General Public

Postponed: Reading Ukraine: New Ukrainian Books Presentation Series with Marianna Kiyanovska & Marta Kuzma

Event time: 
Friday, November 18, 2022 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Location: 
Horchow Hall HRCH, 103 (GM Room) See map
55 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Marianna Kiyanovska, Award-winning Ukrainian writer, translator, literary scholar, and public figure
Event description: 

This event is postponed when the author can resume her tour in the US again.
The European Studies Council at the Yale MacMillan Center presents Reading Ukraine: New Ukrainian Books Presentation Series.
In Conversation with Marianna Kiyanovska, Award-winning Ukrainian writer, translator, literary scholar, public figure, and Marta Kuzma, Professor of Art, Yale University on ‘The Voices of Babyn Yar’
In person: Horchow Hall, GM Room, 55 Hillhouse Ave.
Virtual Registration/Zoom Link: https://bit.ly/YaleUkraineBooks11-18
Co-Sponsored by: International Security Studies | Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies Program | Ukrainian House | Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures | Yale Translation Initiative
With this collection of stirring poems the award-winning Ukrainian poet honors the victims of the Holocaust by writing their stories of horror, death, and survival in their own imagined voices. Artful and carefully intoned, the poems convey the experiences of ordinary civilians going through unbearable events leading to the massacre at Kyiv’s Babyn Yar from a first-person perspective to an effect that is simultaneously immersive and estranging. While conceived as a tribute to the fallen, the book raises difficult questions about memory, responsibility, and commemoration of those who had witnessed an evil that verges on the unspeakable. Translated by Oksana Maksymchuk and Max Rosochinsky
Bio: Marianna Kiyanovska, Award-winning Ukrainian writer, translator, literary scholar, and public figure whose works have been translated into eighteen languages. She is the author of more than a dozen books of poetry, prose, and literary translation. A winner of the Vilenica International Literary Festival and the CEI Fellowship (2007), she was also awarded the Gloria Artis Medal for Merit to Culture in Poland (2013). In 2020, she was recognized with the prestigious Taras Shevchenko Prize for The Voices of Babyn Yar.

Admission: 
Free
Open To: 

Reading Ukraine: New Ukrainian Books Presentation Series- Stanislav Aseyev & Timothy Snyder

Event time: 
Wednesday, November 2, 2022 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 202 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Stanislav Aseyev, Donetsk-born Ukrainian writer and journalist
Event description: 

The European Studies Council at the Yale MacMillan Center presents Reading Ukraine: New Ukrainian Books Presentation Series.
In Conversation with Stanislav Aseyev, author, and Professor Timothy Snyder on ‘The Torture Camp on Paradise Street’
In person: Luce Hall, Room 202, 34 Hillhouse Ave.
Virtual Registration/Zoom Link: https://bit.ly/YaleUkraineBooks11-02
Co-Sponsored by: International Security Studies | Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies Program | Ukrainian House | Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures | Yale Translation Initiative
In ‘The Torture Camp on Paradise Street,’ Ukrainian journalist and writer Stanislav Aseyev details his experience as a prisoner from 2015 to 2017 in a modern-day concentration camp overseen by the Federal Security Bureau of the Russian Federation (FSB) in the Russian-controlled city of Donetsk. This memoir recounts an endless ordeal of psychological and physical abuse, including torture and rape, inflicted upon the author and his fellow inmates over the course of nearly three years of illegal incarceration spent largely in the prison called Izoliatsiia (Isolation). Aseyev also reflects on how a human can survive such atrocities and reenter the world to share his story.

Since February 2022, numerous cases of illegal detainment and extreme mistreatment have been reported in the Ukrainian towns and villages occupied by Russian forces during the full-scale invasion. These and other war crimes committed by Russian troops speak to the genocidal nature of Russia’s war on Ukraine and reveal the horrors wreaked upon Ukrainians forced to live in Russian-occupied zones. It is important to remember, however, that the torture and killing of Ukrainians by Russian security and military forces began long before 2022. Rendered deftly into English, Aseyev’s compelling account offers a critical insight into the operations of Russian forces in the occupied territories of Ukraine.
Bio: Stanislav Aseyev is a Donetsk-born Ukrainian writer and journalist. In addition to two books recounting his experience under Russian occupation in eastern Ukraine, he is the author of a collection of poetry, a play, and a novel. Under the pen name Stanislav Vasin, he published short reports in the Ukrainian press on the outbreak of Russian-sponsored military hostilities in Donbas. Arrested and unlawfully imprisoned by separatist militia forces for “extremism” and “spying,” Aseyev was held captive and subjected to intermittent torture. In 2021, he was awarded the prestigious Taras Shevchenko National Prize for In Isolation.

Admission: 
Free
Open To: 

Reading Ukraine: New Ukrainian Books Presentation Series- Volodymyr Rafeyenko & Marci Shore

Event time: 
Friday, October 28, 2022 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Horchow Hall HRCH, 103 (GM Room) See map
55 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Volodymyr Rafeyenko, award-winning Ukrainian writer, poet, translator, literary and film critic
Event description: 

The European Studies Council at the Yale MacMillan Center presents Reading Ukraine: New Ukrainian Books Presentation Series.
In Conversation with Volodymyr Rafeyenko, author, and Professor Marci Shore on ‘Mondegreen: Songs about Death and Love’
In person: Horchow Hall, GM Room, 55 Hillhouse Ave.
Virtual Registration/Zoom Link: https://bit.ly/YaleUkraineBooks10-28
Co-Sponsored by: International Security Studies | Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies Program | Ukrainian House | Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures | Yale Translation Initiative
A mondegreen is something that is heard improperly by someone who then clings to that misinterpretation as fact. Fittingly, Volodymyr Rafeyenko’s novel ‘Mondegreen: Songs about Death and Love’ explores the ways that memory and language construct our identity, and how we hold on to it no matter what. The novel tells the story of Haba Habinsky, a refugee from Ukraine’s Donbas region, who has escaped to the capital city of Kyiv at the onset of the Ukrainian-Russian war. His physical dislocation—and his subsequent willful adoption of the Ukrainian language—place the protagonist in a state of disorientation during which he is forced to challenge his convictions. Written in a beautiful, experimental style, the novel shows how people—and cities—are capable of radical transformation and how this, in turn, affects their interpersonal relations and cultural identification. Taking on crucial topics stirred by Russian aggression that began in 2014, the novel stands out for the innovative and probing manner in which it dissects them, while providing a fresh Donbas perspective on Ukrainian identity. Translated and introduced by Mark Andryczyk
Bio: Volodymyr Rafeyenko, award-winning Ukrainian writer, poet, translator, literary and film critic. Having graduated from the Donetsk University with a degree in Russian philology and culture studies, he wrote and published entirely in Russian. Following the outbreak of the Russian aggression in Ukraine’s east, Rafeyenko left Donetsk and moved to a town near Kyiv where he wrote Mondegreen: Songs about Death and Love, his first novel in the Ukrainian language, which was shortlisted for the Taras Shevchenko National Prize, Ukraine’s highest award in arts and culture. Among other recognitions, he is the winner of the Volodymyr Korolenko Prize for the novel Brief Farewell Book (1999) and the Visegrad Eastern Partnership Literary Award for the novel The Length of Days (2017).

Open To: 

Extreme Rituals as Social Technologies

Event time: 
Friday, October 28, 2022 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Rosenkranz Hall RKZ, 202 See map
115 Prospect Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Dimitris Xygalatas
Department of Anthropology and Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Connecticut
Around the world, people engage in ritual activities that involve obvious expenditures of effort, energy and resources without equally obvious payoffs. Anthropologists have long proposed that such costly behaviors persist because they convey certain benefits to their practitioners and their communities. But how can we study these ostensible benefits, given the contextually sensitive nature of such cultural practices? This talk will present an interdisciplinary research program that combines laboratory and field methods to explore the puzzle of extreme rituals in real-life settings, specifically focusing on recent empirical evidence on the signaling functions of extreme ritual practices.

203-432-0061

A Jewish Poetics of Exile: Benjamin Fondane and Jewish Émigré Authors in Occupied France

Event time: 
Wednesday, November 2, 2022 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Online See map
Speaker/Performer: 
Julia Elsky, Associate Professor of French, Loyola University Chicago
Event description: 

The Benjamin (Yale 1962) and Barbara Zucker Lecture Series
Among the Jewish writers who emigrated from Eastern Europe to France in the 1910s and 1920s, a number chose to switch from writing in their languages of origin to writing primarily in French, a language that represented both a literary center and the promises of French universalism. Under the Nazi occupation of France, these Jewish émigré authors continued to write in their adopted language, reexamining both their Jewishness and their place as authors in France, even as the Vichy regime and Nazi occupiers denied their French identity through antisemitic and xenophobic laws. This talk pays particular attention to Benjamin Fondane’s rewriting of his poetry during the war.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

Open To: 

The Far Right in Greece and the Law

Event time: 
Wednesday, October 12, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
Rosenkranz Hall RKZ, 202 See map
115 Prospect Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Natalie Alikiviadou
Event description: 

Natalie Alkiviadou is Senior Research Fellow at Danish think-tank Justitia. Her research focuses on free speech, ‘hate speech’ and the far-right with 2 Routledge monographs and a range of peer-reviewed articles on the themes.
This book critically evaluates the rise of the far-right in Greece, detailing the legal context in which to understand both the emergence of Golden Dawn, the far-right’s largest grouping, and the 2020 court decision, in which it was deemed to be a criminal organisation.
Golden Dawn was a political party which, for years, also functioned as a violent subculture movement, with limited to no interference by the state. This book sets out the background to its rise in Greece, tracing its development from the post-Junta era. At the same time, the book provides an assessment of the legal framework within which the far-right has operated, and the legal tools available to tackle it – including criminal law, non-discrimination law, the laws governing political parties and the public order framework, and the country’s international and European obligations. Golden Dawn functioned as both a political party and violent entity until its leadership and parliamentary members were found guilty of leading and participating in a criminal organisation. This book demonstrates that the state of impunity in which Golden Dawn’s violent hit squads functioned was both a facilitating factor for its rise, and potentially for its demise, as the group potentially felt untouchable. And its attention to how Greek Law has tackled, and failed to tackle, Golden Dawn offers a timely and more generally useful assessment of how legislation, courts and policies can best challenge the far-right.
This book will be of interest to those teaching and studying in law and politics, as well as more others, concerned with the rise of the far right and violent organizations, especially in Europe.

203-432-0061

Study Room Open House: The Idea of Italy

Event time: 
Friday, September 30, 2022 - 1:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Yale Center for British Art YCBA, Study Room See map
1080 Chapel Street
New Haven, CT 06510
Event description: 

A display of photographs, drawings, and watercolors will be on view in the YCBA Study Room, in conjunction with the 4 pm book discussion on “The Idea of Italy: Photography and the British Imagination.”
The book examines how the new medium of photography influenced the British experience, appreciation, and perception of Italy in the nineteenth century.
The associated display, drawn from the museum’s rich collection of more than five hundred works on paper depicting Italy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, brings together watercolors and drawings executed by artists on the Grand Tour alongside early nineteenth-century photographs of Italy. Together the works demonstrate the influence of photography on traditions of Grand Tour image making.

Admission: 
Free

203-432-2800
Open To: 

Henry L. Stimson Lectures on World Affairs: Why Storytelling Works: Narrative as Method

Event time: 
Friday, September 30, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, Front Lawn See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Mary Sarotte
Event description: 

Mary Elise Sarotte is the inaugural holder of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Distinguished Professorship of Historical Studies at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). Sarotte earned her AB in History and Science at Harvard and her PhD in History at Yale University. She is the author or editor of six books, including most recently ‘Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate’, along with ‘The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall’ and ‘1989: The Struggle to Create Post-Cold War Europe’, both of which were selected as Financial Times Books of the Year, among other distinctions and awards. Following graduate school, Sarotte served as a White House Fellow, then joined the faculty of the University of Cambridge, where she received tenure before accepting an offer to return to the United States and teach at the University of Southern California. Sarotte is a former Humboldt Scholar, a former member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, an associate at Harvard University’s Center for European Studies, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.
Dr. Sarotte will deliver three lectures this year related to her book ‘Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate’.
The Stimson Lecture Series is held in honor of Henry L. Stimson, Yale College 1889, an attorney and statesman whose government service culminated with his tenure as secretary of war during World War II. Since 1998, the MacMillan Center and the Yale University Press have collaborated to bring distinguished diplomats and foreign policy experts to the Center to lecture on their books that are published by the Yale Press.

203-432-0061

Henry L. Stimson Lectures on World Affairs: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate

Event time: 
Thursday, September 29, 2022 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 101 (Auditorium) See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Mary Sarotte
Event description: 

Mary Elise Sarotte is the inaugural holder of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Distinguished Professorship of Historical Studies at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). Sarotte earned her AB in History and Science at Harvard and her PhD in History at Yale University. She is the author or editor of six books, including most recently ‘Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate’, along with ‘The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall’ and ‘1989: The Struggle to Create Post-Cold War Europe’, both of which were selected as Financial Times Books of the Year, among other distinctions and awards. Following graduate school, Sarotte served as a White House Fellow, then joined the faculty of the University of Cambridge, where she received tenure before accepting an offer to return to the United States and teach at the University of Southern California. Sarotte is a former Humboldt Scholar, a former member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, an associate at Harvard University’s Center for European Studies, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.
Dr. Sarotte will deliver three lectures this year related to her book ‘Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate’. This event will be followed by a small reception.
The Stimson Lecture Series is held in honor of Henry L. Stimson, Yale College 1889, an attorney and statesman whose government service culminated with his tenure as secretary of war during World War II. Since 1998, the MacMillan Center and the Yale University Press have collaborated to bring distinguished diplomats and foreign policy experts to the Center to lecture on their books that are published by the Yale Press.

203-432-0061

Henry L. Stimson Lectures on World Affairs: From How to Why: The Post-Cold War Punctuational Moment and Its Legacy

Event time: 
Wednesday, September 28, 2022 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 101 (Auditorium) See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Mary Sarotte
Event description: 

Mary Elise Sarotte is the inaugural holder of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Distinguished Professorship of Historical Studies at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). Sarotte earned her AB in History and Science at Harvard and her PhD in History at Yale University. She is the author or editor of six books, including most recently ‘Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate’, along with ‘The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall’ and ‘1989: The Struggle to Create Post-Cold War Europe’, both of which were selected as Financial Times Books of the Year, among other distinctions and awards. Following graduate school, Sarotte served as a White House Fellow, then joined the faculty of the University of Cambridge, where she received tenure before accepting an offer to return to the United States and teach at the University of Southern California. Sarotte is a former Humboldt Scholar, a former member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, an associate at Harvard University’s Center for European Studies, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.
Dr. Sarotte will deliver three lectures this year related to her book ‘Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate’.
The Stimson Lecture Series is held in honor of Henry L. Stimson, Yale College 1889, an attorney and statesman whose government service culminated with his tenure as secretary of war during World War II. Since 1998, the MacMillan Center and the Yale University Press have collaborated to bring distinguished diplomats and foreign policy experts to the Center to lecture on their books that are published by the Yale Press.

203-432-0061
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