General Public

Kate Briggs: Windham-Campbell Prizes Virtual Festival

Event time: 
Wednesday, October 27, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

The seventh in a weekly series on Wednesdays at 12 noon ET featuring 2021 Windham-Campbell Prize Recipients in a 30-40 minute pre-recorded streaming video presentation featuring a live chat box, followed by a Zoom Q&A with that week’s featured writer. Future sessions include:
11/3 – Dionne Brand
11/10 – The Windham-Campbell Lecture by US Poet Laureate Joy Harjo.
Kate Briggs is a writer and translator whose brilliant first book This Little Art (2017) defies categorization. It is at once a memoir, a treatise, and a history, considering Briggs’s own life as a translator from French to English, offering an account of the nature and stakes of translation, and presenting a history of three women translators in the twentieth century. The book articulates and refracts the many strangenesses and paradoxes of translation as a practice and an art. Translation, Briggs shows us, is both lonely and collaborative, disciplined and profoundly educational, a private devotion and a public project. It energizes and frustrates, requiring from its practitioners passion, precision, and an openness to transformation. Briggs is the translator of two volumes of Roland Barthes’s lecture notes at the Collège de France, The Preparation for the Novel (2011) and How to Live Together: Novelistic Simulations of Some Everyday Spaces (2013), and co-translator of Michel Foucault’s Introduction to Kant’s Anthropology (2008). She teaches at the Piet Zwart Institute in Rotterdam, Netherlands and is currently working on a new book: a novel-essay titled The Long Form.
Visit windhamcampbell.org for more information about Kate and the other 2021 recipients!

Admission: 
Free
Open To: 

The Living Image: 50 Years of Photography and the Struggle for Social Justice in Italy

Event time: 
Thursday, May 20, 2021 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

An Art & Protest zoom webinar with Tano D’Amico
Registration: https://bit.ly/3vZ6na3
D’Amico is one of the world’s best-known photographers of social movements. Since his work for the radical Italian newspaper Lotta Continua in the 1970s, Tano has fought to counter the mainstream media’s image of social movements by capturing the beauty and passion of the struggle for social justice on the part of workers, feminists, gay rights activists, Roma and Sinti, the anti-globalization movement, and many other causes. In this special session of Art & Protest, Tano will lead us in a conversation about the power and agency of photography—as a tool of criminalization, exclusion, and repression on the part of authorities as well as an active, constitutive force capable of intervening directly in social reality to shape the identify of social movements and ensure their ultimate vindication in the struggle for history and memory. At stake is the irruption of a new image, a new kind of subversive beauty, carried forward by the voices, gestures, desires, and actions of a new set of actors entering on the historical stage.
Sponsored by Beinecke Library, the Postwar Culture Working Group, and the Whitney Humanities Center. For more information about the ART & PROTEST SERIES or to join the mailing list, write to kevin.repp@yale.edu

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
Open To: 

Mondays at Beinecke: Lucy Schwob and Suzanne Malherbe with Jeffrey H. Jackson

Event time: 
Monday, May 3, 2021 - 4:00pm to 4:30pm
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Event description: 

Jeffrey H. Jackson, is the author of “Paper Bullets: Two Artists Who Risked Their Lives to Defy the Nazis,” based on research in the Beinecke Library for the book.
Zoom webinar registration: https://bit.ly/31TtTs7
Jackson is the first to tell a little-known WWII story of an anti-Nazi campaign undertaken by two French women in his gripping book. Lucy Schwob and Suzanne Malherbe were gender norm-defying artists, better known by their artist names Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore, who used their art to courageously defy the Nazi occupation of their chosen home, the British Channel Island of Jersey. Over the course of four years, Schwob and Malherbe wrote and distributed anti-Hitler notes, insults and calls to desert – a tactic known as “Paper Bullets”- written under the disguise of a Nazi soldier called “The Soldier with No Name,” meant to sway other soldiers from believing in the Nazi rhetoric.
Schwob and Malherbe were braver for who they were: lesbian partners known for their provocative photography - Lucy was also half-Jewish and they had Communist ties. The pair were eventually betrayed by a neighbor in 1944 and sentenced to death for their actions; however even in jail, they continued to fight the Nazis by reaching out to other prisoners—including imprisoned German soldiers—to spread a message of hope. Jackson, a professor of History at Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, and an expert on European history and culture, vividly tells the hidden history of these two heroines, uncovering never before seen research and accurately describing the day-to-day life of civilians living in occupied territories and the tough decisions and sacrifices they constantly had to make to survive.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
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The Asia Olympics: Past Achievements & Future Goals

Event time: 
Monday, April 19, 2021 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Susan E. Brownell
University of Missouri- St. Louis
William Kelly
Yale University
John Horne
Waseda UniversitY

203-432-0061

Britain and the EU after Brexit

Event time: 
Monday, April 19, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Speaker/Performer: 
Vernon Bogdanor, Professor of Government at the Institute of Contemporary British History, King’s College, London
Event description: 

Please register at http://bit.ly/BritainEUafterBrexit
VERNON BOGDANOR CBE is Professor of Government at the Institute of Contemporary British History, King’s College, London. He was formerly for many years Professor of Government at Oxford University. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, an Honorary Fellow of the Institute for Advanced Legal Studies, a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, and a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences. He has been an adviser to a number of governments, including those of Albania, Czech Republic, Hungary, Kosovo, Israel, Mauritius. Romania, Slovakia, Sweden and Trinidad. He has written numerous books, including Beyond Brexit: Towards a British Constitution, and Britain and Europe in a Troubled World.

Sponsored by the George Herbert Walker, Jr. Lecture Fund at Yale University, the European Studies Council, and Program in European Union Studies

VIRTUAL: 2034: A Novel of the Next World War

Event time: 
Wednesday, March 10, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

The Jackson Institute for Global Affairs will host a virtual discussion with Visiting Fellow Adm. Jim Stavridis regarding his new book—his tenth, but his first work of fiction.
Stavridis is the former Supreme Allied Commander of NATO and Dean of The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He is currently an Operating Executive at The Carlyle Group.
2034: A Novel of the Next World War, is a geopolitical thriller that imagines a naval clash between the United States and China in the South China Sea, and the path from there to a global confrontation. Featured as a six-part series in Wired Magazine, 2034 is written as a disturbingly plausible work of speculative fiction. The novel takes us inside the minds of American, Chinese, Iranian, Russian, and Indian officials, as a series of miscalculations on all sides leads the world into an intensifying international storm.
How can the United States and China prevent strategic competition from spiraling into conflict? How can works of fiction inspire creative, innovative approaches to Sino-American relations?
The conversation will be moderated by Paul Kennedy, J. Richardson Dilworth Professor of History and Global Affairs.
Jackson Visiting Fellows are distinguished practitioners invited to participate in an immersive multi-day program on the Yale campus, highlighting their extraordinary contributions to global affairs. They enrich the Jackson and broader university community through attending classes, giving public talks, and interacting with students and faculty through a variety of engaging events.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

Greece Too: Persephone’s Rape and Sexual Violence in 21st Century Greece.

Event time: 
Monday, March 15, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Sissy Vovou
Event description: 

A discussion with Sissy Vovou, Activist, Feminist Movement Το Μωβ and Maria Pentrarki, Queen’s University Belfast.

203-432-0061

The 1825 Decembrist Revolt in Russia and the Greek Revolution

Event time: 
Monday, March 1, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Paul Bushkovitch
Event description: 

Paul Bushkovitch is Reuben Post Halleck Prof of History at Yale University.
Paul Bushkovitch received his Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1975. He specializes in Russia before the eighteenth century. He is the author of The Merchants of Moscow 1580-1650 (1980), Religion and Society in Russia, the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (1992), (with Maija Jansson and Nikolai Rogozhin) “England and the North: the Russian Embassy of 1613-1614,” Memoirs of the American Philosophical Society 210 (1994), Peter the Great (2001), Peter the Great: The Struggle for Power, 1671-1725 (2001), and A Concise History of Russia, Cambridge, 2012.
Co-Sponsored by the Hellenic Studies Program, European Studies Council, and Program on Russian, Eurasian, and East European Studies.
Part of The Greek Revolution Across the Globe, Lecture Series.

203-432-0061

The Heart of Fiction

Event time: 
Tuesday, March 16, 2021 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Pulitzer Prize finalist Hernan Diaz to deliver spring 2021 Finzi-Contini Lecture
Why dwell on made-up stories? Why make them up in the first place? Can fiction, that pack of lies, aspire to some form of truth? Award-winning novelist Hernan Diaz will present a Finzi-Contini lecture titled “The Heart of Fiction” on Tuesday, March 16, at 4:30 pm EST via Zoom.
Hernan Diaz is the author of the novel In the Distance (2017), a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award, a Publisher’s Weekly Top Ten Book of the Year, and winner of the Saroyan International Prize, the Cabell Award, the Prix Page America, and the New American Voices Award. Diaz has received a Whiting Award and fellowships from Bread Loaf and the MacDowell Colony. He has also written a study of Borges’s influence on North American literature, Borges, between History and Eternity (2012), and published work in Cabinet, the New York Times, the Kenyon Review, Playboy, Granta, and the Paris Review. Born in Argentina, Diaz was raised in Sweden and studied in London and in New York, where he now serves as associate director of the Hispanic Institute at Columbia University and editor of the Revista Hispánica Moderna.
The Finzi-Contini Lectureship honors Bianca M. Finzi-Contini Calabresi, a scholar of European literature and a native of Ferrara who left fascist Italy for the United States. The lectureship was founded by her sons, the Honorable Guido Calabresi, Judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, and the late Dr. Paul Calabresi. The distinguished list of past lecturers includes Tzvetan Todorov, Orhan Pamuk, Maxine Hong Kingston, Amitav Ghosh, and Masha Gessen. The lectures are devoted to any aspect of comparative literature and culture.
This event is cosponsored by The Yale Review.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

203-432-0670

Population Movements Under Lockdown: Refugees and Migrants in Greece and Lebanon

Event time: 
Monday, February 22, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Join us as Epaminondas Farmakis, founder of HumanRights360, and Sally Abi Khalil, Country Director of Oxfam in Lebanon, bring us up to date on the refugee and migrant experience during the Covid19 year in Greece and Lebanon. As the political and social landscape of Greece shifted with a new conservative government, the military response to the expulsion of refugees from Turkey in February 2012, the banning of the neo-Nazi and anti-immigrant party Golden Dawn, and the burning of Moria camp on Lesvos, we revisit the ongoing humanitarian crisis now under the worst medical threat of the century. Lebanon’s proximity to Syria, the apocalyptic explosion at Beirut’s harbor, and the exacerbation of chronic political corruption that has brought the country’s economy to the brink of collapse, call for a reappraisal of and refocusing on this historic demographic shift that has been obscured by the pandemic and the concurrent political turmoil in the United States.
• Epaminondas Farmakis, Founder of HumanRights360
• Sally Abi Khalil, Country Director of Oxfam in Lebanon
Moderated by:
• Kaveh Khoshnood, Yale School of Public Health
• George Syrimis, Hellenic Studies Program, Yale University

203-432-0061
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