General Public

Event is Postponed: Rethinking Antisemitism for the 21st Century

Event time: 
Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 8:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Maurice Samuels, Director of the Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism
Event description: 

A Conversation with Professor Maurice Samuels

Admission: 
Free
To request the link please email: lynn.jackson-quinn@yale.edu

Open To: 

PRFDHR Seminar: Understanding the Causal Impact of Climate on Human Conflict, Professor Marshall Burke

Event time: 
Tuesday, October 26, 2021 - 2:30pm to 3:45pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Marshall Burke, Stanford University - Department of Earth System Science and Center on Food Security and the Environment
Event description: 

Scholars, writers, and policymakers from Shakespeare to Obama have noted linkages between the physical environment and human behavior toward one another. Professor Burke synthesizes a growing cottage industry of research that seeks to quantitatively measure how changes in climate can affect various types of human conflict. He re-analyzes dozens of individual studies using a common empirical framework and uses Bayesian techniques to study whether – and why – effect sizes differ across settings. Professor Burke finds robust linkages between increasing temperature and multiple types of human violence, including individual level violence (e.g. homicide), organized group violence (e.g. civil war), and self-harm. He then draws implications for a world that continues to warm.
Marshall Burke is associate professor in the Department of Earth System Science and center fellow at the Center on Food Security and the Environment at Stanford University, and research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research focuses on social and economic impacts of environmental change, and on measuring and understanding economic livelihoods across the developing world. His work regularly appears in both economics and scientific journals, including recent publications in Nature, Science, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and The Lancet. He holds a PhD in agricultural and resource economics from UC Berkeley, and a BA in international relations from Stanford. He is also co-founder of AtlasAI, a start-up using satellites and machine learning to measure livelihoods.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

PRFDHR Seminar: Global Mobile Inventors, Dr. Dany Bahar

Event time: 
Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - 2:30pm to 3:45pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Dany Bahar, Brown University, Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs
Event description: 

Dr. Bahar will present a comprehensive study on the dynamics of knowledge production and diffusion linked to global mobile inventors (GMIs). Together with his co-authors, Dr Bahar finds that GMIs are essential team members of the first few patents in technology classes new to the country of residence as compared to patents filed at later stages. They interpret these results as tangible evidence of GMIs facilitating the technology-specific diffusion of knowledge across nations. However, they find no evidence that innovation quality is different for patents in technologies with a larger share of GMIs present as inventors in the first few patents.
Dr. Dany Bahar is an Associate Professor at Brown University, Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs and a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution’s Global Economy and Development program. An Israeli and Venezuelan economist, he is also affiliated to The Growth Lab at Harvard Center for International Development, CESifo Group Munich and IZA Institute of Labor Economics.
His research sits at the intersection of international economics and economic development. In particular, he focuses on the diffusion of technology and knowledge within and across borders, as well as topics related to structural transformation and productivity dynamics. Lately, his focus has been towards migrants and refugees as an asset in the process of economic development.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

PRFDHR Seminar: When does Migration Law Discriminate against Women?, Dr. Catherine Briddick

Event time: 
Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 2:30pm to 3:45pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Catherine Briddick, University of Oxford - Refugee Studies Centre, Department of International Development
Event description: 

It is possible to identify gendered disadvantage at almost every point in a migrant woman’s journey, physical and legal, from country of origin to country of destination, from admission to naturalization. Rules which explicitly distribute migration opportunities differently on the grounds of sex/gender, such as prohibitions on certain women’s emigration, may produce such disadvantage. Women may also, however, be disadvantaged by facially gender-neutral rules. Examples of indirectly disadvantageous provisions include those which classify certain forms of labor as either ‘low’ or ‘high skilled’, using this categorization to distribute migration opportunities differentially. Such rules may disproportionately affect the mostly female workers whose labor in certain fields is considered ‘low-skilled’ in comparison to that undertaken by their predominantly male, ‘skilled’ counterparts. Scholars have identified the diverse ways in which states’ immigration and nationality laws continue to involve gendered and racialized exclusion, subordination and violence. Migration control practices, including those concerned with deterrence, detention and deportation, have also been impugned on these bases. The presentation by Dr. Catherine Briddick draws on this literature to examine whether rules that produce gendered disadvantage are open to challenge under the international legal regime charged with eradicating discrimination against women, the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). Particular attention will be paid to the protection CEDAW offers, or purports to offer, to women seeking international protection.
Catherine Briddick is the Martin James Departmental Lecturer in Gender and International Human Rights and Refugee Law at the Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Department of International Development at the University of Oxford, UK. She is also the Course Director for the MSc in Refugee and Forced Migration Studies at RSC and the Principal Investigator of Undoing Discriminatory Borders.
Dr. Briddick has over ten years’ experience researching, providing legal advice and engaging in legal advocacy on issues relating to gender, forced migration and human rights in the UK. She has practiced as a barrister, representing individuals before Courts and Tribunals in addition to having managed and delivered legal advice and information services in the not-for-profit sector.
She received her Master of Laws (Legum Magister) in Human Rights Law from the London School of Economics with Distinction. Her doctoral research, undertaken in the Faculty of Law at the University of Oxford, focused on migration status and violence against women to evaluate four selected ‘regimes of exception’. Her work has been published in journals including Social & Legal Studies and the Journal of Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Law. She has also contributed chapters in books like ‘Research Handbook on International Refugee Law’ and ‘The Oxford Handbook of International Refugee Law’, and written in several platforms including The Conversation and the RSC’s Rethinking Refuge.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

Notturno – Movie Screening, Talk and Q&A

Event time: 
Wednesday, October 6, 2021 - 6:30pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Elinda Labropoulou and Muthanna Khriesat - 2021 Maurice R. Greenberg World Fellows Ulla Kasten - Research Fellow at the Council on Middle East Studies at the Yale MacMillan Center
Event description: 

Movie screening available on demand from Saturday October 2nd until Tuesday October 5th, 2021 (inclusive) to be followed by Panel and Q&A session on Wednesday, October 6th, 2021.
Filmed over three years on the borders between Iraq, Kurdistan, Syria and Lebanon, Notturno captures the everyday life that lies behind the continuing tragedy of civil wars, ferocious dictatorships, foreign invasions and the murderous apocalypse of ISIS. Oscar® nominated and multiple award winner Gianfranco Rosi (SACRO GRA, FIRE AT SEA) constructs a sublime cinematic journey through the region finding peace and light within the chaos and despair in the aftermath of war. A mosaic of intimate moments and luminous images, Notturno is a profound and urgent cinematic achievement, from a master of the documentary form.
2021 World Fellows Elinda Labropoulou and Muthanna Khriesat will discuss the film and their experiences while working with refugees and youths in Greece, Northern Africa and the Middle East and will examine the similarities of victims of war in their struggle to survive. Moderated by Ulla Kasten, Archaeologist and Research Fellow at the Council on Middle East Studies and previous curator of the Yale Babylonian Collection.
Please submit your questions in advance to refugees@yale.edu or during the Q&A session on Wednesday, October 6th, 2021.
Panelists/Speakers:
•Elinda Labropoulou, Senior Journalist and Sustainable Entrepreneur; and 2021 World Fellow
•Muthanna Khriesat, Chief Operating Officer – Questscope; and 2021 World Fellow
Moderator:
•Ulla Kasten, Research Fellow at the Council on Middle East Studies at the Yale MacMillan Center

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

Kate Briggs: Windham-Campbell Prizes Virtual Festival

Event time: 
Wednesday, October 27, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

The seventh in a weekly series on Wednesdays at 12 noon ET featuring 2021 Windham-Campbell Prize Recipients in a 30-40 minute pre-recorded streaming video presentation featuring a live chat box, followed by a Zoom Q&A with that week’s featured writer. Future sessions include:
11/3 – Dionne Brand
11/10 – The Windham-Campbell Lecture by US Poet Laureate Joy Harjo.
Kate Briggs is a writer and translator whose brilliant first book This Little Art (2017) defies categorization. It is at once a memoir, a treatise, and a history, considering Briggs’s own life as a translator from French to English, offering an account of the nature and stakes of translation, and presenting a history of three women translators in the twentieth century. The book articulates and refracts the many strangenesses and paradoxes of translation as a practice and an art. Translation, Briggs shows us, is both lonely and collaborative, disciplined and profoundly educational, a private devotion and a public project. It energizes and frustrates, requiring from its practitioners passion, precision, and an openness to transformation. Briggs is the translator of two volumes of Roland Barthes’s lecture notes at the Collège de France, The Preparation for the Novel (2011) and How to Live Together: Novelistic Simulations of Some Everyday Spaces (2013), and co-translator of Michel Foucault’s Introduction to Kant’s Anthropology (2008). She teaches at the Piet Zwart Institute in Rotterdam, Netherlands and is currently working on a new book: a novel-essay titled The Long Form.
Visit windhamcampbell.org for more information about Kate and the other 2021 recipients!

Admission: 
Free
Open To: 

The Living Image: 50 Years of Photography and the Struggle for Social Justice in Italy

Event time: 
Thursday, May 20, 2021 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

An Art & Protest zoom webinar with Tano D’Amico
Registration: https://bit.ly/3vZ6na3
D’Amico is one of the world’s best-known photographers of social movements. Since his work for the radical Italian newspaper Lotta Continua in the 1970s, Tano has fought to counter the mainstream media’s image of social movements by capturing the beauty and passion of the struggle for social justice on the part of workers, feminists, gay rights activists, Roma and Sinti, the anti-globalization movement, and many other causes. In this special session of Art & Protest, Tano will lead us in a conversation about the power and agency of photography—as a tool of criminalization, exclusion, and repression on the part of authorities as well as an active, constitutive force capable of intervening directly in social reality to shape the identify of social movements and ensure their ultimate vindication in the struggle for history and memory. At stake is the irruption of a new image, a new kind of subversive beauty, carried forward by the voices, gestures, desires, and actions of a new set of actors entering on the historical stage.
Sponsored by Beinecke Library, the Postwar Culture Working Group, and the Whitney Humanities Center. For more information about the ART & PROTEST SERIES or to join the mailing list, write to kevin.repp@yale.edu

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
Open To: 

Mondays at Beinecke: Lucy Schwob and Suzanne Malherbe with Jeffrey H. Jackson

Event time: 
Monday, May 3, 2021 - 4:00pm to 4:30pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Jeffrey H. Jackson, is the author of “Paper Bullets: Two Artists Who Risked Their Lives to Defy the Nazis,” based on research in the Beinecke Library for the book.
Zoom webinar registration: https://bit.ly/31TtTs7
Jackson is the first to tell a little-known WWII story of an anti-Nazi campaign undertaken by two French women in his gripping book. Lucy Schwob and Suzanne Malherbe were gender norm-defying artists, better known by their artist names Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore, who used their art to courageously defy the Nazi occupation of their chosen home, the British Channel Island of Jersey. Over the course of four years, Schwob and Malherbe wrote and distributed anti-Hitler notes, insults and calls to desert – a tactic known as “Paper Bullets”- written under the disguise of a Nazi soldier called “The Soldier with No Name,” meant to sway other soldiers from believing in the Nazi rhetoric.
Schwob and Malherbe were braver for who they were: lesbian partners known for their provocative photography - Lucy was also half-Jewish and they had Communist ties. The pair were eventually betrayed by a neighbor in 1944 and sentenced to death for their actions; however even in jail, they continued to fight the Nazis by reaching out to other prisoners—including imprisoned German soldiers—to spread a message of hope. Jackson, a professor of History at Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, and an expert on European history and culture, vividly tells the hidden history of these two heroines, uncovering never before seen research and accurately describing the day-to-day life of civilians living in occupied territories and the tough decisions and sacrifices they constantly had to make to survive.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
Open To: 

The Asia Olympics: Past Achievements & Future Goals

Event time: 
Monday, April 19, 2021 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Susan E. Brownell
University of Missouri- St. Louis
William Kelly
Yale University
John Horne
Waseda UniversitY

203-432-0061

Britain and the EU after Brexit

Event time: 
Monday, April 19, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Speaker/Performer: 
Vernon Bogdanor, Professor of Government at the Institute of Contemporary British History, King’s College, London
Event description: 

Please register at http://bit.ly/BritainEUafterBrexit
VERNON BOGDANOR CBE is Professor of Government at the Institute of Contemporary British History, King’s College, London. He was formerly for many years Professor of Government at Oxford University. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, an Honorary Fellow of the Institute for Advanced Legal Studies, a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, and a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences. He has been an adviser to a number of governments, including those of Albania, Czech Republic, Hungary, Kosovo, Israel, Mauritius. Romania, Slovakia, Sweden and Trinidad. He has written numerous books, including Beyond Brexit: Towards a British Constitution, and Britain and Europe in a Troubled World.

Sponsored by the George Herbert Walker, Jr. Lecture Fund at Yale University, the European Studies Council, and Program in European Union Studies

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