General Public

Russian Émigrés and their Impact in Interwar Greece

Event time: 
Friday, February 25, 2022 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

The victory of the Bolshevik Red Army over its opponents forced thousands of Russians to abandon their homes and pursue their lives in exile. Embarking on a long period of transit, former subjects of the Russian Empire spread across the five continents and established diasporic communities, known as Russia Abroad. This presentation will focus on one of the stops on their journey ––Greece––and will attempt to reconstruct the experiences of Russian émigrés in a country afflicted by its own refugee crisis.
Charis Marantzidou is a PhD student in modern European history and a Richard Hofstadter Fellow at Columbia University. Her research focuses on modern Russia and the Soviet Union with a particular interest in the communities of Russian diaspora in Europe.
Before coming to Columbia, Charis completed a master’s in International History at the London School of Economics. She holds a B.A. in Liberal Arts from Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, NY.
HYBRID EVENT
Due to campus COVID restrictions only Yale ID holders will be permitted to attend in person.
REGISTER TO JOIN ONLINE https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_vtkdt0YhQV2AcV7tDAV0og

203-432-0061

Constantinopolitans and the View from the City: on Greek Diaspora, National Homeland, and Cosmopolitan Identity

Event time: 
Wednesday, February 16, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

The Evolution of a Nation
In light of the anniversaries of the 1821 Greek revolution and the end of the Greco-Turkish war in 1922 the Hellenic Studies Program proposes a lecture series focused on the historic demographic shifts which have shaped the current state of the Greek nation. The series addresses the manner in which the introduction of Greek communities from the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea into the Greek polity expand and complicate our understanding of the evolution of the Greek nation. In doing so, the lectures contest and disturb the linear narrative of a pre-existing nation unfolding wings to its present diverse forms from the mythical origin of a Peloponnesian heartland.
Foremost among the critical language we employ to address the diffusion of the Greek nation is the term “repatriation” (επαναπατρισμός), which fails to account for the geographical origins of the alleged repatriated communities into the Helladic domain of the Greek state. For the communities in question (Asia Minor, Black Sea, and Egypt) the Greek mainland was never their homeland and their mostly forced transplantation to Greece was a form of exile. As these communities took root in the urban centers of Greece, they also developed strategies and institutions explicitly aimed at preserving traditions that testify to the rich diversity of Hellenic identities and their adoption of and contribution to the wider cultural canvas of their lost and new homelands.
The series, titled “The Evolution of a Nation,” will also extend to more recent demographic shifts since the early 1990s by a parallel but related discussion of the ways and tactics by which second generation Greeks from immigrant communities balance the dynamic and constructive tension between assimilation and a potentially hyphenated Greekness that also acknowledges and fosters their families’ ethnic origins.
Ilay Romain Ors is an Associate Professor in Social Anthropology based in Athens, Greece. She earned her BA degrees in Sociology and Political Science & International Relations at Bogazici University Istanbul, studied at the MSc program in Social Anthropology at the University College London, and received her PhD in Anthropology and Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard University. Her dissertation project on the Rum Polites, the Constantinopolitan Greek Orthodox community, was revised and published as Diaspora of the City: stories of cosmopolitanism from Istanbul and Athens (Palgrave 2018). Her other research interests, teaching, and publications center on urban studies, social movements, minority identity, migration, multiculturalism, food, sports, and everyday life in Greece and Turkey. Currently, she is engaged in a multi-sited project on overlapping migratory waves in the Aegean based on research in Athens, Lesvos, and Leros, which is funded by the Independent Social Research Foundation. Ors is an Associate Lecturer at the American College of Greece, Deree College, and holds a Research Affiliate position with the University of Oxford.

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PRFDHR Seminar: What is Home? Stories of Belonging from the New Syrian Diaspora, Professor Wendy Pearlman

Event time: 
Tuesday, February 1, 2022 - 2:30pm to 3:45pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Wendy Pearlman, Northwestern University - Political Science Department
Event description: 

What is home? While of universal significance, this question gains special meaning in contexts of forced migration, as the violent dislodging of persons from their established moorings brings to the fore dynamics of home-making that are obscured in more settled circumstances. Syria is a particularly illustrative case due to the staggering speed and scope of the displacement of millions of people, as well as the unparalleled variety of experiences that they are having in nearly every country across the globe. This presentation will introduce Professor Wendy Pearlman current book project, which explores experiences of losing home, searching for home, finding home, or not finding home based on 475 original interviews that she has conducted since 2012 with Syrian refugees, migrants, and asylum-seekers, now residing on five continents. Professor Pearlman argues that Syrians’ life stories reveal how home is the convergence of many elements, including security, fulfillment, place, love, and belonging. When these elements do not straightforwardly merge in a single home, people must bring home into being however they can. They might create elements anew, make do with some elements but not others, or come to a new understanding of what matters to them most. Doing so requires perseverance through adversity in order to grow an awareness of whom one really is and what gives one a sense of being anchored in the world. For those who do not have the privilege of taking home for granted, therefore, home is an achievement. Seeing home in this light exposes the hollowness of discourse that either accuses migrants and refugees of living easy on social benefits or that tokenizes the successes of migrant doctors, entrepreneurs, or star pupils who defy the odds to earn social accolades. Instead, it considers how simply arriving at the point where one feels at home is itself a feat worthy of recognition. To be cast out into the world and search for home anew is an act of courage. To find home is a gift worth celebrating. To persevere without it is a reflection of strength worthy of recognition and respect.
Wendy Pearlman is Professor of Political Science at Northwestern University, where she holds the Charles Deering McCormick Professorship of Teaching Excellence and specializes in Middle East politics. Her research has focused on comparative politics, social movements, political violence, refugees and migration, emotions and mobilization, and the Arab-Israeli conflict. She is the author of four books: Occupied Voices: Stories of Everyday Life from the Second Intifada (Nation Books, 2003), Violence, Nonviolence, and the Palestinian National Movement (Cambridge University Press, 2011), and Triadic Coercion: Israel’s Targeting of States that Host Nonstate Actors (with Boaz Atzili, Columbia University Press, 2018) and We Crossed a Bridge and It Trembled: Voices from Syria (HarperCollins, 2017). Her new book about Syrian narratives of homes is under contract with Liveright.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

Art, Education, and Protest in Hungary: The Radical Vision of FreeSZFE

Event time: 
Thursday, January 27, 2022 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Zoom webinar registration: https://bit.ly/34gVoQO
In an unprecedented move during the summer of 2020, students and faculty of the University of Theatre and Film of Budapest stood up against the nationalist-populist government’s measure to take full control of the country’s most prestigious art school. First, the institution’s full leadership resigned, and then, in a spectacular protest event, students occupied the iconic downtown building of the university. In the following months, a newly formed self-governing student body organized the most powerful and creative protest movement to this day against Viktor Orbán’s autocratic regime. Meanwhile, the resigned faculty laid the foundations of a new independent organization, the FreeSzFE Society, which has evolved into a vibrant artistic community. Today it offers year-long courses and workshops, produces films and performances, and grants their students diplomas through a network of European universities—all with the support of a wide audience of art-lovers and fans committed to democracy and the autonomy of higher education.
Panelists:
Ildikó Enyedi, Film Director and University Professor
László Upor, Dramaturg, Translator, and University Professor (SzFE Society)
Aujeszky Nóra Ilona, Legal Officer, HCLU, former SzFE Student (Television Production)
Moderator:
Anikó Szűcs, Lecturer, Yale University
Sponsored by Beinecke Library, the Postwar Culture Working Group, and the Whitney Humanities Center. For more information about the ART & PROTEST SERIES or to join the mailing list, write to kevin.repp@yale.edu.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
Open To: 

These are Still Situationist Times with Jacqueline de Jong

Event time: 
Thursday, December 16, 2021 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Zoom webinar registration: https://bit.ly/3xH1YLh
JACQUELINE DE JONG has been a strong and fiercely independent voice of resistance since the fiery debut of her Situationist Times in 1962. Joining us from her home in Amsterdam, Jacqueline will talk about the tense dynamics of art and protest in the 1960s, from the disputes with Debord that shaped first issue of The Situationist Times to her defiant posters for the Atelier Populaire during the Parisian uprisings of May 1968. From there she will turn to her latest work, including the long-delayed seventh number of the Situationist Times and her latest paintings, inspired by the immigration crisis in Europe, currently on display in the solo exhibition Border-Line at Ortuzar Projects in New York. We hope you will join us for this rare opportunity to reflect on the changing role of art in cultures of protest across two distinct historical eras.
Sponsored by Beinecke Library, the Postwar Culture Working Group, and the Whitney Humanities Center. For more information about the ART & PROTEST SERIES or to join the mailing list, write to kevin.repp@yale.edu.

Open To: 

European & Russian Studies M.A. of Yale University Info Session

Event time: 
Thursday, December 2, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:15pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Join the European Studies Council of the MacMillan Center at Yale for an information session on the application process and opportunities within the European & Russian Studies M.A. program.
Register for the session: https://bit.ly/3HGeL58

Open To: 

35 Years of Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: The Legacy of Guillermo O’Donnell and Philippe Schmitter

Event time: 
Wednesday, December 8, 2021 - 12:00pm to 2:00pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Discussants:
1.Prof. Philippe Schmitter: Emeritus Professor of Political Science (EUI), Co-Author of the Book
2.Prof. Gabriela Ippolito-O’Donnell: Professor of Political Science (UNSAM)
3.Prof. Milan Svolik: Professor of Political Science (Yale University)
Moderator:
Martin Mejia: Visiting Doctoral Fellow CLAIS (Yale University/Tulane University)

Admission: 
Free
Zoom Webinar, register in advance

"Clepsydra and Other Poems" Book Discussion with Translator Adam Mahler

Event time: 
Friday, December 10, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Join the Council on Latin American & Iberian Studies and the Yale Translation Initiative to welcome alumnus Adam Mahler back to Yale for a discussion related to a forthcoming book - a new translation of the 1920 book of poems by Portuguese symbolist poet, Camilo Pessanha, who resided in Macau for the last part of his life (1894-1926). The session will feature a reading of a selection of the original poems in Portuguese with Adam’s new translations. Yale Professor David Jackson wrote the introduction for the book, “Camilo Pessanha in Macau (1894-1926): Symbolism, Orientalism, Exile, Modernity in Clepsydra,” and will provide welcome remarks.
Peter Cole, Horace W. Goldsmith Senior Lecturer in Judaic Studies and Senior Lecturer in Comparative Literature at Yale, will moderate the event.

Admission: 
Free
Via Zoom, register in advance

Conference on Reckoning with Empire: The Right to Self-Determination in Historical View

Event time: 
Friday, November 12, 2021 - 7:45am to Saturday, November 13, 2021 - 2:30pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

On November 12-13, Yale will host an international conference on decolonization. The conference celebrates a historic occasion—the 60 th anniversary of UN Resolution 1514, “Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples.” Not only was Resolution 1514 a key moment in terms of codifying the international right to self-determination. It also marked a turning point in the history of anticolonialism. While gathering for the conference, titled “Reckoning with Empire: The Right to Self-Determination in Historical View,” more than thirty international scholars will investigate the afterlives, precedents, and consequences of Resolution 1514.
Conference organizers, Professor Samuel Moyn, Henry R. Luce Professor of Jurisprudence at Yale Law School and Professor of History at Yale University, and Charlotte Kiechel, PhD candidate in History at Yale, noted how contemporary audiences, as well as historians, have yet to fully engage with the significance of Resolution 1514’s passage. “Resolution 1514 was a pivotal moment in the long struggle against empire, and it electrified the world, with many unsuspected consequences. Indeed, even today, its legacy is not exhausted,” Professor Moyn reflected.
Register to attend: https://resolution1514.yale.edu/conference-registration
For the Full program & schedule: https://resolution1514.yale.edu/program
On Friday, Nov 11th, at 10:30 AM, the keynote address will be delivered by Professor Adom Getachew. A political theorist, the Neubauer Family Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago, and a Yale alumnus, Professor Getachew works on the history of political thought, theories of race and empire, and postcolonial political theory. She is the author of Worldmaking after Empire: The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination from Princeton University Press (2019) and co-editor, with Jennifer Pitts, of the forthcoming W.E.B. Du Bois’s International Writings. The keynote address is titled “Africa for Africans: The History of Self-Determination before Decolonization.”
Generously sponsored by the European Studies Council at the MacMillan Center, and the Edward J. and Dorothy Clarke Kempf Memorial Fund

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
Open To: 

Between Turkish Nationalism and Greek Irredentism: The Greek Orthodox Community of Istanbul (ca. 1908-1923)

Event time: 
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Dimitris Kamouzis
Event description: 

Dimitris Kamouzis is a Researcher at the Centre for Asia Minor Studies (Athens, Greece). He received his PhD in History at the Department of Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies, King’s College London. He has written several articles on the Greek Orthodox populations of the Ottoman Empire/Turkey and is co-editor of the collective volume State – Nationalisms in the Ottoman Empire, Greece and Turkey: Orthodox and Muslims, 1830-1945 (Oxon: SOAS/ Routledge Studies on the Middle East, 2013). His research interests include Non-Muslim Minorities in the Ottoman Empire/Turkey, Greek-Turkish Relations, History of the Greek Diaspora, Oral History, Refugee Studies, and the History of Humanitarianism.
Sponsored by the Hellenic Studies Program at Yale University. The activities of the Hellenic Studies Program are generously funded by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Center for Hellenic Studies at Yale University.

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