General Public

Pursuing Justice and Accountability in Ukraine, Two Years on from Russia's 2022 Invasion

Event time: 
Monday, February 12, 2024 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Watson Center WTS, A51 See map
60 Sachem Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Janine di Giovanni is a multi-award winning journalist and author, and CEO/Executive Director of The Reckoning Project. Janine was a war reporter for nearly three decades, from the first Palestinian intifada in the early 1990s to the siege of Sarajevo; the Rwandan genocide; the brutal wars in Sierra Leone, Somalia, Ivory Coast and Liberia to Chechnya, Afghanistan, Pakistan. She reported extensively in Iraq pre and post invasion, the Arab Spring, and finally Syria. Her field work for her most recent book took her to Gaza, Iraq, Egypt and Syria. In 2020, the American Academy of Arts and Letters awarded her their highest non fiction prize, the Blake Dodd. Janine served as a Senior Fellow and Professor at Yale University’s Jackson Institute for Global Affairs from 2018-2022 where she taught two human rights courses which looked at eight different conflicts in depth: Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, Sierra Leone, Yemen, Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan. She also taught a course at Yale in Reporting War for Humanitarians. In 2016, CNN made a short video about her life and work when the International Women’s’ Media Foundation gave her their prestigious Courage in Journalism Prize.

For her most recent project, Janine founded and directs The Reckoning Project, a transitional justice organization that trains researchers in Ukraine to collect testimonies that can be used in court. Through her work as a conflict journalist, Janine has experienced firsthand the frustration when testimonies collected directly from victims are inadmissible in courts. So, in partnership with Peter Pomerantsev, she’s created a team of legal experts and journalists to bridge the gap between journalism and justice.

With the second anniversary of Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine, it is worth taking stock of the status of various efforts to pursue justice for international crimes. Di Giovanni, whose organization The Reckoning Project supports testimony collection and preservation, will address the success, challenges, and opportunities in this realm

With support of the Program on Peace and Development, the Genocide Studies Program and the Schell Center for International Human Rights

Admission: 
Free

203-432-0061

"In all and for all”: who is included in Orthodox Christian liturgy?

Event time: 
Friday, February 23, 2024 - 8:00am to 5:15pm
Location: 
Miller Hall PROS406 See map
406 Prospect Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
multiple speakers
Event description: 

This daylong panel will be convened by ISM fellow Dr. Nadia Kizenko, and the speakers include:

Susan Ashbrook Harvey, Brown University
Nicholas Denysenko, Valparaiso University
Patricia Fann Bouteneff, Axia Women
Carrie Frederick Frost, Western Washington University
Nina Glibetic, Notre Dame
Vassa Larin, Vienna, host of “Coffee with Sister Vassa”
Ashley Purpura, Purdue University
Teva Regule, Boston College
Vera Shevzov, Smith College

Orthodox Christian liturgy seems to be one of the most “traditional” traditions. Its emphasis on ordained clerical authority (limited to able-bodied males) may obscure how others participate—or might participate—in liturgy. Women have shaped the liturgical act of collective remembering and memory making through composing liturgical texts, painting icons, or as witnesses to the events often sacralized through liturgical commemoration. How might reflecting on the embodied, sensorial, and physical experience of liturgy serve as a resource for theologically affirming marginalized groups more holistically?

This workshop looks beneath the surface of Orthodox liturgy. Leading scholars of Orthodox liturgy and liturgical arts, theology, and history, will come together to ask such questions as: whose voices are heard in liturgy, how, and by whom? How are these voices granted value in the event? How do persons attending liturgy contribute? How is their contribution valued, and by whom?

Our re-examination will draw on liturgical rites from antiquity to the present to consider what more inclusive rites might look like. It will conclude with a Vespers sung in Marquand Chapel.

SCHEDULE

8-8:45 a.m. breakfast
8:45-9 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks from Nadia Kizenko, Yale University ISM Fellow (Professor of History at UAlbany)

9-10:45 a.m. Panel I: Perspectives from History

Panel I chair: Teresa Berger, Yale University ISM
Susan Ashbrook Harvey, Brown University
Nina Glibetic, Notre Dame
Vera Shevzov, Smith College

15-minute break

11 a.m-12:45 p.m. Panel II: Liturgy According to Liturgists
Panel II chair: Samantha Slabaugh, Yale University ISM
Nicholas Denysenko, Valparaiso University
Vassa Larin, Vienna, host of “Coffee with Sister Vassa”
Teva Regule, Boston College

12:45-1:45 p.m.: lunch.

1:45-3:15 p.m. Panel III: Gender and Power
Panel III chair: Maria Doerfler, Yale University Religious Studies
Patricia Bouteneff, Axia Women
Carrie Frederick Frost, Western Washington University
Ashley Purpura, Purdue University

3:15-3:30 p.m. Concluding Remarks and Future Projects

4:15-5:15 p.m. Great Vespers in Marquand Chapel

Admission: 
Free

Open To: 

Gendering Democratic Theory from an Intersectional Perspective

Event time: 
Friday, February 9, 2024 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 202 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Ana María Miranda Mora,Yale Postdoctoral Fellow and Research Associate, Dresden University of Technology
Event description: 

Ana María Miranda Mora, Yale Postdoctoral Fellow and Research Associate, Dresden University of Technology, on “Gendering Democratic Theory from an Intersectional Perspective”

Lunch @ 12:30 pm ET, Talk @ 1:00 pm
Location: Luce Hall, Rm 202, 2nd fl, 34 Hillhouse Ave.
Part of the European & Russian Studies Community Lunch Seminar Series

In this talk, I delve into feminist approaches to democracy against the background of a genealogical and normative analysis within the framework of liberal European democracy. This work is part of my current research within the Horizon Europe EU-funded research project Push*Back*Lash: Anti-gender Backlash and Democratic Pushback.

BIO: Ana María Miranda Mora is a Fulbright postdoctoral fellow at the Council on Latin American & Iberian Studies (CLAIS) at Yale University and an Assistant Professor at the Chair of Political Theory and History of Ideas at Technical University Dresden in Germany. She received her Ph.D. in philosophy from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) (2021). In 2022, Ana was a DAAD postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Interdisciplinary Gender Studies at the University of Innsbruck in Austria. Her research and teaching focus on political and social philosophy, gender and feminist theory, and German philosophy (esp. Hegel, Marx, Engels, and Benjamin).

Open To: 

Can Shared Norms of Good Citizenship Reduce Native-Immigrant Conflict? Experimental Evidence from Greece- Nicholas Sambanis

Event time: 
Thursday, February 15, 2024 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Rosenkranz Hall RKZ, 241 See map
115 Prospect Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Nicholas Sambanis joins Yale as the Kalsi Family Professor of Political Science. He previously taught at Penn (2016-2023) and Yale (2001-2016), and he worked at the World Bank Development Economics Research Group (1999-2001). Sambanis is an expert on civil wars, ethnic conflict, and the politics of migration. His writing combines theories and methods from the fields of international relations, comparative politics, and political psychology to study processes of identity formation and change and the ways that identity politics shape conflict outcomes. He is the founder and faculty director of the Identity & Conflict Lab (ICL@Yale), a research group that studies both violent and non-violent inter-group conflict. His current writing is on how social identities shape individual behavior, how conflict affects identities, and on which interventions can help reduce intergroup conflict in its various guises, with particular focus on native-immigrant conflict.

Admission: 
Free

Translating André Bazin’s Film Criticism

Event time: 
Thursday, February 8, 2024 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Humanities Quadrangle HQ, 136 See map
320 York Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

How do translators bring to English-language readers of the 21st c. André Bazin’s classical style, extended metaphors, and ineffable elan? In the midst of translating 120 of his 2700 pieces— magisterial essays on cinema as well as reviews of forgotten movies—should “fidelity to the letter or to the spirit” be emphasized, as he asked about adaptation? Debating a few challenging instances, while looking at other extant translations, this roundtable will scrutinize translation as it converges with the mode of the essay and the genius of Bazin’s writing

With Dudley Andrew, Deborah Glassman, Nataša Ďurovičová
André Bazin on Adaptation: Cinema’s Literary Imagination (UCalif. Press, 2022)
André Bazin on Exploration and Documentary Cinema (UCalif. Press, in progress)

Moderated by Tadas Bugnevicius (Columbia Univ.)

Reception to Follow.

Admission: 
Free

Showing secret words: the representation of sacramental confession in Orthodox Russia and Ukraine

Event time: 
Friday, March 1, 2024 - 12:30pm to 2:30pm
Location: 
Humanities Quadrangle HQ, 136 See map
320 York Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Nadieszda Kizenko, Professor of History, University of Albany; Yale ISM Fellow
Event description: 

The Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies Program presents Nadieszda Kizenko, Professor of History, University of Albany; Yale ISM Fellow, on “Showing secret words: the representation of sacramental confession in Orthodox Russia and Ukraine”

In its emphasis on the spoken word, the rite of sacramental confession seems to resist visual representation. In Orthodox Christian Russia and Ukraine as in the rest of Europe, confession tends to appear in literature more often than it does in images. But there are some exceptions. This lecture looks at how confession was depicted in frescoes of the Last Judgment, illustrations of the seven sacraments, and intercessory icons. Because confession in the Russian empire was a legal requirement as well as a religious one, it also examines the political context of its representations. Late imperial images of convicted criminals refusing confession gave way to even more critical representations after the revolutions of 1917—and re-emerged and changed after the fall of communism, in forms ranging from porcelain figurines to Maidan photographs to memes.

Lunch at 12:30pm ET, talk at 1:00pm ET
Location: HQ, Rm 136, 1st fl, 320 York St.
Part of the European & Russian Studies Community Lunch Seminar Series

BIO: Nadieszda Kizenko researches and teaches Russian history, with a focus on religion and culture. She explores the history of Orthodox Christianity, saints’ lives as a historical source, lived religion, political liturgy, women’s written confessions, and depictions of religion in film. Her first book, A Prodigal Saint: Father John of Kronstadt and the Russian People (Penn State University Press, 2000) examined the cult of a charismatic priest whose cult spanned the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. A Russian edition appeared as “Святой Нашего Времени: о. Иоанн Кронштадтский и русский народ» (Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie, 2006). Her history of confession in Russia spanning four centuries, Good for the Souls: A History of Confession in the Russian Empire, was published with Oxford University Press in 2021. She has now begun a new project exploring the intersection of women, devotional practice, and writing.

Prof. Kizenko’s courses and seminars cover Russian history, East European history, religion and film, and European history in general. Recent dissertations supervised by Prof. Kizenko include: “Science and Culture on the Soviet Screen: Russian and Member Republic Biographical Films during the Early Cold War, 1946-1953,” “Promiscuous Pioneers of Morality: The Code of Ethics of a Secret Service Functionary in Communist Poland as Set by Law and Practice, 1944—1989,” “Sacrifice in the Name of Sacred Duty: The Representation of the Decembrist Wives in Russian Culture, 1825-Present,” and “Striving for Salvation: Margaret Anna Cusack, Sainthood, Religious Foundations and Revolution in Ireland, 1830-1922.”

Admission: 
Free
Open To: 

Poynter - Terrell Jermaine Starr, Covering the Russian Invasion of Ukraine as a Black Correspondent

Event time: 
Friday, February 23, 2024 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 202 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Terrell Jermaine Starr, independent journalist and Black Diplomats Media Group
Event description: 

Terrell Jermaine Starr, independent journalist, on “Covering the Russian Invasion of Ukraine as a Black Correspondent”

Terrell will talk with Professor Shore about his work in Ukraine, being an independent journalist, his journey of becoming an expert on Ukraine and Eastern European politics and how he is perceived in the region as a Black American.

Lunch at 12:30pm ET, talk at 1:00pm ET
Location: Luce Hall, Rm 202, 2nd fl, 34 Hillhouse Ave.
Zoom: https://bit.ly/ERSLunch-Feb2324
Part of the European & Russian Studies Community Lunch Seminar Series

Co-Sponsored By the Poynter Fellowship in Journalism at Yale; the Russian, East European, & Eurasian Studies Program; and the European Studies Council at the Yale MacMillan Center

Bio: Terrell Jermaine Starr is an independent journalist widely known for his coverage of the ongoing Russian invasion of Ukraine. He’s the founder of the newly-formed Black Diplomats Media Group that includes Black Diplomats newsletter on Substack, Black Diplomats Official YouTube channel and Black Diplomats podcast that will resume broadcasting mid-February and is available on Apple iTunes and all major podcast platforms.

Terrell’s work centers the Black perspective in foreign policy news and doesn’t shy away from inserting his personal views into his reporting when he talks about Ukraine, Gaza or any other part of the world.

A former Fulbright grantee to Ukraine, Terrell is currently a nonresident senior fellow at the Center for International Policy. He also is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, having served in Georgia in 2003 to 2005. He has masters degrees in Journalism and Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies from the University of Illinois and a bachelor’s degree from Philander Smith College, a historically Black College in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Admission: 
Free
Open To: 

Memetic Politics: War and Peace “After Truth” | Arvydas Grisinas

Event time: 
Friday, February 16, 2024 - 12:30pm to 2:30pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 202 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Arvydas Grišinas, Fulbright Visiting Fellow at Yale
Event description: 

This talk encapsulates an ongoing book project about the changing ways we engage in politics when public truths cease to be factual, wars are fought digitally, and knowledge is governed by AI. The 21st century was expected by many to be a time of radical, post-historical enlightenment, marked by an increasing velocity of scientific and technological innovation, interconnection, and knowledge sharing. It is, however, also a time of consecutive crises, discursive sectarianism and an anachronistic, ahistorical, yet hyper-mediated Russia’s war in Ukraine, fought with no rational purpose, meaningful reason, or clear format.

It is therefore obvious that we find ourselves at a time of a shifting regime of truth. On one hand, Western political and epistemological hegemony is seceding to non-Western political cultures. On the other hand, digital culture empowers dis-enlightened forms of knowledge-making and communication, driven by a different logic than the one we are used to. The result of this “dimming” of the Enlightenment is an emergence of memetic politics: a non-linear, associative, and performative form of political culture, where affect and representation rather than empirical evidence and factual presence dictate the dynamics of political processes, knowledge, and truth-making.

Lunch at 12:30pm ET, talk at 1:00pm ET
Location: Luce Hall, Rm 202, 2nd fl, 34 Hillhouse Ave
Zoom: Register for the webinar link- https://bit.ly/ERSLunch-Feb1624
Part of the European & Russian Studies Community Lunch Seminar Series

Dr. Arvydas Grišinas is Fulbright Visiting Fellow at Yale University and Researcher at Kaunas University of Technology. He also held visiting scholar positions at Yale University, Uppsala University (Sweden) and Institute for Human Sciences (Austria). His work centers on post-Soviet political identity formation in Central and Eastern Europe. He received his Ph.D. in Politics and Government from the University of Kent (Great Britain) in 2015, having finished his undergraduate education in History and Anthropology at Vilnius University (Lithuania).

Dr. Grišinas is the author of a book titled Politics with a Human Face: Identity and Experience in Post-Soviet Europe (Routledge, 2018) that examines how identity formation, symbolism, historical narratives, political images, and other human factors shape politics in Lithuania, Russia, Ukraine, and the rest of the post-Soviet European region.

He is currently working on a second book, exploring the challenges that the current technological, political and intellectual developments present to the enlightened processes of truth and meaning-making in politics, war and culture. The book explores topics of symbolism, performative politics and practices of truth as the ground for the emerging new Intuitive Politics, as it unfolds in both Eastern Europe and the West.

Admission: 
Free
Open To: 

The Zelensky Effect | Olya Onuch

Event time: 
Friday, January 26, 2024 - 11:00am to 1:00pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Olya Onuch, Professor (Chair) in Comparative and Ukrainian Politics, the University of Manchester
Event description: 

The Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies Program presents Olya Onuch, Professor (Chair) in Comparative and Ukrainian Politics, the University of Manchester, on “The Zelensky Effect” (OUP/Hurst 2023/2022, co-authored with Henry Hale) her recent book publication.

Talk at 11:00 am ET, lunch follows
Location: Luce Hall, Rm 203, 2nd fl, 34 Hillhouse Ave.
Part of the European & Russian Studies Community Lunch Seminar Series

How was Ukraine able to stand up and defend its independence against Russia’s all-out invasion in 2022? One cannot understand these historic events without understanding Zelensky, the country and its people. What makes Zelensky most extraordinary in war is his very ordinariness as a Ukrainian, though he is “ordinary” in a way that not everyone could be, in part because of skills honed in a long career at the intersection of entertainment, media, and politics. The Zelensky Effect unpacks this paradox, exploring Ukraine’s national history to show how its now-iconic president reflects the hopes and frustrations of the country’s first ‘independence generation.’ Interweaving compelling episodes from Zelensky’s life and career with data analysis and an informative history of independence-era Ukraine, it documents how Zelensky reflects and amplifies what social scientists call Ukraine’s strong “civic” form of national identity. This is the inclusive sense of nationhood that led not only Zelensky but millions of Ukrainians to take huge personal risks to defeat the invading army. The book is structured around several critical junctures in Ukraine’s and Zelensky’s history, including Ukraine’s appearance as an independent state in 1991, the Orange Revolution of 2004–5, the Euromaidan mass mobilization of 2013–14, the war with Russia after its 2014 annexation of Crimea, Zelensky’s highly unusual 2019 election campaign, his presidency prior to 2022, and his rise to become the iconic wartime president he is today after Russia’s February 24, 2022, assault. A concluding chapter examines prospects for a postwar Ukraine. (more info: https://academic.oup.com/book/46150/chapter/404745373)

BIO: Prof. Olya Onuch (DPhil Oxon, 2011) is Professor (Chair) in Comparative and Ukrainian Politics at the University of Manchester (making Onuch the first-ever holder of a Full Professorship in ‘Ukrainian Politics’ in the English-speaking world).

Onuch joined UoM in 2014, after holding research posts at the University of Toronto (2010-2011), the University of Oxford (2011-2014), and Harvard University (2013-2014). Since 2014, in addition to her post at UoM, Prof. Onuch was: an Associate Member (Politics) of Nuffield College at the University of Oxford (2014-2021), a Fellow at the Davis Center at the University of Harvard (2017), a Visiting Professor at Universidad Di Tella (2019-2020), and a Senior Research Associate at CERES, Munk School at the University of Toronto (2021).

Onuch is the author of two books, as well as, numerous scholarly articles, book chapters, and policy briefs. Her first monograph, Mapping Mass Mobilization analyzed processes shaping mass protest in Argentina and Ukraine. Her second monograph, The Zelensky Effect (OUP/Hurst 2023/2022, co-authored with Henry Hale) has received extensive praise in New York Review of Books, TLS Foreign Affairs, Guardian, Washington Post, New York Times, The Diplomatic Courier, The Times Radio Podcast, The Telegraph, Ukraine Lately Podcast, The Democracy Paradox, Ukraiinska Pravda, Forbes Ukraine, Elle Ukraine and more. Based on 8 years of research Onuch and Hale analyze the rise of democratic duty and state attachment in Ukraine – showing that Presdient Zelensky is as much a product of the Ukrainian civic nation that he comes to embody as he is a proudfly capable leader who helps rally a key consitency in Ukraine. Thus, The Zelensky Effect is as much about how the Ukrainian nation made Zelensky the man he is today as it is about his personally capacity to rally key consituencies and unite them. He is simply one of 44 million just like him. (more info: https://olgaonuch.com/)

Admission: 
Free
Open To: 

Screening of Farewell Until the Next War | Complexities of Resistance: Partisan Films from Eastern Europe and the Balkans Film Series

Event time: 
Thursday, April 11, 2024 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Humanities Quadrangle HQ, L02 See map
320 York Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Complexities of Resistance: Partisan Films from Eastern Europe and the Balkans Film Series presents a film screening of FAREWELL UNTIL THE NEXT WAR (Nasvidenje v Naslednji Vojni)
SR Slovenia, 1980. 117 minutes. DCP. Slovenian Film Archive, Ljubljana.
Directed by Živojin Pavlović

on Thursday, March 30, 2024, 7:00 p.m.
Humanities Quadrangle, Screening Room L02
320 York Street, New Haven, CT 06511
Free and open to the public | All films will be shown with English subtitles

Continuing the demythologizing of the Yugoslav partisan struggle that he began three years earlier with Manhunt (shown in the fall segment of our series), with this stunningly shot work Pavlović created what is probably the most bitter and most controversial of all partisan films. Farewell Until the Next War filters its representation of conflict through the interwoven memories of a former German soldier and a former Yugoslav partisan who meet while on holiday in Spain.

Sponsors:
Edward J. and Dorothy Clarke Kempf Memorial Fund; Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies Program; European Studies Council; Whitney Humanities Center; Yale Film Archive; Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures; and Film and Media Studies Program

About the Film Series: In the aftermath of World War II, several European states started reconstructing and reimagining their identities and recent histories by producing a vast number of films that celebrated and commemorated their guerrilla struggles against fascism. These films ranged in scope and ambition from intimate psychological dramas to overblown military spectacles, from elegiac recollections to pure pulp fiction. Similar to Hollywood westerns, partisan films were the defining genre of the socialist film industry for a significant period. Moreover, in the late 60s and early 70s, both genres reinvented themselves and underwent a political revision that ended their respective “classical periods.” Despite being hugely successful in their domestic markets and often cinematically accomplished, many examples of the partisan films never traveled abroad, and most film prints today remain locked up and in dire need of preservation in various national film archives. Aside from a handful of canonical works, the majority of films we will screen have never been shown in the U.S.

Admission: 
Free
Open To: 
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