Faculty

Documentary Screening: With Olive Groves in the Aegean: Greeks & Turks

Event time: 
Wednesday, November 30, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
Rosenkranz Hall RKZ, 202 See map
115 Prospect Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

In 1923 when Mustafa Kemal Atatürk rebuilt modern Turkey on the ashes of the Ottoman Empire, the Treaty of Lausanne ordered that all Muslims of Turkish decent who were living in Greece be exchanged with any Greek Christians living in Asia Minor. This population exchange of nearly two million people has left deep traces, many of which are still perceptible today. Fortunately one thing soothed the resulting pain and resentment: both Greeks and Turks had been growing olive trees since the olden days, providing a main source of survival and wealth. They lost their homes, but found new olive groves offering the livelihoods they needed.

203-432-0061

Borders, Migration, and Ethnicity in Historical Perspective: Greek Americans and Italian Americans in Context

Event time: 
Wednesday, November 16, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
Online See map
Event description: 

Theodora Patrona teaches literary courses at the School of English of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki as special teaching fellow. She has published extensively on Greek American and Italian American literature and film, and regularly reviews for journals and sites abroad. Dr Patrona is the author of Return Narratives: Ethnic Space in Late Twentieth Century Greek American and Italian American Literature(Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2017), and coeditor of Redirecting Ethnic Singularity: Italian Americans and Greek Americans in Conversation (Fordham University Press, 2022). Dr Patrona is currently working on two projects, co-editing a volume on the unchartered cultural contribution of Greek American women and another one on the concept of the father in Italian American culture.

203-432-0061

ISS Visiting Fellow Discussion Forum featuring Toomas Ilves

Event time: 
Thursday, November 3, 2022 - 5:00pm to 6:15pm
Location: 
Horchow Hall HRCH, 103 (GM Room) See map
55 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

International Security Studies will host a discussion with the Honorable Toomas Ilves, former president of Estonia, who made his country one of the most digitally advanced in the world by spearheading cutting-edge e-governance and cyber policies. He also earned praise for his deft navigation of Estonia’s integration with Europe and NATO while managing relations with neighboring Russia, including through a massive cyber attack widely believed to have been orchestrated by the Kremlin. Join us for a wide-ranging conversation on security in Europe and beyond.
Co-sponsored by the Program in Baltic Studies at the European Studies Council, MacMillan Center.
Attendance is limited to the Yale community. Please register in advance.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

2022 Annual YaleCHESS Lecture: Antisemitisms in Weimar Germany: Evidence from Children's Tales

Event time: 
Friday, November 4, 2022 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Institution for Social and Policy Studies PROS77, The Policy Lab at ISPS See map
77 Prospect Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Robert Braun
Event description: 

Robert Braun, Assistant Professor, Sociology and Political Science, University of California - Berkeley
Professor Braun’s research focuses on civil society and intergroup relationships in times of social upheaval and has been published in the American Journal of Sociology, the Annual Review of Political Science, the American Political Science Review, the American Sociological Review, Theory and Society and Social Forces. His first book “Protectors of Pluralism” tries to explain why some local communities step up to protect victims of mass persecution while others refrain from doing so and is forthcoming at Cambridge University Press. his second book project, “Bogeymen”, traces the evolution of fear in Central Europe throughout the 19th and 20th century by studying the spread of frightful figures in children’s stories.

203-432-0061

Laura Briggs- RITM Distinguished Speaker Series

Event time: 
Thursday, October 27, 2022 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Humanities Quadrangle HQ, L01 See map
320 York Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Laura Briggs
Event description: 

Professor Briggs is an expert on U.S. and international child welfare policy and on transnational and transracial adoption. Briggs’ most recent book, Taking Children: A History of American Terror (University of California Press, 2020), examines the 400-year-old history of the United States’ use of taking children from marginalized communities—from the taking of Black and Native children during America’s founding to the Donald Trump’s policy of family separation for Central American migrants and asylum seekers at the U.S./Mexico border—as a violent tool for political ends.

Admission: 
Free

E&RS and REEES Community Lunch Seminar

Event time: 
Friday, October 28, 2022 - 12:30pm
Location: 
Event description: 

Lunch Seminar with Andrei Kureichik, Yale World Fellow 

Andrei Kureichik is a Belarusian playwright, director, publicist, and civil activist. As a writer and director prior to 2020, Andrei was especially beloved for his comedies and suspense thrillers. Following the contested presidential elections and brutal aftermath in Belarus in August 2020, Andrei gained an international following as a political playwright. Forced to flee the country as a member of the Coordination Council working with perceived winner Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya’s transition team, Andrei leveraged his creative energy to produce the documentary play “Insulted. Belarus(sia)” about the 2020 presidential elections, subsequent protests, and violent crackdown by Alexander Lukashenko’s regime in Belarus. The play has been translated into 29 languages and received 200 readings and performances across the globe. Articles about the play have been published in Plays International and Europe, Contemporary Theatre Review, the Boston Globe, Dialog, and Theatre Journal.

As a member of the Coordination Council of Belarus, he was awarded the 2020 Sakharov Prize by the European Parliament. In 2020 Andrei founded the YouTube civil rights channel “Alternative Blogovision” which in one year became one of the leaders of the Belarusian segment of YouTube with more than two million of views per month.

Open to the Yale Community Only, email european.studies@yale.edu

Lunch at 12:30pm, seminar with Andrei Kureichik at 1:10pm

PRFDHR and ESC Film: Malta Calling - Movie Screening and Q&A with film director Mauro Mondello

Event time: 
Thursday, October 13, 2022 - 3:00pm to 4:45pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Mauro Mondello - freelance reporter, war correspondent and documentary filmmaker
Event description: 

Movie screening Thursday, October 13th, 2022 (in-person; 30mn) followed immediately by Q&A session (75mn).

Malta, a tiny island-state in the Mediterranean Sea, has been a member of the European Union since January 1st, 2004, and a member of the Schengen area since December 21st, 2007. Since then Malta has shifted to become a country of immigration and has seemingly provided a golden gateway for the boatloads of people that escape the African shores in search of a better way of life. In the meanwhile, the dynamics of ethnic and race relations in the island have grown to be synonymous with migration. Within social discourse, policy and research, the emphasis is now on understanding and combatting racial discrimination. The exponential growth of anti-migrant movements in Malta is a phenomenon of large proportions, with dozens of groups on social networks and three ultra-nationalist parties. The Maltese government has been accused several times for the conditions of the reception centers where asylum seekers are hosted. While Malta continues to have no long-term integration strategy targeting refugees, they will remain the most vulnerable and marginalised group in the country, experiencing isolation and a very low level of interaction with Maltese people. ‘Malta Calling’ looks at how migration has influenced Maltese political and social discourse, becoming somehow a laboratory of populism for the whole European continent. The documentary has won the Best short documentary at Stockholm City Film Festival, Boden Film Festival, and Short Film Factory Festival.

MAURO MONDELLO is a freelance reporter, war correspondent and documentary filmmaker. In the last eight months he has been reporting from Ukraine for several international news outlets. His work mainly focuses on geopolitics, war, human rights and migration, with a special interest on the areas of Eastern Europe, Russia, the Caucasus and the Arab world, and a preference for the long-form reportage format. He has published stories and reportages for The Guardian, Die Zeit, Newlines Magazine, Sueddeutsche Zeitung, Expresso, La Stampa, La Repubblica, Avvenire, Courrier International, among others. He was selected in 2020 for the Maurice Greenberg World Fellows Program at Yale University.

Speaker:
Mauro Mondello - freelance reporter, war correspondent and documentary filmmaker
Moderator:
Lucio Gussetti - EU Visiting Fellow, European Studies Council, MacMillan Center

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

The Far Right in Greece and the Law

Event time: 
Wednesday, October 12, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
Rosenkranz Hall RKZ, 202 See map
115 Prospect Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Natalie Alikiviadou
Event description: 

Natalie Alkiviadou is Senior Research Fellow at Danish think-tank Justitia. Her research focuses on free speech, ‘hate speech’ and the far-right with 2 Routledge monographs and a range of peer-reviewed articles on the themes.
This book critically evaluates the rise of the far-right in Greece, detailing the legal context in which to understand both the emergence of Golden Dawn, the far-right’s largest grouping, and the 2020 court decision, in which it was deemed to be a criminal organisation.
Golden Dawn was a political party which, for years, also functioned as a violent subculture movement, with limited to no interference by the state. This book sets out the background to its rise in Greece, tracing its development from the post-Junta era. At the same time, the book provides an assessment of the legal framework within which the far-right has operated, and the legal tools available to tackle it – including criminal law, non-discrimination law, the laws governing political parties and the public order framework, and the country’s international and European obligations. Golden Dawn functioned as both a political party and violent entity until its leadership and parliamentary members were found guilty of leading and participating in a criminal organisation. This book demonstrates that the state of impunity in which Golden Dawn’s violent hit squads functioned was both a facilitating factor for its rise, and potentially for its demise, as the group potentially felt untouchable. And its attention to how Greek Law has tackled, and failed to tackle, Golden Dawn offers a timely and more generally useful assessment of how legislation, courts and policies can best challenge the far-right.
This book will be of interest to those teaching and studying in law and politics, as well as more others, concerned with the rise of the far right and violent organizations, especially in Europe.

203-432-0061

Henry L. Stimson Lectures on World Affairs: Why Storytelling Works: Narrative as Method

Event time: 
Friday, September 30, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, Front Lawn See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Mary Sarotte
Event description: 

Mary Elise Sarotte is the inaugural holder of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Distinguished Professorship of Historical Studies at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). Sarotte earned her AB in History and Science at Harvard and her PhD in History at Yale University. She is the author or editor of six books, including most recently ‘Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate’, along with ‘The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall’ and ‘1989: The Struggle to Create Post-Cold War Europe’, both of which were selected as Financial Times Books of the Year, among other distinctions and awards. Following graduate school, Sarotte served as a White House Fellow, then joined the faculty of the University of Cambridge, where she received tenure before accepting an offer to return to the United States and teach at the University of Southern California. Sarotte is a former Humboldt Scholar, a former member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, an associate at Harvard University’s Center for European Studies, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.
Dr. Sarotte will deliver three lectures this year related to her book ‘Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate’.
The Stimson Lecture Series is held in honor of Henry L. Stimson, Yale College 1889, an attorney and statesman whose government service culminated with his tenure as secretary of war during World War II. Since 1998, the MacMillan Center and the Yale University Press have collaborated to bring distinguished diplomats and foreign policy experts to the Center to lecture on their books that are published by the Yale Press.

203-432-0061

Henry L. Stimson Lectures on World Affairs: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate

Event time: 
Thursday, September 29, 2022 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 101 (Auditorium) See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Mary Sarotte
Event description: 

Mary Elise Sarotte is the inaugural holder of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Distinguished Professorship of Historical Studies at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). Sarotte earned her AB in History and Science at Harvard and her PhD in History at Yale University. She is the author or editor of six books, including most recently ‘Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate’, along with ‘The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall’ and ‘1989: The Struggle to Create Post-Cold War Europe’, both of which were selected as Financial Times Books of the Year, among other distinctions and awards. Following graduate school, Sarotte served as a White House Fellow, then joined the faculty of the University of Cambridge, where she received tenure before accepting an offer to return to the United States and teach at the University of Southern California. Sarotte is a former Humboldt Scholar, a former member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, an associate at Harvard University’s Center for European Studies, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.
Dr. Sarotte will deliver three lectures this year related to her book ‘Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate’. This event will be followed by a small reception.
The Stimson Lecture Series is held in honor of Henry L. Stimson, Yale College 1889, an attorney and statesman whose government service culminated with his tenure as secretary of war during World War II. Since 1998, the MacMillan Center and the Yale University Press have collaborated to bring distinguished diplomats and foreign policy experts to the Center to lecture on their books that are published by the Yale Press.

203-432-0061
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