2024 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
53 Wall Street WALL53, Auditorium See map
53 Wall Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Complexities of Resistance: Partisan Films from Eastern Europe and the Balkans Film Series presents a film screening of FOUR WINTERS with Q&A by Director Julia Mintz
USA, 2022. 1h 30m. DCP. New Moon Films.
Directed by Julia Mintz

on Tuesday, April 09, 2024, 7:00 p.m.
Auditorium, 53 Wall St. (first floor)
New Haven, CT 06511
Free and open to the public | All films will be shown with English subtitles

Sponsors:
Edward J. and Dorothy Clarke Kempf Memorial Fund; Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies Program; European Studies Council; Whitney Humanities Center; Yale Film Archive; Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures; Film and Media Studies Program; and the Jewish Studies Program.

About the Film Series: In the aftermath of World War II, several European states started reconstructing and reimagining their identities and recent histories by producing a vast number of films that celebrated and commemorated their guerrilla struggles against fascism. These films ranged in scope and ambition from intimate psychological dramas to overblown military spectacles, from elegiac recollections to pure pulp fiction. Similar to Hollywood westerns, partisan films were the defining genre of the socialist film industry for a significant period. Moreover, in the late 60s and early 70s, both genres reinvented themselves and underwent a political revision that ended their respective “classical periods.” Despite being hugely successful in their domestic markets and often cinematically accomplished, many examples of the partisan films never traveled abroad, and most film prints today remain locked up and in dire need of preservation in various national film archives. Aside from a handful of canonical works, the majority of films we will screen have never been shown in the U.S.

Admission: 
Free
Open To: 

A Musical Journey to Cyprus: Traditional Songs of Love, Sorrow, and Hope

Event time: 
Saturday, April 27, 2024 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 101 (Auditorium) See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Throughout history, Cyprus has been variously described as ‘the island of love’, ‘the birthplace of Aphrodite’, ‘the island of saints,’ and ‘the land of lemon and olive trees. In the past half century, Cyprus has also been known as a land of pain and sorrow; an island of division and loss. On this musical journey to Cyprus, Nicoletta Demetriou (voice), Nikitas Tampakis (viola), and Panayotis League (laouto) explore this varied identity, as expressed through the island’s music and song. Join these three accomplished musicians on an imaginary journey to Cyprus, as they sing about the joys and intricacies of love, the pain and sorrow of loss, and the hope for better days to come

With Nicoletta Demetriou (voice), Nikitas Tampakis (viola), and Panayotis League (laouto)

The Activities of the Hellenic Studies Program are generously funded by the Stavros Niarchos Center for Hellenic Studies at Yale University.

Admission: 
Free

Disentangling Disinformation | Selling the Extreme: How Terrorists Use Marketing to Disseminate Their Propaganda

Event time: 
Tuesday, March 26, 2024 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Online See map
Event description: 

Organized by the Program on Peace and Development at Yale University, MADE (Mass Atrocities in the Digital Era), and the Department of Social Justice Education at the University of Toronto

203-432-0061

Disentangling Disinformation | Barbarophilia: Into a Foreign Tongue Our Sorrow and Love Pass

Event time: 
Friday, March 8, 2024 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Online See map
Event description: 

“We have languages coming into our country … they have languages that nobody in this country has ever heard of. It’s a horrible thing.” Donald Trump, February 24, 2024

George Syrimis grew up on the island of Cyprus. After completing his military service, he received a Fulbright Scholarship to study at Cornell University where he completed his B.Sc. in Education in 1990. He subsequently pursued graduate work at Harvard University where he studied Modern Greek, Classical Greek and Modern Spanish literature. His dissertation on the poetics of C.P. Cavafy’s love poems was entitled “”Try to Guard Them, Poet”: Homoeroticism and the Poetics of Opacity in C. P. Cavafy.” In 2001, he joined the newly established Program in Hellenic Studies at Yale University as the language lector and in 2004 was promoted to associate Program Chair of the same program. He has published articles on the oral tradition, Georgios Vizyenos, Cavafy, Mikis Theodorakis, and Nikos Kazantzakis. In addition to his academic work, he has also developed two electronic projects (Lexis and Ikones) for the instructions of Modern Greek. His research interests include music and national identity, religion and literature, cultural studies, reception studies, and gender and sexuality. His current research focuses on the literature on Julian the Apostate from the Enlightenment to the present.

Organized by the Program on Peace and Development at Yale University, MADE (Mass Atrocities in the Digital Era), and the Department of Social Justice Education at the University of Toronto

203-432-0061

Another Conversation with Arman Tatoyan: Updates on the Artsakh Nagorno-Karabakh Conflict

Event time: 
Monday, March 4, 2024 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Arman Tatoyan holds his Master of Laws from University of Pennsylvania Law School; he obtained his LLM and Ph.D. from YSU, Department of Criminal Procedure and Criminalistics. Mr. Tatoyan is the former Human Rights Defender (Ombudsman) of Armenia and an Ad hoc Judge in the European Court of Human Rights. He served as the Deputy Minister of Justice of the Republic of Armenia and also has been the Deputy Representative of the Government of Armenia before the European Court of Human Rights. Mr. Tatoyan is also a permanent international advisor in the Council of Europe. He has been the advisor to the President of the Constitutional Court of Republic of Armenia and has been involved in different working groups for drafting laws and strategies for Armenia. He lectures in YSU and AUA, as well as in the Academy of Justice of Armenia.

Admission: 
Free

203-432-0061

Tuning to the Seasons: Feast Songs of Cyprus- Vasiliki Hadjiadamou and Ensemble

Event time: 
Saturday, March 2, 2024 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 101 (Auditorium) See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Mention of Greek religious music more often than not conjures up liturgical music–singing to be precise, chanting, monophonic or in unison, neumes, modes, an archaic idiom and, its raison d’être, the Word of God. Parallel to liturgical music but independent from it, flourished for centuries an equally rich and long tradition of popular religious songs. Their composition, transmission, orchestration, musical and poetics meters, linguistic idiom as well as the lyrics themselves, are consonant with the Cypriot oral tradition of music and singing. Performed almost exclusively to mark seasonally occurring rituals or rites of passage, they provide the soundtrack of saint’s feasts, wedding, funerals, harvests, and the major religious feasts of Easter, Christmas, New Year/Saint Vassilis, Epiphany, and the Advent of Lent. We are happy to bring to our audience a repertoire of feast songs from Cyprus that are rarely performed outside their ritual context or for the general public.

The Activities of the Hellenic Studies Program are generously funded by the Stavros Niarchos Center for Hellenic Studies at Yale University.

Admission: 
Free

Gender in the Courtroom: Overlooked Factors in Decision-Making and Their Impact on Rights Adjudication | Juliana Cesario Alvim Gomes

Event time: 
Tuesday, March 26, 2024 - 11:45am to 1:30pm
Location: 
Rosenkranz Hall RKZ, 202 See map
115 Prospect Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

The European Studies Council and the Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies at Yale present a talk by Dr. Juliana Cesario Alvim Gomes (Central European University; Austria / Federal University of Minas Gerais; Brazil) on “Gender in the Courtroom: Overlooked Factors in Decision-Making and Their Impact on Rights Adjudication.”

Lunch at 11:45am ET, talk at 12:00pm ET
Part of the European & Russian Studies Community Lunch Seminar Series
Co-Sponsored by the Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies

Juliana Cesario Alvim Gomes is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Legal Studies at Central European University (CEU) in Austria. Her main fields of research are human rights and constitutional law, on topics such as gender and sexuality, social mobilization and courts, equality and difference, and strategic litigation for human rights.

Before joining CEU, she was an assistant professor at Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), where she also coordinated the Human Rights Clinic.

She is the co-chair of the Brazilian Chapter of the International Society of Public Law (ICON-s) and co-hosts a weekly podcast on the Brazilian Supreme Court and Constitution.

For the last decade, Juliana has litigated for human rights before Brazilian and international courts. Since 2018, she is a legal consultant for the Center for Reproductive Rights on issues such as abortion and maternal health in Brazil.

Admission: 
Free
In Person and on Zoom
Open To: 

Decolonizing Eastern Europe: A Baltic Perspective on a Global Debate | Linda Kaljundi

Event time: 
Tuesday, March 5, 2024 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 202 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

The Baltic Studies Program is pleased to welcome Prof. Linda Kaljundi (Estonian Academy of Arts, Professor of Cultural History / Fulbright Scholar at MIT Program in STS) to give a talk on “Decolonizing Eastern Europe: A Baltic Perspective on a Global Debate.”

Debates about the decolonization of Eastern Europe have been present in the region for much of the post-socialist period. Russia’s full-scale war in Ukraine has finally brought the issue to the attention of the global academic community, a development that has been accompanied by a growing interest among Western scholars in the histories and archives of the borderlands of the former Russian Empire and the USSR.

Not least because of this tense and tragic (though also eye-opening) context, the question of how to decolonize Eastern Europe seems as complex as ever, both on a conceptual and a very practical level. In my presentation, I argue that this new wave of decolonization should go hand in hand with a new wave of writing Russian colonial history from the perspective of the borderlands. Emphasizing the need to challenge the ideas of Russia as a second-hand empire, I also emphasize the challenge of not forgetting the complexity of colonial entanglements in the borderlands.

Drawing primarily from my curatorial research in the transdisciplinary exhibition projects Art and Science (2022) and The Conqueror’s Eye (2019), I examine critical object and collection histories as a way of working through colonial history and colonial amnesia in the Baltics.

Linda Kaljundi is a historian and curator, Professor of Cultural history at Estonian Academy of Arts and Senior Research Fellow in environmental history at Tallinn University. She holds a PhD from the University of Helsinki. Kaljundi has published on Baltic and Nordic premodern and modern history and historiography, collective memory and nation building, as well as the entangled histories of environment, colonialism and science. She has also co-curated a number of interdisciplinary exhibitions, including History in Images – Image in History (2018), The Conqueror’s Eye (2019), Art or Science (2022), and Art in the Age of the Anthropocene (2023), all at Kumu Art Museum, Tallinn. She has co-edited a number of article collections and exhibition catalogues, as well as published a monograph on visual culture as a medium of cultural memory (History in Images – Image in History: National and Transnational Past in Estonian Art, with Tiina-Mall Kreem, 2018).

Admission: 
Free
In Person and on Zoom
Open To: 

Latvia's Jewish Cultures before the Catastrophe | Iveta Leitane

Event time: 
Thursday, March 28, 2024 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

The Yale Baltic Studies Program presents a talk on ‘ “Latvia’s Jewish Cultures before the Catastrophe” featuring Baltic Studies Juris Padegs Associate Research Scholar, Dr. Iveta Leitane.

Between two world wars, the Republic of Latvia, could be considered a center of intense cultural semiosis. The cultural life of Latvian Jews at the beginning of the 20th century until the Holocaust was vibrant, diverse and enriched by international contacts. Latvian Jewish literature was published in Yiddish, Hebrew, Russian, Latvian and German, and included rabbinic and philosophical works. Visual arts and scholarship across disciplines of the humanities flourished in conditions of close relationship with the Jewish cultural life in Lithuania, Russia, Belarus, and Poland, revealing various levels of ‘own’ and ‘foreign’ elements and presenting a semiosis brimming with tension. Jewish cultures in Latvia assimilated critical and post-critical impulses from their own and surrounding culture and scholarship to varying degrees, thereby actively interpreting it and creating competing cultural models. A case study into this corner of European Jewish culture before the Catastrophe explores Jewish “cultural alliances” in Latvia: leftist ideas with various justifications, different branches of Zionism and territorialism, and clashing ideas about Judaism and Yidishkeyt.

Iveta Leitane had been Research Associate at the Department of Humanities, University of Latvia, in Riga, where she as a part of a research team just completed an intricate project on Gastropoetics in the Yiddish literature in Latvia. Previously Dr. Leitane taught in the capacity of Associate Professor at the Department of Theology, University of Latvia. Iveta Leitane is permanently affiliated with the Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Latvia. In the intervening years she had been a Visiting Fellow and Research Associate at the Universities of Tubingen, Cologne, Bonn, Leipzig, Marburg, Princeton, Paris (GHI, EPHE) and Ružomberok. Iveta Leitane completed her Ph.D. at the University of Tubingen, Germany. Her dissertation examined the role different components of religion(s) played in the construction of national identity in the 19th and 20th centuries in Latvia. Dr. Leitane’s work focuses on Marburg Neo-Kantianism and the Jewish thought and culture in Baltics and Circumbaltics. She has published widely in the field of Judaic Studies, Religious Studies, Philosophy of Religion and Comparative Literature. She also has a long-standing interest in intellectual resistance movements in East and West. At Yale Dr. Leitane will complete her study, titled Latvia at the Crossroads of European Jewish Cultures: Mimesis, Difference, and Rapprochement.

Lunch will be provided.

Admission: 
Free
In Person and on Zoom. Register below.
Open To: 

Alfred Dreyfus: The Man at the Center of the Affair

Event time: 
Monday, February 26, 2024 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Online See map
Speaker/Performer: 
Maurice Samuels and Alice Kaplan
Event description: 

Please join us for a conversation to celebrate the publication of Maurice Samuels’s new book, Alfred Dreyfus: The Man at the Center of the Affair

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

Open To: 
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