General Public

VIRTUAL: 2034: A Novel of the Next World War

Event time: 
Wednesday, March 10, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

The Jackson Institute for Global Affairs will host a virtual discussion with Visiting Fellow Adm. Jim Stavridis regarding his new book—his tenth, but his first work of fiction.
Stavridis is the former Supreme Allied Commander of NATO and Dean of The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He is currently an Operating Executive at The Carlyle Group.
2034: A Novel of the Next World War, is a geopolitical thriller that imagines a naval clash between the United States and China in the South China Sea, and the path from there to a global confrontation. Featured as a six-part series in Wired Magazine, 2034 is written as a disturbingly plausible work of speculative fiction. The novel takes us inside the minds of American, Chinese, Iranian, Russian, and Indian officials, as a series of miscalculations on all sides leads the world into an intensifying international storm.
How can the United States and China prevent strategic competition from spiraling into conflict? How can works of fiction inspire creative, innovative approaches to Sino-American relations?
The conversation will be moderated by Paul Kennedy, J. Richardson Dilworth Professor of History and Global Affairs.
Jackson Visiting Fellows are distinguished practitioners invited to participate in an immersive multi-day program on the Yale campus, highlighting their extraordinary contributions to global affairs. They enrich the Jackson and broader university community through attending classes, giving public talks, and interacting with students and faculty through a variety of engaging events.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

Greece Too: Persephone’s Rape and Sexual Violence in 21st Century Greece.

Event time: 
Monday, March 15, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Sissy Vovou
Event description: 

A discussion with Sissy Vovou, Activist, Feminist Movement Το Μωβ and Maria Pentrarki, Queen’s University Belfast.

203-432-0061

The 1825 Decembrist Revolt in Russia and the Greek Revolution

Event time: 
Monday, March 1, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
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Speaker/Performer: 
Paul Bushkovitch
Event description: 

Paul Bushkovitch is Reuben Post Halleck Prof of History at Yale University.
Paul Bushkovitch received his Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1975. He specializes in Russia before the eighteenth century. He is the author of The Merchants of Moscow 1580-1650 (1980), Religion and Society in Russia, the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (1992), (with Maija Jansson and Nikolai Rogozhin) “England and the North: the Russian Embassy of 1613-1614,” Memoirs of the American Philosophical Society 210 (1994), Peter the Great (2001), Peter the Great: The Struggle for Power, 1671-1725 (2001), and A Concise History of Russia, Cambridge, 2012.
Co-Sponsored by the Hellenic Studies Program, European Studies Council, and Program on Russian, Eurasian, and East European Studies.
Part of The Greek Revolution Across the Globe, Lecture Series.

203-432-0061

The Heart of Fiction

Event time: 
Tuesday, March 16, 2021 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
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Pulitzer Prize finalist Hernan Diaz to deliver spring 2021 Finzi-Contini Lecture
Why dwell on made-up stories? Why make them up in the first place? Can fiction, that pack of lies, aspire to some form of truth? Award-winning novelist Hernan Diaz will present a Finzi-Contini lecture titled “The Heart of Fiction” on Tuesday, March 16, at 4:30 pm EST via Zoom.
Hernan Diaz is the author of the novel In the Distance (2017), a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award, a Publisher’s Weekly Top Ten Book of the Year, and winner of the Saroyan International Prize, the Cabell Award, the Prix Page America, and the New American Voices Award. Diaz has received a Whiting Award and fellowships from Bread Loaf and the MacDowell Colony. He has also written a study of Borges’s influence on North American literature, Borges, between History and Eternity (2012), and published work in Cabinet, the New York Times, the Kenyon Review, Playboy, Granta, and the Paris Review. Born in Argentina, Diaz was raised in Sweden and studied in London and in New York, where he now serves as associate director of the Hispanic Institute at Columbia University and editor of the Revista Hispánica Moderna.
The Finzi-Contini Lectureship honors Bianca M. Finzi-Contini Calabresi, a scholar of European literature and a native of Ferrara who left fascist Italy for the United States. The lectureship was founded by her sons, the Honorable Guido Calabresi, Judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, and the late Dr. Paul Calabresi. The distinguished list of past lecturers includes Tzvetan Todorov, Orhan Pamuk, Maxine Hong Kingston, Amitav Ghosh, and Masha Gessen. The lectures are devoted to any aspect of comparative literature and culture.
This event is cosponsored by The Yale Review.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

203-432-0670

Population Movements Under Lockdown: Refugees and Migrants in Greece and Lebanon

Event time: 
Monday, February 22, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Join us as Epaminondas Farmakis, founder of HumanRights360, and Sally Abi Khalil, Country Director of Oxfam in Lebanon, bring us up to date on the refugee and migrant experience during the Covid19 year in Greece and Lebanon. As the political and social landscape of Greece shifted with a new conservative government, the military response to the expulsion of refugees from Turkey in February 2012, the banning of the neo-Nazi and anti-immigrant party Golden Dawn, and the burning of Moria camp on Lesvos, we revisit the ongoing humanitarian crisis now under the worst medical threat of the century. Lebanon’s proximity to Syria, the apocalyptic explosion at Beirut’s harbor, and the exacerbation of chronic political corruption that has brought the country’s economy to the brink of collapse, call for a reappraisal of and refocusing on this historic demographic shift that has been obscured by the pandemic and the concurrent political turmoil in the United States.
• Epaminondas Farmakis, Founder of HumanRights360
• Sally Abi Khalil, Country Director of Oxfam in Lebanon
Moderated by:
• Kaveh Khoshnood, Yale School of Public Health
• George Syrimis, Hellenic Studies Program, Yale University

203-432-0061

Great Power Competition and post-Brexit Britain

Event time: 
Friday, February 12, 2021 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

The European Studies Council will host a panel of experts on “Great Power Competition and post-Brexit Britain”
Featuring the following speakers:
Paul Kennedy, J. Richardson Dilworth Professor of History, Yale University
Shashank Joshi, Defense Editor of The Economist
Suzanne Raine, Lecturer, Cambridge University; formerly of the UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office and Head of the Joint Terrorism Assessment Centre
Hamish Falconer, member of Britain’s diplomatic service, European Studies Council Visiting Fellow (Spring 2021), Yale World Fellow 2020
Please register for the virtual event: http://bit.ly/GreatPower-PostBrexit
Suzanne Raine served in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office from 1995-2019, including postings in Poland, Iraq (2003) and Pakistan (2006-9). She worked primarily on national security issues and specialised in counter-terrorism, holding a number of senior domestic appointments including Head of the Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre from 2015-2017. She was also a senior member of the HMG’s assessment community and is particularly interested in the role of assessment in strategic decision making at a time of crisis.
Suzanne was born in Germany and educated at Peterhouse, Cambridge where she was awarded a double first in history, specialising in German history. She is now an affiliated lecturer at the Forum on Geopolitics, Cambridge University and member of the Board of Trustees of the Imperial War Museum and the Royal United Services Institute.
Shashank Joshi is The Economist‘s defence editor. Prior to joining The Economist in 2018, he served as Senior Research Fellow at the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) and Research Associate at Oxford University’s Changing Character of War Programme. He has published books on Iran’s nuclear programme and India’s armed forces, written for a wide range of newspapers and journals, and appeared regularly on radio and television. He holds degrees from Cambridge and Harvard, where he served as a Kennedy Scholar from Britain to the United States.
Paul M. Kennedy is the J. Richardson Dilworth Professor of History and Distinguished Fellow of the Brady-Johnson Program in Grand Strategy. He served as the director of ISS from 1989 until 2017, and he is now the director of the maritime and naval studies initiative.
A native of northern England, Professor Kennedy obtained his BA at Newcastle University and his D.Phil at the University of Oxford. He is a former Fellow of the Institute for Advanced Studies, Princeton University, and of the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung, Bonn. He holds many honorary degrees, and is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, the American Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was made Commander of the Order of the British Empire (C.B.E.) in 2000 for services to History and elected a Fellow of the British Academy in June 2003. He is the author or editor of nineteen books, including The Rise of the Anglo-German Antagonism, The War Plans of the Great Powers, The Realities Behind Diplomacy, and Preparing for the Twenty-First Century. His best-known work is The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers (Random House), which provoked an intense debate on its publication in 1988 and has been translated into over twenty languages. He is on the editorial board of numerous scholarly journals and writes for The New York Times, The Atlantic, and many foreign-language newspapers and magazines. His monthly column on current global issues is distributed worldwide by the Los Angeles Times Syndicate/Tribune Media Services.
His latest book, Engineers of Victory: The Problem Solvers who Turned the Tide in the Second World War, was published in 2013 by Random House. He is now working on a study of sea power in the same war, and recently completed a new foreword to his classic 1976 book, The Rise and Fall of British Naval Mastery.

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After the Deportation: Memory Battles in Postwar France

Event time: 
Wednesday, March 10, 2021 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Philip G. Nord (Professor of History, Princeton University)
Event description: 

The Benjamin (Yale 1962) and Barbara Zucker Lecture Series
Philip G. Nord will engage in conversation with Carolyn Dean and Maurice Samuels about his new book, After the Deportation: Memory Battles in Postwar France.
An estimated 160,000 people, a mix of résistants and Jews, were deported from France to concentration camps in Central and Eastern Europe during the Second World War. In the decades following the Liberation, the French argued over how to remember the deportees, generating competing narratives about the Deportation experience–Communist, Gaullist, Jewish, and Catholic. This talk will analyze these narratives and how they were given form in literature, art, film, and monuments.

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Scientific Babel and Other Translating Machines

Event time: 
Friday, January 29, 2021 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Michael Gordin, the Rosengarten Professor of Modern and Contemporary History, Princeton University
Event description: 

The Translation Initiative and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies at Yale’s MacMillan Center are pleased to present an upcoming talk by Michael Gordin (History, Princeton University) on
“Scientific Babel and Other Translating Machines”
Michael Gordin is the Rosengarten Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at Princeton University, where he specializes in the history of modern science and Russian, European, and American history. He has co-edited several volumes and is the author of six monographs. Most of his work concentrates on the boundaries between science in the Slavic world and the West, the history of nuclear weapons, and the history of knowledge on the fringes of science. He is the author, most recently, of Einstein in Bohemia (Princeton, 2020), and Scientific Babel: How Science Was Done Before and After Global English (Chicago, 2015).
Professor Gordin will speak about his recent article, “The Forgetting and Rediscovery of Soviet Machine Translation,” Critical Inquiry 46.4 (Summer 2020), available here: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/pdf/10.1086/709226, as well as his 2015 book Scientific Babel: How Science Was Done Before and After Global English (University of Chicago Press) and more recent research—in conversation with Marijeta Bozovic (Slavic Languages and Literatures, Yale).
Register to Attend Virtual Event: http://bit.ly/Translation-SciBabel

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The Greek Fire. American-Ottoman Relations and Democratic Fervor in the Age of Revolutions

Event time: 
Wednesday, March 31, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Dr. Maureen Connors Santelli
Event description: 

Maureen Connors Santelli is an Associate Professor of History at Northern Virginia Community College.
Part of the The Greek Revolution Across the Globe, Lecture Series.

203-432-0061

Antisemitism and Fantasies of National Purity from Mussolini to the Present

Event time: 
Tuesday, February 23, 2021 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Ruth Ben-Ghiat, Professor of History and Italian Studies, New York University
Event description: 

The Benjamin (Yale 1962) and Barbara Zucker Lecture Series
This talk will examine the place of fantasies of national purity in selected authoritarian states from Mussolini to the present, and how racial legislation and propaganda, such as that directed at Jews, factors into this larger context. We will look at the three timeframes and states of mind strongman leaders leverage: utopia, nostalgia, and crisis.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

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