General Public

European & Russian Studies M.A. of Yale University Info Session

Event time: 
Thursday, December 2, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:15pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Join the European Studies Council of the MacMillan Center at Yale for an information session on the application process and opportunities within the European & Russian Studies M.A. program.
Register for the session: https://bit.ly/3HGeL58

Open To: 

35 Years of Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: The Legacy of Guillermo O’Donnell and Philippe Schmitter

Event time: 
Wednesday, December 8, 2021 - 12:00pm to 2:00pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Discussants:
1.Prof. Philippe Schmitter: Emeritus Professor of Political Science (EUI), Co-Author of the Book
2.Prof. Gabriela Ippolito-O’Donnell: Professor of Political Science (UNSAM)
3.Prof. Milan Svolik: Professor of Political Science (Yale University)
Moderator:
Martin Mejia: Visiting Doctoral Fellow CLAIS (Yale University/Tulane University)

Admission: 
Free
Zoom Webinar, register in advance

"Clepsydra and Other Poems" Book Discussion with Translator Adam Mahler

Event time: 
Friday, December 10, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Join the Council on Latin American & Iberian Studies and the Yale Translation Initiative to welcome alumnus Adam Mahler back to Yale for a discussion related to a forthcoming book - a new translation of the 1920 book of poems by Portuguese symbolist poet, Camilo Pessanha, who resided in Macau for the last part of his life (1894-1926). The session will feature a reading of a selection of the original poems in Portuguese with Adam’s new translations. Yale Professor David Jackson wrote the introduction for the book, “Camilo Pessanha in Macau (1894-1926): Symbolism, Orientalism, Exile, Modernity in Clepsydra,” and will provide welcome remarks.
Peter Cole, Horace W. Goldsmith Senior Lecturer in Judaic Studies and Senior Lecturer in Comparative Literature at Yale, will moderate the event.

Admission: 
Free
Via Zoom, register in advance

Conference on Reckoning with Empire: The Right to Self-Determination in Historical View

Event time: 
Friday, November 12, 2021 - 7:45am to Saturday, November 13, 2021 - 2:30pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

On November 12-13, Yale will host an international conference on decolonization. The conference celebrates a historic occasion—the 60 th anniversary of UN Resolution 1514, “Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples.” Not only was Resolution 1514 a key moment in terms of codifying the international right to self-determination. It also marked a turning point in the history of anticolonialism. While gathering for the conference, titled “Reckoning with Empire: The Right to Self-Determination in Historical View,” more than thirty international scholars will investigate the afterlives, precedents, and consequences of Resolution 1514.
Conference organizers, Professor Samuel Moyn, Henry R. Luce Professor of Jurisprudence at Yale Law School and Professor of History at Yale University, and Charlotte Kiechel, PhD candidate in History at Yale, noted how contemporary audiences, as well as historians, have yet to fully engage with the significance of Resolution 1514’s passage. “Resolution 1514 was a pivotal moment in the long struggle against empire, and it electrified the world, with many unsuspected consequences. Indeed, even today, its legacy is not exhausted,” Professor Moyn reflected.
Register to attend: https://resolution1514.yale.edu/conference-registration
For the Full program & schedule: https://resolution1514.yale.edu/program
On Friday, Nov 11th, at 10:30 AM, the keynote address will be delivered by Professor Adom Getachew. A political theorist, the Neubauer Family Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago, and a Yale alumnus, Professor Getachew works on the history of political thought, theories of race and empire, and postcolonial political theory. She is the author of Worldmaking after Empire: The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination from Princeton University Press (2019) and co-editor, with Jennifer Pitts, of the forthcoming W.E.B. Du Bois’s International Writings. The keynote address is titled “Africa for Africans: The History of Self-Determination before Decolonization.”
Generously sponsored by the European Studies Council at the MacMillan Center, and the Edward J. and Dorothy Clarke Kempf Memorial Fund

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
Open To: 

Between Turkish Nationalism and Greek Irredentism: The Greek Orthodox Community of Istanbul (ca. 1908-1923)

Event time: 
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Dimitris Kamouzis
Event description: 

Dimitris Kamouzis is a Researcher at the Centre for Asia Minor Studies (Athens, Greece). He received his PhD in History at the Department of Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies, King’s College London. He has written several articles on the Greek Orthodox populations of the Ottoman Empire/Turkey and is co-editor of the collective volume State – Nationalisms in the Ottoman Empire, Greece and Turkey: Orthodox and Muslims, 1830-1945 (Oxon: SOAS/ Routledge Studies on the Middle East, 2013). His research interests include Non-Muslim Minorities in the Ottoman Empire/Turkey, Greek-Turkish Relations, History of the Greek Diaspora, Oral History, Refugee Studies, and the History of Humanitarianism.
Sponsored by the Hellenic Studies Program at Yale University. The activities of the Hellenic Studies Program are generously funded by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Center for Hellenic Studies at Yale University.

203-432-0061

Event is Postponed: Rethinking Antisemitism for the 21st Century

Event time: 
Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 8:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Maurice Samuels, Director of the Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism
Event description: 

A Conversation with Professor Maurice Samuels

Admission: 
Free
To request the link please email: lynn.jackson-quinn@yale.edu

Open To: 

PRFDHR Seminar: Understanding the Causal Impact of Climate on Human Conflict, Professor Marshall Burke

Event time: 
Tuesday, October 26, 2021 - 2:30pm to 3:45pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Marshall Burke, Stanford University - Department of Earth System Science and Center on Food Security and the Environment
Event description: 

Scholars, writers, and policymakers from Shakespeare to Obama have noted linkages between the physical environment and human behavior toward one another. Professor Burke synthesizes a growing cottage industry of research that seeks to quantitatively measure how changes in climate can affect various types of human conflict. He re-analyzes dozens of individual studies using a common empirical framework and uses Bayesian techniques to study whether – and why – effect sizes differ across settings. Professor Burke finds robust linkages between increasing temperature and multiple types of human violence, including individual level violence (e.g. homicide), organized group violence (e.g. civil war), and self-harm. He then draws implications for a world that continues to warm.
Marshall Burke is associate professor in the Department of Earth System Science and center fellow at the Center on Food Security and the Environment at Stanford University, and research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research focuses on social and economic impacts of environmental change, and on measuring and understanding economic livelihoods across the developing world. His work regularly appears in both economics and scientific journals, including recent publications in Nature, Science, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and The Lancet. He holds a PhD in agricultural and resource economics from UC Berkeley, and a BA in international relations from Stanford. He is also co-founder of AtlasAI, a start-up using satellites and machine learning to measure livelihoods.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

PRFDHR Seminar: Global Mobile Inventors, Dr. Dany Bahar

Event time: 
Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - 2:30pm to 3:45pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Dany Bahar, Brown University, Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs
Event description: 

Dr. Bahar will present a comprehensive study on the dynamics of knowledge production and diffusion linked to global mobile inventors (GMIs). Together with his co-authors, Dr Bahar finds that GMIs are essential team members of the first few patents in technology classes new to the country of residence as compared to patents filed at later stages. They interpret these results as tangible evidence of GMIs facilitating the technology-specific diffusion of knowledge across nations. However, they find no evidence that innovation quality is different for patents in technologies with a larger share of GMIs present as inventors in the first few patents.
Dr. Dany Bahar is an Associate Professor at Brown University, Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs and a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution’s Global Economy and Development program. An Israeli and Venezuelan economist, he is also affiliated to The Growth Lab at Harvard Center for International Development, CESifo Group Munich and IZA Institute of Labor Economics.
His research sits at the intersection of international economics and economic development. In particular, he focuses on the diffusion of technology and knowledge within and across borders, as well as topics related to structural transformation and productivity dynamics. Lately, his focus has been towards migrants and refugees as an asset in the process of economic development.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

PRFDHR Seminar: When does Migration Law Discriminate against Women?, Dr. Catherine Briddick

Event time: 
Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 2:30pm to 3:45pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Catherine Briddick, University of Oxford - Refugee Studies Centre, Department of International Development
Event description: 

It is possible to identify gendered disadvantage at almost every point in a migrant woman’s journey, physical and legal, from country of origin to country of destination, from admission to naturalization. Rules which explicitly distribute migration opportunities differently on the grounds of sex/gender, such as prohibitions on certain women’s emigration, may produce such disadvantage. Women may also, however, be disadvantaged by facially gender-neutral rules. Examples of indirectly disadvantageous provisions include those which classify certain forms of labor as either ‘low’ or ‘high skilled’, using this categorization to distribute migration opportunities differentially. Such rules may disproportionately affect the mostly female workers whose labor in certain fields is considered ‘low-skilled’ in comparison to that undertaken by their predominantly male, ‘skilled’ counterparts. Scholars have identified the diverse ways in which states’ immigration and nationality laws continue to involve gendered and racialized exclusion, subordination and violence. Migration control practices, including those concerned with deterrence, detention and deportation, have also been impugned on these bases. The presentation by Dr. Catherine Briddick draws on this literature to examine whether rules that produce gendered disadvantage are open to challenge under the international legal regime charged with eradicating discrimination against women, the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). Particular attention will be paid to the protection CEDAW offers, or purports to offer, to women seeking international protection.
Catherine Briddick is the Martin James Departmental Lecturer in Gender and International Human Rights and Refugee Law at the Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Department of International Development at the University of Oxford, UK. She is also the Course Director for the MSc in Refugee and Forced Migration Studies at RSC and the Principal Investigator of Undoing Discriminatory Borders.
Dr. Briddick has over ten years’ experience researching, providing legal advice and engaging in legal advocacy on issues relating to gender, forced migration and human rights in the UK. She has practiced as a barrister, representing individuals before Courts and Tribunals in addition to having managed and delivered legal advice and information services in the not-for-profit sector.
She received her Master of Laws (Legum Magister) in Human Rights Law from the London School of Economics with Distinction. Her doctoral research, undertaken in the Faculty of Law at the University of Oxford, focused on migration status and violence against women to evaluate four selected ‘regimes of exception’. Her work has been published in journals including Social & Legal Studies and the Journal of Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Law. She has also contributed chapters in books like ‘Research Handbook on International Refugee Law’ and ‘The Oxford Handbook of International Refugee Law’, and written in several platforms including The Conversation and the RSC’s Rethinking Refuge.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

Notturno – Movie Screening, Talk and Q&A

Event time: 
Wednesday, October 6, 2021 - 6:30pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Elinda Labropoulou and Muthanna Khriesat - 2021 Maurice R. Greenberg World Fellows Ulla Kasten - Research Fellow at the Council on Middle East Studies at the Yale MacMillan Center
Event description: 

Movie screening available on demand from Saturday October 2nd until Tuesday October 5th, 2021 (inclusive) to be followed by Panel and Q&A session on Wednesday, October 6th, 2021.
Filmed over three years on the borders between Iraq, Kurdistan, Syria and Lebanon, Notturno captures the everyday life that lies behind the continuing tragedy of civil wars, ferocious dictatorships, foreign invasions and the murderous apocalypse of ISIS. Oscar® nominated and multiple award winner Gianfranco Rosi (SACRO GRA, FIRE AT SEA) constructs a sublime cinematic journey through the region finding peace and light within the chaos and despair in the aftermath of war. A mosaic of intimate moments and luminous images, Notturno is a profound and urgent cinematic achievement, from a master of the documentary form.
2021 World Fellows Elinda Labropoulou and Muthanna Khriesat will discuss the film and their experiences while working with refugees and youths in Greece, Northern Africa and the Middle East and will examine the similarities of victims of war in their struggle to survive. Moderated by Ulla Kasten, Archaeologist and Research Fellow at the Council on Middle East Studies and previous curator of the Yale Babylonian Collection.
Please submit your questions in advance to refugees@yale.edu or during the Q&A session on Wednesday, October 6th, 2021.
Panelists/Speakers:
•Elinda Labropoulou, Senior Journalist and Sustainable Entrepreneur; and 2021 World Fellow
•Muthanna Khriesat, Chief Operating Officer – Questscope; and 2021 World Fellow
Moderator:
•Ulla Kasten, Research Fellow at the Council on Middle East Studies at the Yale MacMillan Center

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
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