General Public

Screening of The Bell Tolls for the Barefooted | Complexities of Resistance: Partisan Films from Eastern Europe and the Balkans Film Series

Event time: 
Saturday, February 17, 2024 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Humanities Quadrangle HQ, L01 See map
320 York Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Complexities of Resistance: Partisan Films from Eastern Europe and the Balkans Film Series presents a film screening of THE BELL TOLLS FOR THE BAREFOOTED (Zvony Pre Bosych)
Czechoslovakia [in Slovak], 1965. 96 minutes. 35mm print. Slovak Film Institute, Bratislava.
Directed by Stanislav Barabáš

on Saturday, February 17, 2024, 7:00 p.m.
Humanities Quadrangle, Screening Room L01
320 York Street, New Haven, CT 06511
Free and open to the public | All films will be shown with English subtitles

Stanislav Barabáš devoted a significant part of his career to representations of the Slovak National Uprising (August-October 1944). This film, the finest of his works about partisan struggle, depicts a singular quartet made up of two isolated and fearful partisans, a captured German soldier, and a woman whose encounters with the brutality of war have drained her life of all meaning.

Sponsors:
Edward J. and Dorothy Clarke Kempf Memorial Fund; Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies Program; European Studies Council; Whitney Humanities Center; Yale Film Archive; Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures; and Film and Media Studies Program

About the Film Series: In the aftermath of World War II, several European states started reconstructing and reimagining their identities and recent histories by producing a vast number of films that celebrated and commemorated their guerrilla struggles against fascism. These films ranged in scope and ambition from intimate psychological dramas to overblown military spectacles, from elegiac recollections to pure pulp fiction. Similar to Hollywood westerns, partisan films were the defining genre of the socialist film industry for a significant period. Moreover, in the late 60s and early 70s, both genres reinvented themselves and underwent a political revision that ended their respective “classical periods.” Despite being hugely successful in their domestic markets and often cinematically accomplished, many examples of the partisan films never traveled abroad, and most film prints today remain locked up and in dire need of preservation in various national film archives. Aside from a handful of canonical works, the majority of films we will screen have never been shown in the U.S.

Admission: 
Free
Open To: 

Screening of Don’t Look Back, My Son | Complexities of Resistance: Partisan Films from Eastern Europe and the Balkans Film Series

Event time: 
Saturday, February 3, 2024 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Humanities Quadrangle HQ, L01 See map
320 York Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Complexities of Resistance: Partisan Films from Eastern Europe and the Balkans Film Series presents a film screening of DON’T LOOK BACK, MY SON (Ne Okreći Se, Sine)
SR Croatia, 1956. 111 minutes. 35mm print. Croatian Cinematheque, Zagreb.
Directed by Branko Bauer

on Saturday, February 03, 2024, 7:00 p.m.
Humanities Quadrangle, Screening Room L01
320 York Street, New Haven, CT 06511
Free and open to the public | All films will be shown with English subtitles

A partisan (played by Yugoslav acting giant Bert Sotlar) is faced with the dual tasks of rescuing his son from a boarding school run by Croatian fascists, and of liberating the boy from the ideology with which he has been inculcated. Bauer’s masterpiece is at once a superb family melodrama and a probing investigation into the nature of political conviction.

Sponsors:
Edward J. and Dorothy Clarke Kempf Memorial Fund; Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies Program; European Studies Council; Whitney Humanities Center; Yale Film Archive; Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures; and Film and Media Studies Program

About the Film Series: In the aftermath of World War II, several European states started reconstructing and reimagining their identities and recent histories by producing a vast number of films that celebrated and commemorated their guerrilla struggles against fascism. These films ranged in scope and ambition from intimate psychological dramas to overblown military spectacles, from elegiac recollections to pure pulp fiction. Similar to Hollywood westerns, partisan films were the defining genre of the socialist film industry for a significant period. Moreover, in the late 60s and early 70s, both genres reinvented themselves and underwent a political revision that ended their respective “classical periods.” Despite being hugely successful in their domestic markets and often cinematically accomplished, many examples of the partisan films never traveled abroad, and most film prints today remain locked up and in dire need of preservation in various national film archives. Aside from a handful of canonical works, the majority of films we will screen have never been shown in the U.S.

Admission: 
Free
Open To: 

Screening of The Pine Tree on the Mountain | Complexities of Resistance: Partisan Films from Eastern Europe and the Balkans Film Series

Event time: 
Saturday, March 30, 2024 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Humanities Quadrangle HQ, L01 See map
320 York Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Complexities of Resistance: Partisan Films from Eastern Europe and the Balkans Film Series presents a film screening of THE PINE TREE ON THE MOUNTAIN (U Gori Raste Zelen Bor)
SR Croatia, 1971. 94 minutes. 35mm print. Croatian Cinematheque, Zagreb.
Directed by Antun Vrdoljak

on Saturday, March 30, 2024, 3:00 p.m.
Humanities Quadrangle, Screening Room L01
320 York Street, New Haven, CT 06511
Free and open to the public | All films will be shown with English subtitles

Like When You Hear the Bells (1969), Vrdoljak’s previous partisan film, The Pine Tree on the Mountain focuses on the multiple and sometimes conflicting loyalties of those embroiled in Yugoslavia’s partisan struggle. With the sole exception of a political commissar sent from Zagreb to bring discipline to the unit, all the fighters on either side are also peasants, fighting as much for their villages and families as for any political ideology.

Sponsors:
Edward J. and Dorothy Clarke Kempf Memorial Fund; Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies Program; European Studies Council; Whitney Humanities Center; Yale Film Archive; Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures; and Film and Media Studies Program

About the Film Series: In the aftermath of World War II, several European states started reconstructing and reimagining their identities and recent histories by producing a vast number of films that celebrated and commemorated their guerrilla struggles against fascism. These films ranged in scope and ambition from intimate psychological dramas to overblown military spectacles, from elegiac recollections to pure pulp fiction. Similar to Hollywood westerns, partisan films were the defining genre of the socialist film industry for a significant period. Moreover, in the late 60s and early 70s, both genres reinvented themselves and underwent a political revision that ended their respective “classical periods.” Despite being hugely successful in their domestic markets and often cinematically accomplished, many examples of the partisan films never traveled abroad, and most film prints today remain locked up and in dire need of preservation in various national film archives. Aside from a handful of canonical works, the majority of films we will screen have never been shown in the U.S.

Admission: 
Free
Open To: 

Screening of White Bird with a Black Mark | Complexities of Resistance: Partisan Films from Eastern Europe and the Balkans Film Series

Event time: 
Saturday, January 20, 2024 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Humanities Quadrangle HQ, L01 See map
320 York Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Complexities of Resistance: Partisan Films from Eastern Europe and the Balkans Film Series presents a film screening of WHITE BIRD WITH A BLACK MARK (Bilyi Ptakh z Chornoyu Oznakoyu)
Ukrainian SSR, 1970. 99 minutes. DCP. Oleksandr Dovzhenko Film Center, Kyiv.
Directed by Yuri Ilyenko

on Saturday, January 20, 2024, 7:00 p.m.
Humanities Quadrangle, Screening Room L01
320 York Street, New Haven, CT 06511
Free and open to the public | All films will be shown with English subtitles

Ilyenko’s landmark film follows the Zvonars, a family of poor musicians, as personal and geopolitical crises, including partisan warfare, collide across the course of the tumultuous 1940s. Set in the region of
Bukovina, on the border between Ukraine and Romania, Ilyenko’s folkloric vision produces one of the greatest works of the Ukrainian poetic cinema movement.

Sponsors:
Edward J. and Dorothy Clarke Kempf Memorial Fund; Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies Program; European Studies Council; Whitney Humanities Center; Yale Film Archive; Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures; and Film and Media Studies Program

About the Film Series: In the aftermath of World War II, several European states started reconstructing and reimagining their identities and recent histories by producing a vast number of films that celebrated and commemorated their guerrilla struggles against fascism. These films ranged in scope and ambition from intimate psychological dramas to overblown military spectacles, from elegiac recollections to pure pulp fiction. Similar to Hollywood westerns, partisan films were the defining genre of the socialist film industry for a significant period. Moreover, in the late 60s and early 70s, both genres reinvented themselves and underwent a political revision that ended their respective “classical periods.” Despite being hugely successful in their domestic markets and often cinematically accomplished, many examples of the partisan films never traveled abroad, and most film prints today remain locked up and in dire need of preservation in various national film archives. Aside from a handful of canonical works, the majority of films we will screen have never been shown in the U.S.

Admission: 
Free
Open To: 

Musical Visualization, The Path to Creator's Subconscious, a Lecture-Concert

Event time: 
Friday, March 29, 2024 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
William L. Harkness Hall WLH, Sudler Hall See map
100 Wall Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Dr. George Borisov (USA) and Dr. Konstantin Semilakovs (Austria)
Event description: 

Musical Visualization, The Path to Creator’s Subconscious, a Lecture-Concert, featuring Dr. George Borisov (USA) and Dr. Konstantin Semilakovs (Austria)

Location: Sudler Hall, 2nd fl, William L. Harkness Hall, 100 Wall St.

Visualization of music allows us to sneak into deep level of the creative process and explore something that may not be the composer’s deliberate intention but perhaps dictating by unknown, mystical powers. We invite you to discover with us the amazing meanings and nuances of some controversial music canvases by Alexander Scriabin, Claude Debussy, and Olivier Messiaen.

Sponsored By: The Edward J. and Dorothy Clarke Kempf Memorial Fund and the European Studies Council of the Yale MacMillan Center

Dr. George Borisov was born and educated in Russia, a citizen of the USA since 1992. Concert pianist, educator, and musicologist. In focus of my musicological interests are reflections in music of the 20th century the processes of Russian Empire disintegration. Author of a few books, music albums, and article published in the USA, Russia, Australia, and Argentina. I have been given lectures and concerts at universities and other organizations in the United States, countries of the European Union, Australia, and China.

Dr. Konstantin Semilakovs, born 1984 in Riga, Latvia, is a classical pianist, piano professor at the University of Music and Performing Arts in Vienna and first prize winner of the International Piano Competition in Porto. He is particularly interested in studying the phenomenon of color perception in the classical piano repertoire as well as in synaesthetic performance of the music of 19th and 20th centuries.

Konstantin Semilakovs has appeared as a soloist and chamber musician at the International Beethoven Festival Bonn, the Braunschweig Classix Festival, and at the music festivals of Schleswig-Holstein and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. Semilakovs was awarded the Classical Music Prize of WDR Radio and the City of Münster, the Hans Sikorski Memorial Award, and the Sponsorship Award of the Ingolstadt Concert Association.

Semilakovs studied with Wolfgang Manz at the University of Music in Nuremberg and with Michael Wladkowski at the École Normale de Musique Alfred Cortot in Paris.

Preceding the professorship in Vienna, he taught at the Universities of Music in Salzburg, Nuremberg and Regensburg.

Admission: 
Free
Open To: 

Remembering Vilna: The Jerusalem of Lithuania

Event time: 
Wednesday, February 7, 2024 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

The REEES Program at Yale, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, and the Yale Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies present “Remembering Vilna: The Jerusalem of Lithuania.”

“Remembering Vilna: The Jerusalem of Lithuania” is the third season of the Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies’ podcast “Those Who Were There: Voices from the Holocaust.” This latest season is a ten-episode audio documentary that was produced in collaboration with the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research in New York. “Remembering Vilna” tells the story of the destruction of the Jewish community of Vilna, Poland (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania) through the testimonies of survivors and the diaries of Herman Kruk. It discusses the rise of anti-Semitism between the two world wars, the invasion of Lithuania by the Soviet Union followed by the German occupation, the creation of the ghettos, the massacre of the Jews of Vilna, and the end of the Second World War and its consequences.

About the speakers:

As lead producer of the series Remembering Vilna: the Jerusalem of Lithuania, Nahanni Rous listened to more than 60 testimonies of Vilna-born Holocaust survivors and wove together the stories that make up the tapestry of experiences in this ten-part audio documentary about Jewish life in Vilna leading up to, during and in the immediate aftermath of World War Two. Nahanni also hosts and produces “Can We Talk?,” the podcast of the Jewish Women’s Archive, which explores the intersection of gender and Jewish culture. She is a MacDowell fellow, an amateur cellist, and lives with her family in Washington, DC.

Journalist and author Eric Marcus is co-producer of Those Who Were There, a podcast drawn from Yale University’s Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies, including this third season of the podcast, “Remembering Vilna.” Eric is also the founder and host of the award-winning Making Gay History podcast, which mines his decades-old audio archive of rare interviews to bring LGBTQ history to life through the voices of the people who lived it. Eric is the author and co-author of a dozen books, including, Making Gay History, Is It A Choice?, Why Suicide?, and Breaking the Surface, the #1 New York Times bestselling autobiography of Olympic diving champion Greg Louganis.

Eleanor Reissa, the host of the Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimony’s Those Who Were There, is a Tony Award nominated director; a Broadway actress (Indecent); a television and film actress (HBO’s Plot Against America, AMC’s Walking Dead, and the upcoming series Die Zwieflers, for German television.) She is an award-winning playwright, choreographer; and a critically acclaimed singer in English and Yiddish, performing in every major musical venue in New York City and in festivals around the world. Her book, The Letters Project: A Daughter’s Journey was recently published by Post Hill Press.

Samuel Kassow, the Charles H. Northam Professor of History at Trinity College, holds a Ph.D. from Princeton University. He has been a visiting professor at many institutions and was on the team of scholars that planned the POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw. Among his various publications is Who will Write our History: Emanuel Ringelblum and the Secret Ghetto Archive (Indiana, 2007), which received the Orbis Prize of the AAASS, the Damals Prize in Germany for the best monograph of the year, and which was a finalist for a National Jewish Book Award. It has been translated into eight languages. He is on the team of scholars chosen by Yad Vashem to write a one volume history of the Holocaust in Poland. Professor Kassow’s translation of Rachel Auerbach’s Warsaw ghetto memoirs will be published next year by the National Yiddish Book Center.

Admission: 
Free
This event will be in person and on Zoom.
Open To: 

ESC-YLS Colloquium: Rethinking Democracy in and for the European Union

Event time: 
Tuesday, April 9, 2024 - 4:15pm to 5:45pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

ESC-YLS Colloquium #4: Rethinking Democracy in and for the European Union

Prof. Michael Wilkinson (London School of Economics)
Prof. Vivien A. Schmidt (Boston University)
Discussant and Chair: Prof. Samuel Moyn (Yale University)

Michael A. Wilkinson is Professor at LSE Law. He works in the areas of constitutional theory, European integration, and legal, political, and social theory. His monograph on Authoritarian Liberalism and the Transformation of Modern Europe (OUP, 2021) was selected as one of the ‘key books of the year on the future of Europe’ by the Review of Democracy. He recently co-edited a collection on a new approach to the study of constitutional law, The Cambridge Handbook on the Material Constitution (CUP, 2023). He has held visiting professorships at Cornell, Paris II, the National University of Singapore, and Keio University, Tokyo, and his work has been translated into Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, and Turkish.

Vivien A. Schmidt is Professor Emerita of International Relations and Political Science, Jean Monnet Professor of European Integration and Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Europe at Boston University, where she taught from 1998 to 2023. Prof. Schmidt is currently Visiting Fellow in the Schuman Center at the European University Institute in Florence, Honorary Professor at LUISS Guido Carli University in Rome, and Senior Fellow in the Zoe Institute. Over the years, she has held visiting and affiliate positions at a number of European universities. In addition to LUISS University, these include Sciences Po in Paris, the Free University of Berlin, the Free University of Brussels, the European University Institute in Florence, Oxford University, the Max Planck Institute in Cologne, and Harvard University’s Center for European Studies, where she co-chaired the EU study group from 2008 to 2023. Professor Schmidt has published extensively on European political economy, institutions, and democracy as well as on the role of ideas and discourse in political analysis (discursive institutionalism). Her latest book is Europe’s Crisis of Legitimacy: Governing by Rules and Ruling by Numbers in the Eurozone (Oxford, 2020) which received the Best Book Award (2021) from the American Political Science Association’s Ideas, Knowledge, Politics section and Honorable Mention for the Best Book Award (2019-2020) of the European Union Studies Association. Recent honors and awards include decoration as Chevalier in the French Legion of Honor, recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award of the European Union Studies Association, and a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship for her current project on the ‘rhetoric of discontent,’ a transatlantic investigation of populism.

Samuel Moyn is Chancellor Kent Professor of Law and History at Yale University. He received a doctorate in modern European history from the University of California-Berkeley in 2000 and a law degree from Harvard University in 2001. He came to Yale from Harvard University, where he was Jeremiah Smith, Jr. Professor of Law and Professor of History. Before this, he spent 13 years in the Columbia University history department, where he was most recently James Bryce Professor of European Legal History. His areas of interest in legal scholarship include international law, human rights, the law of war, and legal thought, in both historical and current perspective. In intellectual history, he has worked on a diverse range of subjects, especially twentieth-century European moral and political theory.

Part of a colloquium series on the future of European integration co-organized by Yale’s European Studies Council and the Yale Law School European Law Association.

Event will be in person and on Zoom.

Visit the ESC-YLS Colloquium Series page to learn more about all of the events: https://europeanstudies.macmillan.yale.edu/events/esc-yls-colloquium-series

Open To: 

ESC-YLS Colloquium: Future of Geopolitical Europe in a World of Energy Dependency

Event time: 
Monday, March 4, 2024 - 4:15pm to 5:45pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

ESC-YLS Colloquium #3: Future of Geopolitical Europe in a World of Energy Dependency

Anatole Boute (Chinese University of Hong Kong)
Kong Chyong (Columbia University)
Discussant: Danae Azaria (NYU)
Chair: Isabela Mares (Yale)

Anatole Boute is a law professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, specialising in energy, climate, and investment law. He is the author of Energy Security along the New Silk Road (CUP 2019) and Russian Electricity and Energy Investment Law (Brill Nijhoff 2015), and is a member of the IBA Academic Advisory Group on Energy, Environment, Natural Resources, and Infrastructure Law. He was admitted to the Brussels Bar in 2009, and regularly assists development banks, governments, and investors on questions of energy and climate regulation. His research on the energy crisis has garnered attention from media outlets including CNBC, Al Jazeera, CGTN, and the Financial Times.

Dr Kong Chyong is an energy economist and policy analyst with a strong background and more than 15 years of experience applying economics and operational research methods to energy and climate policy questions. Kong’s research interests include energy system economics and modelling to understand deep decarbonisation pathways and large-scale power and global gas market modelling. He also works on the economics and geopolitics of Russian natural gas exports, focusing on Russo-Ukrainian bilateral relations and impacts on Europe and global gas markets. Kong holds a PhD in Energy Economics and Policy and an MPhil in Technology Policy from the University of Cambridge. Before his studies at Cambridge University, Kong was a researcher at the National Academy of Sciences in Ukraine.

Dr Danae Azaria is Associate Professor of Public International Law at the Faculty of Laws, University College London (UCL), and the Principal Investigator of the ‘State Silence’ project funded by a Grant of the EU’s European Research Council. She is a laureate of the Guggenheim Prize in Public International Law (2017) for her monograph ‘Treaties on Transit of Energy via Pipelines and Countermeasures’ (OUP), the Book Reviews editor of the British Yearbook of International Law, Co-Rapporteur of the ILA Committee on Submarine Pipelines and Cables, and member of the ILA Committee on Use of Force by Invitation. She is a member of the Advisory Panel of Public International Law of the British Institute of International and Comparative Law, and has held prestigious fellowships including currently as Senior Global Hauser Fellow at NYU Law School (2023-2024), and previously as Visiting Scholar at Harvard Law School (2023) and Senior Humboldt Fellow, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (Humboldt University Berlin, 2019-2021). In addition to her scholarship on international energy law and State responsibility, she has written widely in the field of international law, inter alia on the International Law Commission, the law of treaties, law of the sea, the intersection between trade and security, and acquiescence.

Isabela Mares specializes in the comparative politics of Europe. Professor Mares has written extensively on labor market and social policy reforms, the political economy of taxation, electoral clientelism, reforms limiting electoral corruption. Her current research examines the political responses to antiparliamentarism in both contemporary and historical settings.

Part of a colloquium series on the future of European integration co-organized by Yale’s European Studies Council and the Yale Law School European Law Association.

Event will be in person and on Zoom.

Visit the ESC-YLS Colloquium Series page to learn more about all of the events: https://europeanstudies.macmillan.yale.edu/events/esc-yls-colloquium-series

Admission: 
Free
Event will be in person and on Zoom. Register to attend via Zoom
Open To: 

ESC-YLS Colloquium: EU Borders in a Post-Colonial World

Event time: 
Monday, February 19, 2024 - 4:15pm to 5:45pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

ESC-YLS Colloquium #2: EU Borders in a Post-Colonial World

The so-called European “refugee crisis” of 2015 and its aftermath have revealed the true face of the EU: a fortress keeping out third-country nationals from the former colonies leading to thousands of migrants dying in the Mediterranean or at the Belarusian borders, when they are not tortured in the Libyan prisons – financed with EU money. On the other hand, the EU has recently been praised for its solidarity with the Ukrainian refugees welcoming them on the basis of the temporary protection directive although some have denounced the racial selection behind it. This panel aims to discuss the EU as a vehicle of ‘imperial amnesia’ in light of what is happening at EU borders. The speakers will discuss the mechanisms and narrative deployed by the EU and its Member States to keep some migrants out and let others in, particularly in the broader context of post-colonialism and Eurowhiteness.

Prof. Dimitry Kochenov (Central European University)
Dr. Hans Kundnani (NYU / Royal Institute of International Affairs)
Chaired by Prof. Seyla Benhabib (Yale University / Columbia University)

Dimitry V. Kochenov leads the Rule of Law research at CEU Democracy Institute in Budapest and is Professor of Legal Studies at CEU Department of Legal Studies in Vienna. This spring he is also Malyi Fellow at Chicago Law School. Prof. Kochenov focuses on citizenship, justice, colonialism and the principles of public law and held visiting positions and fellowships at Princeton, Oxford, NYU Law School, LUISS, Turin, Osaka and UNAM inter many alia. He advises governments and international organizations in the matters of his interest and seved as the founding chairman of the Investment Mirgation Council (Geneva). His latest book Citizenship (MIT Press) was translated into several languages and reviewed in the NYRB.

Hans Kundnani is a visiting fellow at the Remarque Insitute at New York University and an Open Society Foundations Ideas Workshop fellow. He was previously the director of the Europe programme at the Royal Institute of International Affairs (Chatham House) in London. His most recent book is Eurowhiteness. Culture, Empire and Race in the European Project (2023).

Seyla Benhabib is the Eugene Meyer Professor of Political Science and Philosophy Emerita at Yale University where she taught from 2001 to 2020. She is currently Senior Research Fellow and Professor of Law Adjunct at Columbia University, and Affiliate Faculty in the Department of Philosophy. She is also a Senior Fellow at Columbia University’s Center for Contemporary Critical Thought. She is currently at work on a Monograph for Polity Press called “At the Margins of the Modern State” and has edited a collection of articles with Ayelet Shachar on Migration and Refugee topics called, Lawless Zones, Rightless Subjects: Migration and Asylum New Border Regimes.

Part of a colloquium series on the future of European integration co-organized by Yale’s European Studies Council and the Yale Law School European Law Association.

Event will be in person and on Zoom.

Visit the ESC-YLS Colloquium Series page to learn more about all of the events: https://europeanstudies.macmillan.yale.edu/events/esc-yls-colloquium-series

Admission: 
Free
Register to attend via Zoom:
Open To: 

A conversation with Arman Tatoyan on the Artsakh Nagorno-Karabakh conflict

Event time: 
Friday, November 17, 2023 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Arman Tatoyan holds his Master of Laws from University of Pennsylvania Law School; he obtained his LLM and Ph.D. from YSU, Department of Criminal Procedure and Criminalistics. Mr. Tatoyan is the former Human Rights Defender (Ombudsman) of Armenia and an Ad hoc Judge in the European Court of Human Rights. He served as the Deputy Minister of Justice of the Republic of Armenia and also has been the Deputy Representative of the Government of Armenia before the European Court of Human Rights. Mr. Tatoyan is also a permanent international advisor in the Council of Europe. He has been the advisor to the President of the Constitutional Court of Republic of Armenia and has been involved in different working groups for drafting laws and strategies for Armenia. He lectures in YSU and AUA, as well as in the Academy of Justice of Armenia.

Admission: 
Free

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