General Public

Great Power Competition and post-Brexit Britain

Event time: 
Friday, February 12, 2021 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

The European Studies Council will host a panel of experts on “Great Power Competition and post-Brexit Britain”
Featuring the following speakers:
Paul Kennedy, J. Richardson Dilworth Professor of History, Yale University
Shashank Joshi, Defense Editor of The Economist
Suzanne Raine, Lecturer, Cambridge University; formerly of the UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office and Head of the Joint Terrorism Assessment Centre
Hamish Falconer, member of Britain’s diplomatic service, European Studies Council Visiting Fellow (Spring 2021), Yale World Fellow 2020
Please register for the virtual event: http://bit.ly/GreatPower-PostBrexit
Suzanne Raine served in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office from 1995-2019, including postings in Poland, Iraq (2003) and Pakistan (2006-9). She worked primarily on national security issues and specialised in counter-terrorism, holding a number of senior domestic appointments including Head of the Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre from 2015-2017. She was also a senior member of the HMG’s assessment community and is particularly interested in the role of assessment in strategic decision making at a time of crisis.
Suzanne was born in Germany and educated at Peterhouse, Cambridge where she was awarded a double first in history, specialising in German history. She is now an affiliated lecturer at the Forum on Geopolitics, Cambridge University and member of the Board of Trustees of the Imperial War Museum and the Royal United Services Institute.
Shashank Joshi is The Economist‘s defence editor. Prior to joining The Economist in 2018, he served as Senior Research Fellow at the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) and Research Associate at Oxford University’s Changing Character of War Programme. He has published books on Iran’s nuclear programme and India’s armed forces, written for a wide range of newspapers and journals, and appeared regularly on radio and television. He holds degrees from Cambridge and Harvard, where he served as a Kennedy Scholar from Britain to the United States.
Paul M. Kennedy is the J. Richardson Dilworth Professor of History and Distinguished Fellow of the Brady-Johnson Program in Grand Strategy. He served as the director of ISS from 1989 until 2017, and he is now the director of the maritime and naval studies initiative.
A native of northern England, Professor Kennedy obtained his BA at Newcastle University and his D.Phil at the University of Oxford. He is a former Fellow of the Institute for Advanced Studies, Princeton University, and of the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung, Bonn. He holds many honorary degrees, and is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, the American Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was made Commander of the Order of the British Empire (C.B.E.) in 2000 for services to History and elected a Fellow of the British Academy in June 2003. He is the author or editor of nineteen books, including The Rise of the Anglo-German Antagonism, The War Plans of the Great Powers, The Realities Behind Diplomacy, and Preparing for the Twenty-First Century. His best-known work is The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers (Random House), which provoked an intense debate on its publication in 1988 and has been translated into over twenty languages. He is on the editorial board of numerous scholarly journals and writes for The New York Times, The Atlantic, and many foreign-language newspapers and magazines. His monthly column on current global issues is distributed worldwide by the Los Angeles Times Syndicate/Tribune Media Services.
His latest book, Engineers of Victory: The Problem Solvers who Turned the Tide in the Second World War, was published in 2013 by Random House. He is now working on a study of sea power in the same war, and recently completed a new foreword to his classic 1976 book, The Rise and Fall of British Naval Mastery.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
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After the Deportation: Memory Battles in Postwar France

Event time: 
Wednesday, March 10, 2021 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Philip G. Nord (Professor of History, Princeton University)
Event description: 

The Benjamin (Yale 1962) and Barbara Zucker Lecture Series
Philip G. Nord will engage in conversation with Carolyn Dean and Maurice Samuels about his new book, After the Deportation: Memory Battles in Postwar France.
An estimated 160,000 people, a mix of résistants and Jews, were deported from France to concentration camps in Central and Eastern Europe during the Second World War. In the decades following the Liberation, the French argued over how to remember the deportees, generating competing narratives about the Deportation experience–Communist, Gaullist, Jewish, and Catholic. This talk will analyze these narratives and how they were given form in literature, art, film, and monuments.

Admission: 
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Scientific Babel and Other Translating Machines

Event time: 
Friday, January 29, 2021 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Michael Gordin, the Rosengarten Professor of Modern and Contemporary History, Princeton University
Event description: 

The Translation Initiative and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies at Yale’s MacMillan Center are pleased to present an upcoming talk by Michael Gordin (History, Princeton University) on
“Scientific Babel and Other Translating Machines”
Michael Gordin is the Rosengarten Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at Princeton University, where he specializes in the history of modern science and Russian, European, and American history. He has co-edited several volumes and is the author of six monographs. Most of his work concentrates on the boundaries between science in the Slavic world and the West, the history of nuclear weapons, and the history of knowledge on the fringes of science. He is the author, most recently, of Einstein in Bohemia (Princeton, 2020), and Scientific Babel: How Science Was Done Before and After Global English (Chicago, 2015).
Professor Gordin will speak about his recent article, “The Forgetting and Rediscovery of Soviet Machine Translation,” Critical Inquiry 46.4 (Summer 2020), available here: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/pdf/10.1086/709226, as well as his 2015 book Scientific Babel: How Science Was Done Before and After Global English (University of Chicago Press) and more recent research—in conversation with Marijeta Bozovic (Slavic Languages and Literatures, Yale).
Register to Attend Virtual Event: http://bit.ly/Translation-SciBabel

Admission: 
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The Greek Fire. American-Ottoman Relations and Democratic Fervor in the Age of Revolutions

Event time: 
Wednesday, March 31, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Dr. Maureen Connors Santelli
Event description: 

Maureen Connors Santelli is an Associate Professor of History at Northern Virginia Community College.
Part of the The Greek Revolution Across the Globe, Lecture Series.

203-432-0061

Antisemitism and Fantasies of National Purity from Mussolini to the Present

Event time: 
Tuesday, February 23, 2021 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Ruth Ben-Ghiat, Professor of History and Italian Studies, New York University
Event description: 

The Benjamin (Yale 1962) and Barbara Zucker Lecture Series
This talk will examine the place of fantasies of national purity in selected authoritarian states from Mussolini to the present, and how racial legislation and propaganda, such as that directed at Jews, factors into this larger context. We will look at the three timeframes and states of mind strongman leaders leverage: utopia, nostalgia, and crisis.

Admission: 
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Identity, Agency, and the Constraints of Political Conditionality

Event time: 
Thursday, December 17, 2020 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Gintare Venzlauskaite, the Joseph P. Kazickas Visiting Fellow, Yale
Event description: 

The European Studies Council and the Baltic Studies Program at Yale present Dr. Gintare Venzlauskaite, the Joseph P. Kazickas Visiting Fellow, Yale, on “Identity, Agency, and the Constraints of Political Conditionality: Understanding Lithuanian Diasporas of Displacement Through Narratives of Return”

In her presentation Dr. Venzlauskaitė will discuss Lithuanian ethno-national domestic and diasporic communities characterized by mid-20th-century displacements and examine experiences, identity and memory through the lens of homecoming. Drawing from qualitative data collected in Lithuania, the Russian Federation, the United States, and Latvia, she highlights understudied aspects and manifestations of return, emphasizing the polyphony of perspectives, as well as the dynamics of forced migrants’ human agency and the structural-political domains that they were subjected to.
Register for Virtual Event: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_x0aJWuvvTAeGviRAM5QP3w
Gintare Venzlauskaite is the Joseph P. Kazickas Visiting Fellow at Yale for the Fall 2020 semester. Gintare Venzlauskaitė is an instructor at the University of Stirling (Scotland, UK), a Research Affiliate at the University of Glasgow, and a Junior Researcher at Kaunas University of Technology (Lithuania). Her research centers on Lithuanian twentieth-century diasporas and the complexities attendant to return and repatriation. She received her Ph.D. degree in Central and East European Studies from the University of Glasgow in 2019. Her doctoral dissertation, “From Post-War West to Post-Soviet East: Manifestations of Displacement, Collective Memory, and Lithuanian Diasporic Experience Revisited,” draws on qualitative data collected in five countries in which live Lithuanians affected by World War II-era migrations westward and Soviet deportations to the east. At Yale she will be working to turn her dissertation into a monograph. The book will discuss displaced persons and the resulting diasporas as both implicated and implicating Lithuanian grand narratives and national identity, while also eliciting the importance of plurality of memory and the multivocality of diasporic experience.

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Weapons of Mass Instruction in Putin's Russia: the Baltics in Educational Policies and Teaching History

Event time: 
Wednesday, December 9, 2020 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Dr. Solvita Denisa-Liepniece, the Juris Padegs Visiting Fellow, Yale
Event description: 

The European Studies Council and the Baltic Studies Program at Yale present Dr. Solvita Denisa-Liepniece, the Juris Padegs Visiting Fellow, on “Weapons of Mass Instruction in Putin’s Russia: the Baltics in Educational Policies and Teaching History.”
Register for Virtual Event: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_y2GdPkadTUCAsga5mtaNpQ
Solvita Denisa-Liepniece is the Juris Padegs Visiting Fellow at Yale for the Fall 2020 semester. Dr. Denisa-Liepniece is the Assistant Professor at Vidzeme University of Applied Sciences in Valmiera, Latvia. Her research interests are strategic political communication, intercultural communication, and information resilience. She completed her Ph.D. at the University of Antwerp in 2013 with a thesis on political communication in post-Soviet Belarus. Dr. Denisa-Liepniece serves as the country expert for several international organizations focused on media literacy and information resilience in the Baltic countries. At Yale she is studying the (re)construction of memory of Latvia and the Baltic states in Russia’s state-sponsored education discourse. She is co-author of several books on communication and media and published in 2019 a fairy tale for children on media literacy (also translated in Russian and Romanian). In addition to academic activities, Dr. Denisa-Liepniece has also had a career as a professional journalist and worked for Public Broadcasting of Latvia in the fields of both television and radio for more than fifteen years.

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European & Russian Studies M.A. Info Session

Event time: 
Tuesday, December 8, 2020 - 9:30am to 10:30am
Location: 
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Event description: 

Join the European Studies Council of the MacMillan Center at Yale for an information session on the application process and opportunities within the European & Russian Studies M.A. program.
Register for the session: https://bit.ly/ERSMAinfosess

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
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Women in White: A Feminist Revolution of a New Kind in Belarus?

Event time: 
Friday, December 4, 2020 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Women have been the center of the protest movement in Belarus against the rule of Alexander Lukashenko, including in the disputed elections of August 9, with the opposition led by Svetlana Tikhanovskaya. Women’s visions and voices for change and revolution in Belarus are the focus of this international panel.
Register for virtual event: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_jKuKbcNeSE-bgmmFJDAuWQ
Panel Participants:
Elena Gapova (Western Michigan University)
Olena Lennon (University of New Haven)
Julia Mickiewicz (Co-founder of the Feminist group within the Coordination Council, Belarus)
Maksimas Milta (European Humanities University)
Marylia Sliaptsova (Barys Zvozskau Belarusian Human Rights House)
Discussant: Aniko Szucs (Yale University)

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Enduring Utopia: Eastern Europe in Video Games

Event time: 
Thursday, December 3, 2020 - 3:30pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Daniil Leiderman, Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University
Event description: 

The first colloquium in the REEES Emerging Voices Virtual Colloquium series featuring Daniil Leiderman, Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University, on “Enduring Utopia: Eastern Europe in Video Games” The colloquium is hosted by Marijeta Bozovic, Assistant Professor of Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film and Media Studies; Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies, Yale University
Register for Virtual Event: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_XLhuAUW6RnW1esllzN90ig
BIO:
Daniil M. Leiderman teaches Art History and Games Studies at the Department of Visualization at Texas A&M University. In 2016, Daniil defended a PhD dissertation entitled: Moscow Conceptualism and “Shimmering”: Authority, Anarchism, and Space at the Department of Art & Archaeology in Princeton University. The project investigates the Moscow Conceptualists, a circle of experimental artists and writers that emerged in Moscow’s unofficial artistic scene in the early 1970s in the context of nonconformism, tracing their development of the critical strategy called “shimmering” and its relationship to contemporary Post-Soviet and Post-Crimean artistic resistance. Most recently, Daniil has been working on a book under contract with Amherst College Press, on the representation of utopian and dystopian projects through images of Eastern Europe in contemporary video games.

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