General Public

Identity, Agency, and the Constraints of Political Conditionality

Event time: 
Thursday, December 17, 2020 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Gintare Venzlauskaite, the Joseph P. Kazickas Visiting Fellow, Yale
Event description: 

The European Studies Council and the Baltic Studies Program at Yale present Dr. Gintare Venzlauskaite, the Joseph P. Kazickas Visiting Fellow, Yale, on “Identity, Agency, and the Constraints of Political Conditionality: Understanding Lithuanian Diasporas of Displacement Through Narratives of Return”

In her presentation Dr. Venzlauskaitė will discuss Lithuanian ethno-national domestic and diasporic communities characterized by mid-20th-century displacements and examine experiences, identity and memory through the lens of homecoming. Drawing from qualitative data collected in Lithuania, the Russian Federation, the United States, and Latvia, she highlights understudied aspects and manifestations of return, emphasizing the polyphony of perspectives, as well as the dynamics of forced migrants’ human agency and the structural-political domains that they were subjected to.
Register for Virtual Event: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_x0aJWuvvTAeGviRAM5QP3w
Gintare Venzlauskaite is the Joseph P. Kazickas Visiting Fellow at Yale for the Fall 2020 semester. Gintare Venzlauskaitė is an instructor at the University of Stirling (Scotland, UK), a Research Affiliate at the University of Glasgow, and a Junior Researcher at Kaunas University of Technology (Lithuania). Her research centers on Lithuanian twentieth-century diasporas and the complexities attendant to return and repatriation. She received her Ph.D. degree in Central and East European Studies from the University of Glasgow in 2019. Her doctoral dissertation, “From Post-War West to Post-Soviet East: Manifestations of Displacement, Collective Memory, and Lithuanian Diasporic Experience Revisited,” draws on qualitative data collected in five countries in which live Lithuanians affected by World War II-era migrations westward and Soviet deportations to the east. At Yale she will be working to turn her dissertation into a monograph. The book will discuss displaced persons and the resulting diasporas as both implicated and implicating Lithuanian grand narratives and national identity, while also eliciting the importance of plurality of memory and the multivocality of diasporic experience.

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Weapons of Mass Instruction in Putin's Russia: the Baltics in Educational Policies and Teaching History

Event time: 
Wednesday, December 9, 2020 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Dr. Solvita Denisa-Liepniece, the Juris Padegs Visiting Fellow, Yale
Event description: 

The European Studies Council and the Baltic Studies Program at Yale present Dr. Solvita Denisa-Liepniece, the Juris Padegs Visiting Fellow, on “Weapons of Mass Instruction in Putin’s Russia: the Baltics in Educational Policies and Teaching History.”
Register for Virtual Event: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_y2GdPkadTUCAsga5mtaNpQ
Solvita Denisa-Liepniece is the Juris Padegs Visiting Fellow at Yale for the Fall 2020 semester. Dr. Denisa-Liepniece is the Assistant Professor at Vidzeme University of Applied Sciences in Valmiera, Latvia. Her research interests are strategic political communication, intercultural communication, and information resilience. She completed her Ph.D. at the University of Antwerp in 2013 with a thesis on political communication in post-Soviet Belarus. Dr. Denisa-Liepniece serves as the country expert for several international organizations focused on media literacy and information resilience in the Baltic countries. At Yale she is studying the (re)construction of memory of Latvia and the Baltic states in Russia’s state-sponsored education discourse. She is co-author of several books on communication and media and published in 2019 a fairy tale for children on media literacy (also translated in Russian and Romanian). In addition to academic activities, Dr. Denisa-Liepniece has also had a career as a professional journalist and worked for Public Broadcasting of Latvia in the fields of both television and radio for more than fifteen years.

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European & Russian Studies M.A. Info Session

Event time: 
Tuesday, December 8, 2020 - 9:30am to 10:30am
Location: 
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Event description: 

Join the European Studies Council of the MacMillan Center at Yale for an information session on the application process and opportunities within the European & Russian Studies M.A. program.
Register for the session: https://bit.ly/ERSMAinfosess

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
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Women in White: A Feminist Revolution of a New Kind in Belarus?

Event time: 
Friday, December 4, 2020 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Women have been the center of the protest movement in Belarus against the rule of Alexander Lukashenko, including in the disputed elections of August 9, with the opposition led by Svetlana Tikhanovskaya. Women’s visions and voices for change and revolution in Belarus are the focus of this international panel.
Register for virtual event: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_jKuKbcNeSE-bgmmFJDAuWQ
Panel Participants:
Elena Gapova (Western Michigan University)
Olena Lennon (University of New Haven)
Julia Mickiewicz (Co-founder of the Feminist group within the Coordination Council, Belarus)
Maksimas Milta (European Humanities University)
Marylia Sliaptsova (Barys Zvozskau Belarusian Human Rights House)
Discussant: Aniko Szucs (Yale University)

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Enduring Utopia: Eastern Europe in Video Games

Event time: 
Thursday, December 3, 2020 - 3:30pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Daniil Leiderman, Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University
Event description: 

The first colloquium in the REEES Emerging Voices Virtual Colloquium series featuring Daniil Leiderman, Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University, on “Enduring Utopia: Eastern Europe in Video Games” The colloquium is hosted by Marijeta Bozovic, Assistant Professor of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film and Media Studies; Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies, Yale University
Register for Virtual Event: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_XLhuAUW6RnW1esllzN90ig
BIO:
Daniil M. Leiderman teaches Art History and Games Studies at the Department of Visualization at Texas A&M University. In 2016, Daniil defended a PhD dissertation entitled: Moscow Conceptualism and “Shimmering”: Authority, Anarchism, and Space at the Department of Art & Archaeology in Princeton University. The project investigates the Moscow Conceptualists, a circle of experimental artists and writers that emerged in Moscow’s unofficial artistic scene in the early 1970s in the context of nonconformism, tracing their development of the critical strategy called “shimmering” and its relationship to contemporary Post-Soviet and Post-Crimean artistic resistance. Most recently, Daniil has been working on a book under contract with Amherst College Press, on the representation of utopian and dystopian projects through images of Eastern Europe in contemporary video games.

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A Decade into the European Refugees Crisis: Movie Screening & Talk with Mauro Mondello

Event time: 
Monday, November 16, 2020 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

The European Studies Council, the Program on Refugees, Forced Displacement, and Humanitarian Responses, and Mauro Mondello, World Fellow 2020; Reporter, Freelance Journalist present a screening of documentary shorts and a discussion addressing both the humanitarian crisis started in 2011 and the refugees in Europe during COVID-19.
Please register in advance for the zoom webinar link: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_B06VVaf7SWa56Oc_q0DF9w
Stateless, by Mauro Mondello and Nunzio Gringery - 2011
Lampedusa in Berlin, by Mauro Mondello, cinematography by Paolo Lafratta - 2015
Among many other crises around the world, the European Refugees Crisis, which started in 2011 as a consequence of the Libyan and Syrian wars, is, still today, the most impactful for Europe. Namely, from security to economic or from political to geostrategic, its impacts on Europe are multifaceted. The migration dimension is, however, the most significant one. In addition to its crucial humanitarian extent, it is a source of dissent, contention and competition among the different EU Member States. Discussions around irregular migration have been threatening the solidarity and damaging the reputation of the EU. Together with the rapidly changing regional and global dynamics, the conditions of EU aspiring refugees/migrants has been worsening. Since the beginning of 2020, besides, COVID-19 and connected anti-migration policies of the EU Member States had severe impacts on the conditions of refugees/irregular migrants which are shadowed by the dazzling developments in other fields.
Mauro Mondello is a World Fellow 2020, a freelance reporter, war correspondent, documentary filmmaker and the co-founder of Yanez, an online long-form journalism magazine. Often focusing on human rights and freedoms, his reporting strives to garner dignity and respect for all cultures and religions and to foster an open society that provides shelter for refugees and space for all humanity. He began his journalism career as a staff journalist in Italy and was based in South America between 2008 and 2011. He then moved to Tunis to report on the Arab Spring uprisings in Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt. From 2013 to 2019, he was based in Berlin, Germany. Mauro’s current work reports on a variety of issues, including refugees, migration, human rights, EU foreign policy, civil movements, mafia and Italian criminality, nuclear waste and climate change. His documentaries include “Lampedusa in Berlin,” a report about the eviction of migrants in Berlin, filmed in 2015.

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African American Performance in Post-WWII Soviet/Yugoslav Space and Screens

Event time: 
Wednesday, December 16, 2020 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Ian MacMillen, Lecturer at Yale's Department of Music
Event description: 

The Russian, East European, & Eurasian Studies Program presents Dr. Ian MacMillen, Yale University, to discuss “African American Performance in Post-WWII Soviet/Yugoslav Space and Screens.”
Please register for the zoom webinar link: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_2Il8C3jeTgixb9hDN2GEGg
Throughout the 20th century, and especially after WWII, people of African descent immigrated to the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia from both sub-Saharan Africa and its diasporas in North America. Yet in both federal socialist republics, locals of non-African descent were often less likely to have contact with or reason to think about local Black citizens than they were to encounter elite African American performers, either through their tours or through the mediation and dissemination of their work (in all cases arranged and overseen by high-ranking Communist Party officials and/or the U.S. State Department and Information Agency). This talk examines comparatively the history of postwar African American performance (especially music) in the USSR and Yugoslavia and its effects upon audio-visual culture in both countries and particularly within their films.
Ian MacMillen is a Lecturer at Yale’s Department of Music. His scholarship focuses on such subjects as the use of jazz in Soviet animated film; racialized trauma and the interaction of music and flags in American and post-Yugoslav cultural memory; sonic fascination in Bulgarian music tourism; and the racialization and denial of affect among the former Yugoslavia’s tambura stringband musicians. His book on the latter topic, Playing It Dangerously, was published by Wesleyan University Press in 2019, and he is currently working on a new monograph on the complicity of music and other sound in forgetting 20th-century atrocities in Central and Southeastern Europe.

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Can Britain Have a Grand Strategy after Brexit Panel

Event time: 
Monday, November 9, 2020 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
TBA
Event description: 

The EU Studies Program along with Hamish Falconer, World Fellow 2020, present a panel of experts to discuss “Can Britain Have a Grand Strategy after Brexit” Featuring the following speakers:
Ben Judah is a foreign policy writer based in New York, with his current research focus on the foreign and economic policy of both post-Brexit Britain and a potential future Biden-Harris Administration.
Georgina is a senior researcher at the Institute for Government where she focuses on Global Britain, Franco-British relations and the future of the EU. She is also a Visiting Fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States.
Hamish Falconer is a former member of Britain’s foreign service and a current World Fellow
Moderated by: Professor David Cameron, Professor of Political Science
Please register in advance for the zoom webinar link:
https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_IhtlPqXtQ_-CuPYqEFaEFQ

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Sound of the Nation: Russian-Speaker Integration in Latvia

Event time: 
Friday, November 6, 2020 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Indra Ekmanis, Baltic Sea Fellow, Foreign Policy Research Institute
Event description: 

The European Studies Council and the Baltic Studies Program at Yale present Indra Ekmanis, Baltic Sea Fellow, Foreign Policy Research Institute, who will present the following talk on “Sound of the Nation: Russian-Speaker Integration in Latvia”
Comments by Solvita Denisa-Liepniece, Juris Padegs Fellow, Yale University
Please register for the webinar zoom link: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_8wrN-QlLSZ6d22Qwct8saA
Dr. Indra Ekmanis is the editor of FPRI’s Baltic Bulletin, and a Baltic Sea Fellow in the Eurasia Program. She was previously an editor for public radio’s The World through the ACLS/Mellon Public Fellows Program, where she focused on worldwide migration and European issues. Dr. Ekmanis recently completed a fellowship as a Kennan Institute Title VIII Research Scholar at The Wilson Center. She has a PhD in International Studies from the University of Washington. Her academic research looks at social integration, minority rights, nationalism, civil society and democratic transition, with an area specialization in the Baltic Sea Region and post-Soviet space. She is currently working on an interdisciplinary edited volume on disinformation in the Baltic region.

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Visual Acts of Radical Care: An Exhibition of Feminist Artists-Activists from Central and Eastern Europe

Event time: 
Monday, November 30, 2020 - 12:00am
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Curator, Aniko Szucs (Yale University)
Event description: 

3D Virtual Art Exhibition
Curated by Dr. Aniko Szucs, Postdoctoral Associate and Lecturer in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, Yale University
Featuring the following feminist artists/activists:
Rufina Bazlova
Andi GV
Alevtyna Kakhidze
Cecylia Malik
Masha Svyatogor
To view the 3D virtual exhibit: https://artspaces.kunstmatrix.com/en/exhibition/2306160/visual-acts-of-r…
For easiest viewing-enter fullscreen and click on start guided tour.

Introduction of Exhibition

“In a political situation in which care is both exceptionally necessary and exceptionally underprovided,” writes artivist Harry Josephine Giles, “acts of care begin to look politically radical. To care is to act against the grain of the social and economic orthodoxy: to advocate care is… to advocate a kind of political rupture.” In Central and Eastern Europe, authoritarian regimes and illiberal democracies have been aggressively suppressing solidarity, curiosity, and tolerance by silencing and disenfranchising artists, expelling NGO organizations, and debilitating social movements. Taking a stand against such oppressive trends by building allyship amongst ethnically, racially, religiously varied communities has indeed become an act of “radical care.”

With the global state of populist and nationalist governments taking control, advocacy work and practicing care has become an ethical commitment. Radical care demands that activists, artists, and scholars rethink the conditions of equality, togetherness, and diversity. Radical care proposes mutual recognition and mutual aid; it envisions alternative forms of solidarity and acts of sharing.

The artists presented in this exhibition perform acts of radical care in at least three different ways: by bringing to fore invisible experiences and existences, by becoming protectors instead of protestors, and by daring to expose the radical ruptures in society. Hungarian photographer, Andi GV and Ukrainian visual artist Alevtina Kakhidze both redraw—Andi GV through photography and Kakhidze with pencil and ink—the contours and shades of those who live in liminal geopolitical spaces, dehumanized and unrecognized by the nation states and international organizations. The artworks of Polish artist and artivist Cecylia Malik and the Belarusian artist Masha Svyatogor demonstrate how performances of radical care may transform the position of the activist: protestors, through their affective advocacy work, become protectors of ecological, racial ethnic, labor, and human rights causes. Lastly, this exhibition also proposes that certain protest actions may constitute acts of radical care. By subverting the Belarusian folk embroidery tradition and Poland’s most sacred religious icon in their artivist works, Rufina Bazlova and Polish LGBTQ activists, respectively, turn well-known nationalistic and religious tropes into sites of rupture. In these images the conflicting ideologies are visualized, and—within the utopia of the artworks—perhaps are also reconciled.

Each of these artists succeed in accomplishing the ultimate goal of radical care: they build communities and inspire them to envision new social realities. Through their works, the organizers of this conference and the curators of this exhibition invite you to do the same.

Admission: 
Free
Open To: 
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