Undergraduate

PRFDHR Seminar: Understanding the Causal Impact of Climate on Human Conflict, Professor Marshall Burke

Event time: 
Tuesday, October 26, 2021 - 2:30pm to 3:45pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Marshall Burke, Stanford University - Department of Earth System Science and Center on Food Security and the Environment
Event description: 

Scholars, writers, and policymakers from Shakespeare to Obama have noted linkages between the physical environment and human behavior toward one another. Professor Burke synthesizes a growing cottage industry of research that seeks to quantitatively measure how changes in climate can affect various types of human conflict. He re-analyzes dozens of individual studies using a common empirical framework and uses Bayesian techniques to study whether – and why – effect sizes differ across settings. Professor Burke finds robust linkages between increasing temperature and multiple types of human violence, including individual level violence (e.g. homicide), organized group violence (e.g. civil war), and self-harm. He then draws implications for a world that continues to warm.
Marshall Burke is associate professor in the Department of Earth System Science and center fellow at the Center on Food Security and the Environment at Stanford University, and research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research focuses on social and economic impacts of environmental change, and on measuring and understanding economic livelihoods across the developing world. His work regularly appears in both economics and scientific journals, including recent publications in Nature, Science, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and The Lancet. He holds a PhD in agricultural and resource economics from UC Berkeley, and a BA in international relations from Stanford. He is also co-founder of AtlasAI, a start-up using satellites and machine learning to measure livelihoods.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

PRFDHR Seminar: Global Mobile Inventors, Dr. Dany Bahar

Event time: 
Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - 2:30pm to 3:45pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Dany Bahar, Brown University, Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs
Event description: 

Dr. Bahar will present a comprehensive study on the dynamics of knowledge production and diffusion linked to global mobile inventors (GMIs). Together with his co-authors, Dr Bahar finds that GMIs are essential team members of the first few patents in technology classes new to the country of residence as compared to patents filed at later stages. They interpret these results as tangible evidence of GMIs facilitating the technology-specific diffusion of knowledge across nations. However, they find no evidence that innovation quality is different for patents in technologies with a larger share of GMIs present as inventors in the first few patents.
Dr. Dany Bahar is an Associate Professor at Brown University, Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs and a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution’s Global Economy and Development program. An Israeli and Venezuelan economist, he is also affiliated to The Growth Lab at Harvard Center for International Development, CESifo Group Munich and IZA Institute of Labor Economics.
His research sits at the intersection of international economics and economic development. In particular, he focuses on the diffusion of technology and knowledge within and across borders, as well as topics related to structural transformation and productivity dynamics. Lately, his focus has been towards migrants and refugees as an asset in the process of economic development.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

PRFDHR Seminar: When does Migration Law Discriminate against Women?, Dr. Catherine Briddick

Event time: 
Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 2:30pm to 3:45pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Catherine Briddick, University of Oxford - Refugee Studies Centre, Department of International Development
Event description: 

It is possible to identify gendered disadvantage at almost every point in a migrant woman’s journey, physical and legal, from country of origin to country of destination, from admission to naturalization. Rules which explicitly distribute migration opportunities differently on the grounds of sex/gender, such as prohibitions on certain women’s emigration, may produce such disadvantage. Women may also, however, be disadvantaged by facially gender-neutral rules. Examples of indirectly disadvantageous provisions include those which classify certain forms of labor as either ‘low’ or ‘high skilled’, using this categorization to distribute migration opportunities differentially. Such rules may disproportionately affect the mostly female workers whose labor in certain fields is considered ‘low-skilled’ in comparison to that undertaken by their predominantly male, ‘skilled’ counterparts. Scholars have identified the diverse ways in which states’ immigration and nationality laws continue to involve gendered and racialized exclusion, subordination and violence. Migration control practices, including those concerned with deterrence, detention and deportation, have also been impugned on these bases. The presentation by Dr. Catherine Briddick draws on this literature to examine whether rules that produce gendered disadvantage are open to challenge under the international legal regime charged with eradicating discrimination against women, the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). Particular attention will be paid to the protection CEDAW offers, or purports to offer, to women seeking international protection.
Catherine Briddick is the Martin James Departmental Lecturer in Gender and International Human Rights and Refugee Law at the Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Department of International Development at the University of Oxford, UK. She is also the Course Director for the MSc in Refugee and Forced Migration Studies at RSC and the Principal Investigator of Undoing Discriminatory Borders.
Dr. Briddick has over ten years’ experience researching, providing legal advice and engaging in legal advocacy on issues relating to gender, forced migration and human rights in the UK. She has practiced as a barrister, representing individuals before Courts and Tribunals in addition to having managed and delivered legal advice and information services in the not-for-profit sector.
She received her Master of Laws (Legum Magister) in Human Rights Law from the London School of Economics with Distinction. Her doctoral research, undertaken in the Faculty of Law at the University of Oxford, focused on migration status and violence against women to evaluate four selected ‘regimes of exception’. Her work has been published in journals including Social & Legal Studies and the Journal of Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Law. She has also contributed chapters in books like ‘Research Handbook on International Refugee Law’ and ‘The Oxford Handbook of International Refugee Law’, and written in several platforms including The Conversation and the RSC’s Rethinking Refuge.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

Notturno – Movie Screening, Talk and Q&A

Event time: 
Wednesday, October 6, 2021 - 6:30pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Elinda Labropoulou and Muthanna Khriesat - 2021 Maurice R. Greenberg World Fellows Ulla Kasten - Research Fellow at the Council on Middle East Studies at the Yale MacMillan Center
Event description: 

Movie screening available on demand from Saturday October 2nd until Tuesday October 5th, 2021 (inclusive) to be followed by Panel and Q&A session on Wednesday, October 6th, 2021.
Filmed over three years on the borders between Iraq, Kurdistan, Syria and Lebanon, Notturno captures the everyday life that lies behind the continuing tragedy of civil wars, ferocious dictatorships, foreign invasions and the murderous apocalypse of ISIS. Oscar® nominated and multiple award winner Gianfranco Rosi (SACRO GRA, FIRE AT SEA) constructs a sublime cinematic journey through the region finding peace and light within the chaos and despair in the aftermath of war. A mosaic of intimate moments and luminous images, Notturno is a profound and urgent cinematic achievement, from a master of the documentary form.
2021 World Fellows Elinda Labropoulou and Muthanna Khriesat will discuss the film and their experiences while working with refugees and youths in Greece, Northern Africa and the Middle East and will examine the similarities of victims of war in their struggle to survive. Moderated by Ulla Kasten, Archaeologist and Research Fellow at the Council on Middle East Studies and previous curator of the Yale Babylonian Collection.
Please submit your questions in advance to refugees@yale.edu or during the Q&A session on Wednesday, October 6th, 2021.
Panelists/Speakers:
•Elinda Labropoulou, Senior Journalist and Sustainable Entrepreneur; and 2021 World Fellow
•Muthanna Khriesat, Chief Operating Officer – Questscope; and 2021 World Fellow
Moderator:
•Ulla Kasten, Research Fellow at the Council on Middle East Studies at the Yale MacMillan Center

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

ESC Welcome Gathering

Event time: 
Wednesday, October 6, 2021 - 12:00pm
Location: 
Tent at Rosenkranz Hall See map
115 Prospect Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Lunch reception to welcome European Studies visitors, new ESC affiliates, and new and returning fellows of our undergraduate and graduate networks.

 

This event is invite only; to RSVP, please indiciate via the e-invitation received by October 4th.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

Career Conversations with Human Rights Lawyer Liz Jordan

Event time: 
Wednesday, September 15, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
Online See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Liz Jordan
Event description: 

The Councils on Latin American & Iberian Studies and European Studies will host a discussion with alumna and renowned human rights lawyer, Liz Jordan.
This event is intended for current Yale students only. Please register: https://yale.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIqf-2qrzsoHNN8TwSIqM6rRGvyCUubdQ5y

Admission: 
Free
Must be current Yale student and must register.

The Asia Olympics: Past Achievements & Future Goals

Event time: 
Monday, April 19, 2021 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Susan E. Brownell
University of Missouri- St. Louis
William Kelly
Yale University
John Horne
Waseda UniversitY

203-432-0061

Career Conversations: Jake Nelson

Event time: 
Wednesday, April 14, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Jake Nelson, European Union Desk Officer, U.S. Department of State
Event description: 

Join us for an informal career and professional journey conversation with Yale E&RA MA alumnus, Jake Nelson ‘14. Jake Nelson was a Thomas R. Pickering Graduate Foreign Affairs Fellow and a Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellow in German. Since graduating, he has worked in diplomatic service, holding positions in Algeria and Germany. He is currently the Desk Officer for the European Union at the US Department of State.
This is a collaborative event between the Council on Latin American & Iberian Studies and the European Studies Council. Open to all students, particularly those in the Undergraduate and Graduate Fellows’ networks for European Studies and Latin American & Iberian Studies, including Yale-NUS students.

This talk is only open to undergraduate and graduate students of Yale University and Yale-NUS College
Register to attend virtual talk: http://bit.ly/Career-JNelson
To learn more about the networks, and to join, please visit here:
https://europeanstudies.macmillan.yale.edu/people/european-studies-gradu…
https://europeanstudies.macmillan.yale.edu/people/european-studies-under…
https://clais.macmillan.yale.edu/people/undergraduate-fellows-network
https://clais.macmillan.yale.edu/people/graduate-professional-school-stu…

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

Britain and the EU after Brexit

Event time: 
Monday, April 19, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Speaker/Performer: 
Vernon Bogdanor, Professor of Government at the Institute of Contemporary British History, King’s College, London
Event description: 

Please register at http://bit.ly/BritainEUafterBrexit
VERNON BOGDANOR CBE is Professor of Government at the Institute of Contemporary British History, King’s College, London. He was formerly for many years Professor of Government at Oxford University. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, an Honorary Fellow of the Institute for Advanced Legal Studies, a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, and a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences. He has been an adviser to a number of governments, including those of Albania, Czech Republic, Hungary, Kosovo, Israel, Mauritius. Romania, Slovakia, Sweden and Trinidad. He has written numerous books, including Beyond Brexit: Towards a British Constitution, and Britain and Europe in a Troubled World.

Sponsored by the George Herbert Walker, Jr. Lecture Fund at Yale University, the European Studies Council, and Program in European Union Studies

VIRTUAL: 2034: A Novel of the Next World War

Event time: 
Wednesday, March 10, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

The Jackson Institute for Global Affairs will host a virtual discussion with Visiting Fellow Adm. Jim Stavridis regarding his new book—his tenth, but his first work of fiction.
Stavridis is the former Supreme Allied Commander of NATO and Dean of The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He is currently an Operating Executive at The Carlyle Group.
2034: A Novel of the Next World War, is a geopolitical thriller that imagines a naval clash between the United States and China in the South China Sea, and the path from there to a global confrontation. Featured as a six-part series in Wired Magazine, 2034 is written as a disturbingly plausible work of speculative fiction. The novel takes us inside the minds of American, Chinese, Iranian, Russian, and Indian officials, as a series of miscalculations on all sides leads the world into an intensifying international storm.
How can the United States and China prevent strategic competition from spiraling into conflict? How can works of fiction inspire creative, innovative approaches to Sino-American relations?
The conversation will be moderated by Paul Kennedy, J. Richardson Dilworth Professor of History and Global Affairs.
Jackson Visiting Fellows are distinguished practitioners invited to participate in an immersive multi-day program on the Yale campus, highlighting their extraordinary contributions to global affairs. They enrich the Jackson and broader university community through attending classes, giving public talks, and interacting with students and faculty through a variety of engaging events.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
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