Undergraduate

Transitional Justice from a Gender Perspective - Special Webinar Workshop

Event time: 
Thursday, December 2, 2021 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Women’s Groups Waving Truths in Conflict Scenarios
DESCRIPTION:
This session will present different examples on Truth Commissions, Women´s Courts, People´s Tribunals and other tools that promote visibility and dignity among protagonists (victims/survivors/subjects of rights) in the so called “post-conflict” scenarios. There is a strong emphasis on case studies, basically focused on women´s groups from Latin America and Europe that have experienced wars and forced migration (Colombia, Guatemala, Balkans and Migrants in Greece). The main approach in the presentation is applied knowledge based on gender, generational, ethnic and community perspectives.
BIO:
Professor Arancha Garcia del Soto, has worked with victims of war and structural violence since 1993 (Balkans). She is currently accompanying Human Right Defenders in Honduras and Colombia providing them with online psychosocial support, and collaborating with EQUITAS, Colombia (forensic work and support to the families of the disappeared), and with UNATE Cantabria, Spain (The Permanent University for Senior People). Until December 2019 she was working for the Colombian Truth Commission, within its Exile Team, coordinating the work with the Colombian victims/survivors in Europe and the US, under the supervision of Carlos M. Beristain.

She taught and worked in 2006-2009 at the Institute of International Humanitarian Affairs (IIHA) of Fordham University in New York City. Previously, she was the Director of Refugee Initiatives, at the Solomon Asch Center for the Study of Ethnopolitical Conflict, of the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia (2002-2006). In the Fall Semester of 2012, she held the position of “Global Peace Leader” at Haverford College, PA, and she has been holding workshops at this Campus once yearly since then.

She has taught and practiced international human rights work in Europe, Colombia, Africa, Sri Lanka, and Mediterranean countries with migrants, refugees and IDPs, mostly implementing protection and psychosocial projects for conflicts´ victims. In 2011 she came back to Asturias, Spain where she is currently based after spending 9 years working overseas, with base in the US.

A Doctor Member of the Center for the Advanced Studies of the Social Sciences, CEACS, at the Juan March Foundation in Madrid, Spain, she teaches short courses to graduates in Masters, and mentors Ph.D. work on Humanitarian work and Migration in different continents. She holds a degree in Social Psychology by the University Pontificia de Salamanca in Spain. A Masters in Social Sciences by the CEACS (Center for Advanced Social Studies) at the Juan March Foundation in Madrid, and a Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Salamanca (awarded with the “Premio Extraordinario” and “Premio Nicolas Pérez Serrano del Centro de Estudios Constitucionales”). She supports research, training, and applied work on (1) Community well-being, (2) Gender and SGBV- Sexual Gender based Violence, (3) Generational and Cultural approaches, and (4) Migrant and Refugee Women’s Networks. Her main interests are applied knowledge in gender and generational differences, and the community and do-no-harm approaches when working with protagonists (victims/survivors/ rights holders) in conflict and post-conflict contexts.

She has implemented work on trauma, collective and individual harm assessments for trials on Gender Based Violence, psychosocial support of witnesses and victims, mapping of Internally Displaced Persons, and design of quantitative and qualitative tools to deepen on the impacts of violence.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
Register via link below

Between Turkish Nationalism and Greek Irredentism: The Greek Orthodox Community of Istanbul (ca. 1908-1923)

Event time: 
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Dimitris Kamouzis
Event description: 

Dimitris Kamouzis is a Researcher at the Centre for Asia Minor Studies (Athens, Greece). He received his PhD in History at the Department of Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies, King’s College London. He has written several articles on the Greek Orthodox populations of the Ottoman Empire/Turkey and is co-editor of the collective volume State – Nationalisms in the Ottoman Empire, Greece and Turkey: Orthodox and Muslims, 1830-1945 (Oxon: SOAS/ Routledge Studies on the Middle East, 2013). His research interests include Non-Muslim Minorities in the Ottoman Empire/Turkey, Greek-Turkish Relations, History of the Greek Diaspora, Oral History, Refugee Studies, and the History of Humanitarianism.
Sponsored by the Hellenic Studies Program at Yale University. The activities of the Hellenic Studies Program are generously funded by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Center for Hellenic Studies at Yale University.

203-432-0061

Career Conversations Hour: REEES Alumni on non-academic professions

Event time: 
Thursday, October 28, 2021 - 4:30pm to 5:45pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Wondering what a career related to Russian, East European, & Eurasian Studies might look like, and how to pursue it successfully? Come hear alums from several REEESNe institutions (large and small, public and private) talk about how their studies of this part of the world prepared them for non-academic professions and how they have navigated careers in areas ranging from development and investing to government accountability, from journalism to environmental and human rights non-profits. This hour-long webinar (4:30-5:30 Eastern) will include presentations from alumni, a student Q&A session with the speakers, and a resume/C.V. session to help you think about how to position yourself for different types of careers. Stay for an optional additional Q&A (5:30-5:45) to learn more about how the speakers have crafted their own job application materials. The webinar is intended mostly for undergraduate and masters-level students in REEESNe institutions, a network of universities and colleges in the northeastern United States administered through Yale’s REEES program, but is open to any students, faculty, and administrators who care to join by registering here: https://bit.ly/3iO4tVB
Featured speakers:
Austin Barvin (Analyst, US Government Accountability Office)
Dawn Seckler (Director of Development, Bridgeway Capital)
Aliya Uteuova (Environmental Justice/Data Journalist, The Guardian)
Kate Watters (Co-founder & Executive Director, Crude Accountability)

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

PRFDHR Seminar: Understanding the Causal Impact of Climate on Human Conflict, Professor Marshall Burke

Event time: 
Tuesday, October 26, 2021 - 2:30pm to 3:45pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Marshall Burke, Stanford University - Department of Earth System Science and Center on Food Security and the Environment
Event description: 

Scholars, writers, and policymakers from Shakespeare to Obama have noted linkages between the physical environment and human behavior toward one another. Professor Burke synthesizes a growing cottage industry of research that seeks to quantitatively measure how changes in climate can affect various types of human conflict. He re-analyzes dozens of individual studies using a common empirical framework and uses Bayesian techniques to study whether – and why – effect sizes differ across settings. Professor Burke finds robust linkages between increasing temperature and multiple types of human violence, including individual level violence (e.g. homicide), organized group violence (e.g. civil war), and self-harm. He then draws implications for a world that continues to warm.
Marshall Burke is associate professor in the Department of Earth System Science and center fellow at the Center on Food Security and the Environment at Stanford University, and research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research focuses on social and economic impacts of environmental change, and on measuring and understanding economic livelihoods across the developing world. His work regularly appears in both economics and scientific journals, including recent publications in Nature, Science, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and The Lancet. He holds a PhD in agricultural and resource economics from UC Berkeley, and a BA in international relations from Stanford. He is also co-founder of AtlasAI, a start-up using satellites and machine learning to measure livelihoods.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

PRFDHR Seminar: Global Mobile Inventors, Dr. Dany Bahar

Event time: 
Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - 2:30pm to 3:45pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Dany Bahar, Brown University, Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs
Event description: 

Dr. Bahar will present a comprehensive study on the dynamics of knowledge production and diffusion linked to global mobile inventors (GMIs). Together with his co-authors, Dr Bahar finds that GMIs are essential team members of the first few patents in technology classes new to the country of residence as compared to patents filed at later stages. They interpret these results as tangible evidence of GMIs facilitating the technology-specific diffusion of knowledge across nations. However, they find no evidence that innovation quality is different for patents in technologies with a larger share of GMIs present as inventors in the first few patents.
Dr. Dany Bahar is an Associate Professor at Brown University, Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs and a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution’s Global Economy and Development program. An Israeli and Venezuelan economist, he is also affiliated to The Growth Lab at Harvard Center for International Development, CESifo Group Munich and IZA Institute of Labor Economics.
His research sits at the intersection of international economics and economic development. In particular, he focuses on the diffusion of technology and knowledge within and across borders, as well as topics related to structural transformation and productivity dynamics. Lately, his focus has been towards migrants and refugees as an asset in the process of economic development.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

PRFDHR Seminar: When does Migration Law Discriminate against Women?, Dr. Catherine Briddick

Event time: 
Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 2:30pm to 3:45pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Catherine Briddick, University of Oxford - Refugee Studies Centre, Department of International Development
Event description: 

It is possible to identify gendered disadvantage at almost every point in a migrant woman’s journey, physical and legal, from country of origin to country of destination, from admission to naturalization. Rules which explicitly distribute migration opportunities differently on the grounds of sex/gender, such as prohibitions on certain women’s emigration, may produce such disadvantage. Women may also, however, be disadvantaged by facially gender-neutral rules. Examples of indirectly disadvantageous provisions include those which classify certain forms of labor as either ‘low’ or ‘high skilled’, using this categorization to distribute migration opportunities differentially. Such rules may disproportionately affect the mostly female workers whose labor in certain fields is considered ‘low-skilled’ in comparison to that undertaken by their predominantly male, ‘skilled’ counterparts. Scholars have identified the diverse ways in which states’ immigration and nationality laws continue to involve gendered and racialized exclusion, subordination and violence. Migration control practices, including those concerned with deterrence, detention and deportation, have also been impugned on these bases. The presentation by Dr. Catherine Briddick draws on this literature to examine whether rules that produce gendered disadvantage are open to challenge under the international legal regime charged with eradicating discrimination against women, the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). Particular attention will be paid to the protection CEDAW offers, or purports to offer, to women seeking international protection.
Catherine Briddick is the Martin James Departmental Lecturer in Gender and International Human Rights and Refugee Law at the Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Department of International Development at the University of Oxford, UK. She is also the Course Director for the MSc in Refugee and Forced Migration Studies at RSC and the Principal Investigator of Undoing Discriminatory Borders.
Dr. Briddick has over ten years’ experience researching, providing legal advice and engaging in legal advocacy on issues relating to gender, forced migration and human rights in the UK. She has practiced as a barrister, representing individuals before Courts and Tribunals in addition to having managed and delivered legal advice and information services in the not-for-profit sector.
She received her Master of Laws (Legum Magister) in Human Rights Law from the London School of Economics with Distinction. Her doctoral research, undertaken in the Faculty of Law at the University of Oxford, focused on migration status and violence against women to evaluate four selected ‘regimes of exception’. Her work has been published in journals including Social & Legal Studies and the Journal of Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Law. She has also contributed chapters in books like ‘Research Handbook on International Refugee Law’ and ‘The Oxford Handbook of International Refugee Law’, and written in several platforms including The Conversation and the RSC’s Rethinking Refuge.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

Notturno – Movie Screening, Talk and Q&A

Event time: 
Wednesday, October 6, 2021 - 6:30pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
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Speaker/Performer: 
Elinda Labropoulou and Muthanna Khriesat - 2021 Maurice R. Greenberg World Fellows Ulla Kasten - Research Fellow at the Council on Middle East Studies at the Yale MacMillan Center
Event description: 

Movie screening available on demand from Saturday October 2nd until Tuesday October 5th, 2021 (inclusive) to be followed by Panel and Q&A session on Wednesday, October 6th, 2021.
Filmed over three years on the borders between Iraq, Kurdistan, Syria and Lebanon, Notturno captures the everyday life that lies behind the continuing tragedy of civil wars, ferocious dictatorships, foreign invasions and the murderous apocalypse of ISIS. Oscar® nominated and multiple award winner Gianfranco Rosi (SACRO GRA, FIRE AT SEA) constructs a sublime cinematic journey through the region finding peace and light within the chaos and despair in the aftermath of war. A mosaic of intimate moments and luminous images, Notturno is a profound and urgent cinematic achievement, from a master of the documentary form.
2021 World Fellows Elinda Labropoulou and Muthanna Khriesat will discuss the film and their experiences while working with refugees and youths in Greece, Northern Africa and the Middle East and will examine the similarities of victims of war in their struggle to survive. Moderated by Ulla Kasten, Archaeologist and Research Fellow at the Council on Middle East Studies and previous curator of the Yale Babylonian Collection.
Please submit your questions in advance to refugees@yale.edu or during the Q&A session on Wednesday, October 6th, 2021.
Panelists/Speakers:
•Elinda Labropoulou, Senior Journalist and Sustainable Entrepreneur; and 2021 World Fellow
•Muthanna Khriesat, Chief Operating Officer – Questscope; and 2021 World Fellow
Moderator:
•Ulla Kasten, Research Fellow at the Council on Middle East Studies at the Yale MacMillan Center

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

ESC Welcome Gathering

Event time: 
Wednesday, October 6, 2021 - 12:00pm
Location: 
Tent at Rosenkranz Hall See map
115 Prospect Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Lunch reception to welcome European Studies visitors, new ESC affiliates, and new and returning fellows of our undergraduate and graduate networks.

 

This event is invite only; to RSVP, please indiciate via the e-invitation received by October 4th.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

Career Conversations with Human Rights Lawyer Liz Jordan

Event time: 
Wednesday, September 15, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
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34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Liz Jordan
Event description: 

The Councils on Latin American & Iberian Studies and European Studies will host a discussion with alumna and renowned human rights lawyer, Liz Jordan.
This event is intended for current Yale students only. Please register: https://yale.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIqf-2qrzsoHNN8TwSIqM6rRGvyCUubdQ5y

Admission: 
Free
Must be current Yale student and must register.

The Asia Olympics: Past Achievements & Future Goals

Event time: 
Monday, April 19, 2021 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Location: 
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Event description: 

Susan E. Brownell
University of Missouri- St. Louis
William Kelly
Yale University
John Horne
Waseda UniversitY

203-432-0061
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