Staff

Captivity and Creativity in 20th Century Polish Literature: Józef Czapski and His Poets- A Discussion and Reading

Event time: 
Thursday, April 18, 2024 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Humanities Quadrangle HQ, 136 See map
320 York Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Join Eric Karpeles and Alissa Valles for a discussion of the Polish painter and writer Józef Czapski: his life, his work, and the remarkable range of poets he inspired. Karpeles and Valles are the translators of the NYRB Classics titles Lost Time: Lectures on Proust in a Soviet Prison Camp and Memories of Starobielsk: Essays Between Art and History, respectively, both of which collect Czapski’s critical writing, authored either about or during his internment in a Soviet Prison Camp between 1939 and 1941.

Eric Karpeles is a painter, writer, and translator. His comprehensive guide, Paintings in Proust, considers the intersection of literary and visual aesthetics in the work of the great French novelist. He has written about the paintings of the poet Elizabeth Bishop and about the end of life as seen through the works of Emily Dickinson, Gustav Mahler, and Mark Rothko. He is also the author of Almost Nothing: The 20th-Century Art and Life of Józef Czapski from New York Review Books.

Alissa Valles is a poet, translator and scholar of Polish and Russian literature who has worked for the BBC Russian Service, Institute of War Documentation in Amsterdam and Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw, and teaches at Boston University and Mt Tamalpais College. Most recently she published the poetry collections Anastylosis (with A. Ayerbe and C. Leproust, Whitechapel Art Gallery), Hospitium and a selection of Zuzanna Ginczanka’s poetry, Firebird (NYRB). Forthcoming in 2024 are Oho by Miron Białoszewski (with C. Cavanagh, NYRB) and a Selected Poems of Zbigniew Herbert (with J.M. Coetzee, Penguin Modern Classics). She has been the recipient of awards for poetry and translation from the Poetry Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Modern Language Association.

Sponsors:
Yale Translation Initiative (MacMillan)
Whitney Humanities Center
European Studies Council (MacMillan)
Russian, East European, & Eurasian Studies (MacMillan)
The Department of Slavic Languages and Literature

Admission: 
Free

REEESNe's Roma Studies Student Working Group

Event time: 
Thursday, April 4, 2024 - 10:00am to 11:00am
Location: 
Sterling Memorial Library SML, Lecture Hall See map
120 High Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

REEESNe’s Roma Studies Student Working Group will be holding a symposium at Yale University (Sterling Memorial Library Lecture Hall). The Working Group consists of doctoral and undergraduate students, as well as recent graduates, from institutions such as Brandeis University, Bucknell University, Central Connecticut State University, Duke University, and Southern Connecticut State University, and all are welcome (no registration necessary) to this FREE event, which will feature their scholarship and other work on Romani topics. The daylong symposium will conclude with a keynote panel, in which they have invited Wiesenthal Center and Fortunoff Archive Postdoctoral Fellow Maria Bogdan, as well as Professor Ian McMillen, to speak. We do not foresee this being a hybrid event at this time. The full program will follow shortly.

Admission: 
Free

203-432-0061

The Paradox of Trust in a "Low" Trust Society: Insights from the Case of Greece- Effrosyni Charitopoulou

Event time: 
Monday, April 1, 2024 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Low levels of social trust are widely seen as an impediment to economic development and social cohesion. Trust is measured mainly via surveys: metrics are used extensively in cross-national studies and percolate back to inform societal debates. However, the way in which trust is empirically approached is subject to two problems: measurement bias and the relation between attitudes and behavior. We address both problems focusing on Greece, currently ranked as one of Europe’s least trusting societies. We do so by using four methods: survey questionnaires, ethnography, trust games, and a field experimental exercise. Our combined findings strongly suggest both measurement bias and a discrepancy between attitudes and behavior. We explain this discrepancy and explore the drivers of trusting behavior. Our findings carry important implications about how we measure, study, and theorize interpersonal trust as well as the practice of assigning a unique trust score to entire societies.

Effrosyni Charitopoulou is a political sociologist. She investigates the dynamics of intergroup relations, focusing in particular on local and refugee interactions. She focuses on modern Greece, using both contemporary and historical case studies, but also on other European countries. Her ongoing book project, Encounters on the Migrant Trail, investigates the ways in which host communities in Greece interacted with asylum seekers in the context of the Syrian refugee crisis. She is also working on projects relating to the legacies of refugee integration as well as state exclusion policies on identity, trust, and social cohesion. She holds a DPhil in Sociology from Nuffield College at Oxford. Her doctoral studies were funded by Nuffield College, the A. S. Onassis Foundation, and the A. G. Leventis Foundation. She is currently a Hannah Seeger Davis Postdoctoral Fellow at Princeton.

Admission: 
Free

A Musical Journey to Cyprus: Traditional Songs of Love, Sorrow, and Hope

Event time: 
Saturday, April 27, 2024 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 101 (Auditorium) See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Throughout history, Cyprus has been variously described as ‘the island of love’, ‘the birthplace of Aphrodite’, ‘the island of saints,’ and ‘the land of lemon and olive trees. In the past half century, Cyprus has also been known as a land of pain and sorrow; an island of division and loss. On this musical journey to Cyprus, Nicoletta Demetriou (voice), Nikitas Tampakis (viola), and Panayotis League (laouto) explore this varied identity, as expressed through the island’s music and song. Join these three accomplished musicians on an imaginary journey to Cyprus, as they sing about the joys and intricacies of love, the pain and sorrow of loss, and the hope for better days to come

With Nicoletta Demetriou (voice), Nikitas Tampakis (viola), and Panayotis League (laouto)

The Activities of the Hellenic Studies Program are generously funded by the Stavros Niarchos Center for Hellenic Studies at Yale University.

Admission: 
Free

Screening: "My Big Fat Greek Wedding"

Event time: 
Sunday, March 31, 2024 - 3:00pm to 4:45pm
Location: 
Humanities Quadrangle HQ, L01 See map
320 York Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Toula Portokalos is 30, Greek American, and works in her family’s restaurant, Dancing Zorba’s, in Chicago. All her father Gus wants is for her to get married to a nice Greek boy. But Toula is looking for more in life. Her mother convinces Gus to let her take some computer classes at college (making him think it’s his idea). With those classes under her belt, she then takes over her aunt’s travel agency (again making her father think it’s his idea). She meets Ian Miller, a high school English teacher, WASP, and dreamboat she had made a fool of herself over at the restaurant; they date secretly for a while before her family finds out. Her father is livid over her dating a non-Greek. He has to learn to accept Ian; Ian has to learn to accept Toula’s huge family, and Toula has to learn to accept herself

Admission: 
Free

Disentangling Disinformation | Selling the Extreme: How Terrorists Use Marketing to Disseminate Their Propaganda

Event time: 
Tuesday, March 26, 2024 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Online See map
Event description: 

Dr. Anna Kruglova is Lecturer of Terrorism Studies at the School of Arts and Media at the University of Salford and an Associate Fellow at the International Centre for Counter-Terrorism. Anna has a PhD in International studies from Queen’s University Belfast. She also holds an MA in International Conflict Studies from King’s College London and MSc in Security Studies from UCL.

Her research interests are focusing on terrorist propaganda, and she is particularly interested in exploring the role of Internet, media, and social media in the recruitment process and radicalisation. Currently, Anna’s interests also expanded to the far right (especially in Russia and post-Soviet space) and the role of disinformation and misinformation in international relations.

Organized by the Program on Peace and Development at Yale University, MADE (Mass Atrocities in the Digital Era), and the Department of Social Justice Education at the University of Toronto

203-432-0061

Disentangling Disinformation | Barbarophilia: Into a Foreign Tongue Our Sorrow and Love Pass

Event time: 
Friday, March 8, 2024 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Online See map
Event description: 

George Syrimis grew up on the island of Cyprus. After completing his military service, he received a Fulbright Scholarship to study at Cornell University where he completed his B.Sc. in Education in 1990. He subsequently pursued graduate work at Harvard University where he studied Modern Greek, Classical Greek and Modern Spanish literature. His dissertation on the poetics of C.P. Cavafy’s love poems was entitled “”Try to Guard Them, Poet”: Homoeroticism and the Poetics of Opacity in C. P. Cavafy.” In 2001, he joined the newly established Program in Hellenic Studies at Yale University as the language lector and in 2004 was promoted to associate Program Chair of the same program. He has published articles on the oral tradition, Georgios Vizyenos, Cavafy, Mikis Theodorakis, and Nikos Kazantzakis. In addition to his academic work, he has also developed two electronic projects (Lexis and Ikones) for the instructions of Modern Greek. His research interests include music and national identity, religion and literature, cultural studies, reception studies, and gender and sexuality. His current research focuses on the literature on Julian the Apostate from the Enlightenment to the present.

Organized by the Program on Peace and Development at Yale University, MADE (Mass Atrocities in the Digital Era), and the Department of Social Justice Education at the University of Toronto

203-432-0061

International Law and Human Rights in Nagorno-Karabakh

Event time: 
Monday, March 4, 2024 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 101 (Auditorium) See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

with panelists
Arman Tatoyan, Ph.D. (Law), Professor, Chair of the Master of Arts in Human Rights and Social Justice (HRSJ) Program, American University of Armenia
Armen Marsoobian, Ph.D., Professor and Chair, Department of Philosophy, Southern Connecticut State University
Karnig Kerkonian, J.D., founding partner, Kerkonian Dajani LLP; Armenian delegation to the ICJ
Tamar Hayrikyan, J.D., Clinical Supervisor, University Network for Human Rights

Admission: 
Free

203-432-0061

Tuning to the Seasons: Feast Songs of Cyprus- Vasiliki Hadjiadamou and Ensemble

Event time: 
Saturday, March 2, 2024 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 101 (Auditorium) See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Mention of Greek religious music more often than not conjures up liturgical music–singing to be precise, chanting, monophonic or in unison, neumes, modes, an archaic idiom and, its raison d’être, the Word of God. Parallel to liturgical music but independent from it, flourished for centuries an equally rich and long tradition of popular religious songs. Their composition, transmission, orchestration, musical and poetics meters, linguistic idiom as well as the lyrics themselves, are consonant with the Cypriot oral tradition of music and singing. Performed almost exclusively to mark seasonally occurring rituals or rites of passage, they provide the soundtrack of saint’s feasts, wedding, funerals, harvests, and the major religious feasts of Easter, Christmas, New Year/Saint Vassilis, Epiphany, and the Advent of Lent. We are happy to bring to our audience a repertoire of feast songs from Cyprus that are rarely performed outside their ritual context or for the general public.

The Activities of the Hellenic Studies Program are generously funded by the Stavros Niarchos Center for Hellenic Studies at Yale University.

Admission: 
Free

Pursuing Justice and Accountability in Ukraine, Two Years on from Russia's 2022 Invasion

Event time: 
Monday, February 12, 2024 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Watson Center WTS, A51 See map
60 Sachem Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Janine di Giovanni is a multi-award winning journalist and author, and CEO/Executive Director of The Reckoning Project. Janine was a war reporter for nearly three decades, from the first Palestinian intifada in the early 1990s to the siege of Sarajevo; the Rwandan genocide; the brutal wars in Sierra Leone, Somalia, Ivory Coast and Liberia to Chechnya, Afghanistan, Pakistan. She reported extensively in Iraq pre and post invasion, the Arab Spring, and finally Syria. Her field work for her most recent book took her to Gaza, Iraq, Egypt and Syria. In 2020, the American Academy of Arts and Letters awarded her their highest non fiction prize, the Blake Dodd. Janine served as a Senior Fellow and Professor at Yale University’s Jackson Institute for Global Affairs from 2018-2022 where she taught two human rights courses which looked at eight different conflicts in depth: Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, Sierra Leone, Yemen, Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan. She also taught a course at Yale in Reporting War for Humanitarians. In 2016, CNN made a short video about her life and work when the International Women’s’ Media Foundation gave her their prestigious Courage in Journalism Prize.

For her most recent project, Janine founded and directs The Reckoning Project, a transitional justice organization that trains researchers in Ukraine to collect testimonies that can be used in court. Through her work as a conflict journalist, Janine has experienced firsthand the frustration when testimonies collected directly from victims are inadmissible in courts. So, in partnership with Peter Pomerantsev, she’s created a team of legal experts and journalists to bridge the gap between journalism and justice.

With the second anniversary of Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine, it is worth taking stock of the status of various efforts to pursue justice for international crimes. Di Giovanni, whose organization The Reckoning Project supports testimony collection and preservation, will address the success, challenges, and opportunities in this realm

With support of the Program on Peace and Development, the Genocide Studies Program and the Schell Center for International Human Rights

Admission: 
Free

203-432-0061
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