General Public

The Impact of Social, Economic and Political Inequalities on Health in Russia and CIS Countries

Event time: 
Wednesday, January 26, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
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Speaker/Performer: 
Dr.Yuri Frantsuz, Fulbright Visiting Scholar, University of New Mexico
Event description: 

The REEES Program of the MacMillan Center, Yale University, presents Dr. Yuri Frantsuz, a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at the University of New Mexico and a Research Fellow at the Institute of Sociology of the Russian Academy of Science, on “The Impact of Social, Economic and Political Inequalities on Health in Russia and CIS Countries”
Register to attend on zoom: https://bit.ly/REEES-YFrantsuz
Problem of social, economic, and political inequalities’ impact on health differentials is the one that is becoming more current worldwide. One can mention increase of inequality between major tiers of the countries or increasing social and economic inequality in US and Western Europe these days, to name but a few. Many experts predict the increase of social and economic inequality in the world, in opposite to what the proponents of globalization have predicted earlier. One of the most impressive examples of the listed types of inequalities have recently emerged in Russia and other former republics, then comprising the USSR and currently the CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States) countries.

Last two and a half decades were characterized with significant increase of an overall economic and social inequality in Russia and many of the CIS countries. This phenomenon was the result of the transition from the planned, or the so-called administrative-command economy to the specific types of market economy. It took place at all CIS countries during the last two and a half decades, though at a different pace and with a great variety of the market economy kinds across these countries.
Major theories of social and economic inequality’s impact on major determinants of health operate at three levels: micro-personal, mesa-community and macro-societal (Rowington, 2011; Whitehead et. al. 2016; Leigh, A., Ch. Jenks, T. Sneeding. 2009). At all levels the degree of control over people’s lives and destiny, a feature of a socioeconomic status (SES), is considered the major factor in affecting health determinants. The macro-level is especially applicable to societies undergoing rapid and radical transition like the former republics of the USSR, currently CIS countries. Indeed, not only social structure but the very cultural attitudes towards different strata, polarization of society and the very ability to control of one’s life and destiny has undergone radical and dramatic change. I attempt to define the impacts of social, economic, and political inequalities on various health differentials, taking into account not only objectively existing inequalities, but also their subjective perceptions, determined by the culture of a given country and region.
Bio: Dr. Yuri Frantsuz is a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at the University of New Mexico and a Research Fellow at the Institute of Sociology of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He is also an invited Lecturer at the Smolny College of Liberal Arts and Science of the St. Petersburg State University. He is a “kandidat nauk” in Economics of Population and Demography, and also received his PhD in Sociology from the University of Minnesota. His areas of research interest include population theories and policies, social and political demography, sociology of health, and social inequality and health.
Dr. Yuri Frantsuz carries several honor awards for teaching and mentorship of students at the universities of Russia and US, and he is a recipient of several prestigious research grants in the US and Europe.

Admission: 
Free
Open To: 

Art, Education, and Protest in Hungary: The Radical Vision of FreeSZFE

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Event time: 
Thursday, January 27, 2022 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
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Event description: 

Zoom webinar registration: https://bit.ly/34gVoQO
In an unprecedented move during the summer of 2020, students and faculty of the University of Theatre and Film of Budapest stood up against the nationalist-populist government’s measure to take full control of the country’s most prestigious art school. First, the institution’s full leadership resigned, and then, in a spectacular protest event, students occupied the iconic downtown building of the university. In the following months, a newly formed self-governing student body organized the most powerful and creative protest movement to this day against Viktor Orbán’s autocratic regime. Meanwhile, the resigned faculty laid the foundations of a new independent organization, the FreeSzFE Society, which has evolved into a vibrant artistic community. Today it offers year-long courses and workshops, produces films and performances, and grants their students diplomas through a network of European universities—all with the support of a wide audience of art-lovers and fans committed to democracy and the autonomy of higher education.
Panelists:
Ildikó Enyedi, Film Director and University Professor (SzFE Society)
László Upor, Dramaturg, Translator, and University Professor (SzFE Society)
Aujeszky Nóra Ilona, Legal Officer, HCLU, former SzFE Student (Television Production)
Moderator:
Anikó Szűcs, Lecturer, Yale University
Sponsored by Beinecke Library, the Postwar Culture Working Group, and the Whitney Humanities Center. For more information about the ART & PROTEST SERIES or to join the mailing list, write to kevin.repp@yale.edu.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
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These are Still Situationist Times with Jacqueline de Jong

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Event time: 
Thursday, December 16, 2021 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
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Event description: 

Zoom webinar registration: https://bit.ly/3xH1YLh
JACQUELINE DE JONG has been a strong and fiercely independent voice of resistance since the fiery debut of her Situationist Times in 1962. Joining us from her home in Amsterdam, Jacqueline will talk about the tense dynamics of art and protest in the 1960s, from the disputes with Debord that shaped first issue of The Situationist Times to her defiant posters for the Atelier Populaire during the Parisian uprisings of May 1968. From there she will turn to her latest work, including the long-delayed seventh number of the Situationist Times and her latest paintings, inspired by the immigration crisis in Europe, currently on display in the solo exhibition Border-Line at Ortuzar Projects in New York. We hope you will join us for this rare opportunity to reflect on the changing role of art in cultures of protest across two distinct historical eras.
Sponsored by Beinecke Library, the Postwar Culture Working Group, and the Whitney Humanities Center. For more information about the ART & PROTEST SERIES or to join the mailing list, write to kevin.repp@yale.edu.

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European & Russian Studies M.A. of Yale University Info Session

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Event time: 
Thursday, December 2, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:15pm
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Event description: 

Join the European Studies Council of the MacMillan Center at Yale for an information session on the application process and opportunities within the European & Russian Studies M.A. program.
Register for the session: https://bit.ly/3HGeL58

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35 Years of Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: The Legacy of Guillermo O’Donnell and Philippe Schmitter

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Event time: 
Wednesday, December 8, 2021 - 12:00pm to 2:00pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Discussants:
1.Prof. Philippe Schmitter: Emeritus Professor of Political Science (EUI), Co-Author of the Book
2.Prof. Gabriela Ippolito-O’Donnell: Professor of Political Science (UNSAM)
3.Prof. Milan Svolik: Professor of Political Science (Yale University)
Moderator:
Martin Mejia: Visiting Doctoral Fellow CLAIS (Yale University/Tulane University)

Admission: 
Free
Zoom Webinar, register in advance

"Clepsydra and Other Poems" Book Discussion with Translator Adam Mahler

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Event time: 
Friday, December 10, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
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Event description: 

Join the Council on Latin American & Iberian Studies and the Yale Translation Initiative to welcome alumnus Adam Mahler back to Yale for a discussion related to a forthcoming book - a new translation of the 1920 book of poems by Portuguese symbolist poet, Camilo Pessanha, who resided in Macau for the last part of his life (1894-1926). The session will feature a reading of a selection of the original poems in Portuguese with Adam’s new translations. Yale Professor David Jackson wrote the introduction for the book, “Camilo Pessanha in Macau (1894-1926): Symbolism, Orientalism, Exile, Modernity in Clepsydra,” and will provide welcome remarks.
Peter Cole, Horace W. Goldsmith Senior Lecturer in Judaic Studies and Senior Lecturer in Comparative Literature at Yale, will moderate the event.

Admission: 
Free
Via Zoom, register in advance

Conference on Reckoning with Empire: The Right to Self-Determination in Historical View

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Event time: 
Friday, November 12, 2021 - 7:45am to Saturday, November 13, 2021 - 2:30pm
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Event description: 

On November 12-13, Yale will host an international conference on decolonization. The conference celebrates a historic occasion—the 60 th anniversary of UN Resolution 1514, “Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples.” Not only was Resolution 1514 a key moment in terms of codifying the international right to self-determination. It also marked a turning point in the history of anticolonialism. While gathering for the conference, titled “Reckoning with Empire: The Right to Self-Determination in Historical View,” more than thirty international scholars will investigate the afterlives, precedents, and consequences of Resolution 1514.
Conference organizers, Professor Samuel Moyn, Henry R. Luce Professor of Jurisprudence at Yale Law School and Professor of History at Yale University, and Charlotte Kiechel, PhD candidate in History at Yale, noted how contemporary audiences, as well as historians, have yet to fully engage with the significance of Resolution 1514’s passage. “Resolution 1514 was a pivotal moment in the long struggle against empire, and it electrified the world, with many unsuspected consequences. Indeed, even today, its legacy is not exhausted,” Professor Moyn reflected.
Register to attend: https://resolution1514.yale.edu/conference-registration
For the Full program & schedule: https://resolution1514.yale.edu/program
On Friday, Nov 11th, at 10:30 AM, the keynote address will be delivered by Professor Adom Getachew. A political theorist, the Neubauer Family Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago, and a Yale alumnus, Professor Getachew works on the history of political thought, theories of race and empire, and postcolonial political theory. She is the author of Worldmaking after Empire: The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination from Princeton University Press (2019) and co-editor, with Jennifer Pitts, of the forthcoming W.E.B. Du Bois’s International Writings. The keynote address is titled “Africa for Africans: The History of Self-Determination before Decolonization.”
Generously sponsored by the European Studies Council at the MacMillan Center, and the Edward J. and Dorothy Clarke Kempf Memorial Fund

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
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Between Turkish Nationalism and Greek Irredentism: The Greek Orthodox Community of Istanbul (ca. 1908-1923)

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Event time: 
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Dimitris Kamouzis
Event description: 

Dimitris Kamouzis is a Researcher at the Centre for Asia Minor Studies (Athens, Greece). He received his PhD in History at the Department of Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies, King’s College London. He has written several articles on the Greek Orthodox populations of the Ottoman Empire/Turkey and is co-editor of the collective volume State – Nationalisms in the Ottoman Empire, Greece and Turkey: Orthodox and Muslims, 1830-1945 (Oxon: SOAS/ Routledge Studies on the Middle East, 2013). His research interests include Non-Muslim Minorities in the Ottoman Empire/Turkey, Greek-Turkish Relations, History of the Greek Diaspora, Oral History, Refugee Studies, and the History of Humanitarianism.
Sponsored by the Hellenic Studies Program at Yale University. The activities of the Hellenic Studies Program are generously funded by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Center for Hellenic Studies at Yale University.

203-432-0061

Event is Postponed: Rethinking Antisemitism for the 21st Century

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Event time: 
Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 8:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Maurice Samuels, Director of the Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism
Event description: 

A Conversation with Professor Maurice Samuels

Admission: 
Free
To request the link please email: lynn.jackson-quinn@yale.edu

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PRFDHR Seminar: Understanding the Causal Impact of Climate on Human Conflict, Professor Marshall Burke

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Event time: 
Tuesday, October 26, 2021 - 2:30pm to 3:45pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Marshall Burke, Stanford University - Department of Earth System Science and Center on Food Security and the Environment
Event description: 

Scholars, writers, and policymakers from Shakespeare to Obama have noted linkages between the physical environment and human behavior toward one another. Professor Burke synthesizes a growing cottage industry of research that seeks to quantitatively measure how changes in climate can affect various types of human conflict. He re-analyzes dozens of individual studies using a common empirical framework and uses Bayesian techniques to study whether – and why – effect sizes differ across settings. Professor Burke finds robust linkages between increasing temperature and multiple types of human violence, including individual level violence (e.g. homicide), organized group violence (e.g. civil war), and self-harm. He then draws implications for a world that continues to warm.
Marshall Burke is associate professor in the Department of Earth System Science and center fellow at the Center on Food Security and the Environment at Stanford University, and research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research focuses on social and economic impacts of environmental change, and on measuring and understanding economic livelihoods across the developing world. His work regularly appears in both economics and scientific journals, including recent publications in Nature, Science, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and The Lancet. He holds a PhD in agricultural and resource economics from UC Berkeley, and a BA in international relations from Stanford. He is also co-founder of AtlasAI, a start-up using satellites and machine learning to measure livelihoods.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
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