Graduate And Professional

AY and Summer Funding for Undergraduate, Graduate and Professional Students

Event time: 
Friday, November 18, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
Virtual See map
Event description: 

The Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale offers funding for language study, internships, dissertation research, independent projects, and presenting at conferences.
All funding opportunities are listed on the Student Grants Database: https://yale.communityforce.com/Funds/Search.aspx
The information will be updated by October 1.

Admission: 
Free

(203) 436-8164

The War in Ukraine: Where do we go from here?

Event time: 
Wednesday, September 28, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
Horchow Hall HRCH, 103 (GM Room) See map
55 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

With the Russian war in Ukraine entering its eighth month, what are the prospects for resolution? Can either Russia or Ukraine “win” the war in any meaningful way? Do the US and Europe have enough domestic political resolve to continue supporting Ukraine with critical resources as they face the possibility of warfare persisting into a second winter? Although Ukraine has maintained control over most of its territory and recently launched a counter-offensive in a bid to retake some territory, Vladimir Putin is expanding the size of the Russian armed forces and continues to insist that the “special military operation” has the broad aim of “de-nazifying” Ukraine.
Join Timothy Snyder, the Richard C. Levin Professor of History, Arne Westad, the Elihu Professor of History and Global Affairs and Director of International Security Studies, and Serhii Plokhii, the Mykhailo S. Hrushevs’kyi Professor of Ukrainian History, Harvard University, for a discussion of the war’s future implications for Ukraine, Russia, and global order.
This event is being held in person and will be live-streamed.
In-person attendance is open to members of the Yale campus community with Yale ID (please register via EventBrite).
There is no need to register to watch the live stream.

AY and Summer Funding for Undergraduate, Graduate and Professional Students

Event time: 
Friday, October 7, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
Virtual See map
Event description: 

The Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale offers funding for language study, internships, dissertation research, independent projects, and presenting at conferences.
All funding opportunities are listed on the Student Grants Database: https://yale.communityforce.com/Funds/Search.aspx
The information will be updated by October 1.

Admission: 
Free

(203) 436-8164

Exhibition Curators' Talk: "Subjects and Objects: Slavic Collections at Yale, 1896–2022"

Event time: 
Tuesday, September 13, 2022 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Sterling Memorial Library SML, Lecture Hall See map
120 High Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Curators: Anna Arays and Liliya Dashevski,
Event description: 

Please join us to celebrate the opening of “Subjects and Objects: Slavic Collections at Yale, 1896–2022,” which is on view in the Hanke Exhibition Gallery, Sterling Memorial Library.
Curators Anna Arays and Liliya Dashevski will discuss their exhibition and will be available for questions and conversation over light refreshments afterward.
No registration is necessary.
Note: Please see the library’s COVID updates to current public health protocols: https://library.yale.edu/news/covid-library-updates

Admission: 
Free

203-432-1072

Windham-Campbell Festival: Choral Performance: Intimate Strangers

Event time: 
Tuesday, September 20, 2022 - 6:00pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library BRBL, Mezzanine See map
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Emmanuel Iduma, Sara Serpa
Event description: 

A collaboration between Portuguese vocalist-composer Sara Serpa and Nigerian writer Emmanuel Iduma, drawing inspiration from Iduma’s book, A Stranger’s Pose, a unique blend of travelogue, musings and poetry. In a combination of music, text, image, and field recordings collected by Iduma during his travels, Intimate Strangers explores such themes as of movement, home, grief, absence, and desire in what Iduma calls “an atlas of a borderless world.”

Admission: 
Free
All festival events are free and open to the public. Audience members must be vaccinated and boosted and should be prepared to show proof of vaccination. Masks will be required at most indoor events.

PRFDHR Seminar: Ordinary People Under Extreme Life Conditions: Internal and External Forced Displacement from War-Torn Territories in Ukraine, Professor Oksana Mikheieva

Event time: 
Tuesday, October 4, 2022 - 12:30pm to 1:45pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Oksana Mikheieva, European University Viadrina (Frankfurt) and Ukrainian Catholic University (Lviv) - Departments of Sociology
Event description: 

The start of Russian aggression against Ukraine in 2014 led to the temporary occupation of the Crimea peninsula and parts of Donetsk and Luhansk region. With the beginning of Russian aggression more than 2 million people have left the uncontrolled territories of Ukraine and were forced to move both to other parts of Ukraine and beyond its borders. According to the Ministry of Social Policy, after 2015 and before the full-scale Russian invasion began on 24 February 2022, the number of registered internally displaced persons (IDPs) was relatively stable at around 1.5 million. Residents of war-torn territories have also been fleeing the country since 2014. As of December 2015, in the countries that have common borders with Ukraine, such as Russia, Belarus, Poland, Slovakia, Hungary, Moldova, there were 388,690 Ukrainians seeking refuge, and 730,100 Ukrainians seeking other forms of legal stay in the aforementioned countries. The estimated population of the occupied territories of Donetsk and Luhansk regions is 3.7 million. These are mostly people who formally remain the citizens of Ukraine.

At this stage of the war started in 2014, Ukraine was deprived of control over part of its state borders, facing the problem of the so-called ‘lines of demarcation’ occurring instead in the Donetsk and Luhansk areas and Crimea. Having turned the internal territories into the actual border areas, these demarcation lines changed the everyday life of the average citizens of Ukraine. All of this became a new reality for ordinary people who were involved to varying degrees in this conflict.

Professor Mikheieva will talk about how the Russian aggression of 2014 has changed people’s daily lives in Ukraine, what challenges Ukrainian society has encountered, and what problems people who were forced to leave their homes have faced. The study of the everyday experience of IDPs is based on a series of semi-structured in-depth interviews conducted by Professor Mikheieva between 2014 and 2018 (over 300 interviews). She will also focus on the specifics of current forced migration inside and outside of Ukraine caused by Russia’s full-fledged aggression against Ukraine in 2022.

Professor Oksana Mikheieva is a DAAD Professor at the European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), Germany. She is also Professor of Sociology at the Ukrainian Catholic University (Lviv). In the spring semesters of 2020 and 2022 she was visiting lecturer at the Jagiellonian University (Krakow, Poland).  She has also participated in more than 20 sociological research projects, in 10 of which she was a principal investigator. Mikheieva has over twenty years of research and teaching experience. She researches a wide range of areas, including the historical aspects of deviant and delinquent behavior, urban studies, paramilitary motivations, forced displacement, migration. In 2016 she was a Visiting Professor in Ukraine European Dialogue at the Institute for Human Science (Vienna), and in 2015 she was Eugene and Daymel Shklar Research Fellow Harvard University, Ukrainian Research Institute.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

PRFDHR Seminar: Refuge: How the State Shapes Human Potential, Professor Heba Gowayed

Event time: 
Tuesday, September 20, 2022 - 4:00pm to 5:15pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Heba Gowayed, Boston University - Department of Sociology
Event description: 

Drawing on a global and comparative ethnography, this presentation explores how Syrian men and women seeking refuge in a moment of unprecedented global displacement are received by countries of resettlement and asylum—the U.S., Canada, and Germany. It shows that human capital, typically examined as the skills immigrants bring with them that shape their potential, is actually created, transformed, or destroyed by receiving states’ incorporation policies. Since these policies derive from historically informed and unequal approaches to social welfare, refugees’ experiences raise a mirror to how states (re)produce inequality.
Heba Gowayed is the Moorman-Simon Assistant Professor of Sociology at Boston University.
Her research, which is global and comparative, examines how low-income people traverse social services, immigration laws, and their associated bureaucracies, while grappling with gender and racial inequalities. Her writing has appeared in academic outlets as well as in public outlets including Slate, Al Jazeera English, The New Humanitarian, and Teen Vogue.
Sponsored By: Program on Refugees, Forced Displacement, and Humanitarian Responses (PRFDHR) and the Yale Center of Race, Indigeneity, and Transnational Migration (RITM)

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

Yale Library Book Talk: Samuel Moyn

Event time: 
Wednesday, May 4, 2022 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Online See map
Speaker/Performer: 
Samuel Moyn, Henry R. Luce Professor of Jurisprudence at Yale Law School and Professor of History; Bruce Ackerman, Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science
Event description: 

Samuel Moyn will discuss his new book “Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War”
Yale Law School and History Department Professor Samuel Moyn’s new book asks a troubling but urgent question: What if efforts to make war more ethical—-to ban torture and limit civilian casualties—-have only shored up the military enterprise and made it sturdier? Professor Moyn will be in discussion with Bruce Ackerman, Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
anna.arays@yale.edu

203-432-1072

Writing the History of the Ford Foundation

Event time: 
Monday, April 18, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
Allwin Hall ALW See map
31 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

International Security Studies will host a presentation by Professor David Cannadine, a historian from Princeton University who will discuss his new project on the history of the Ford Foundation.
Professor Sir David Cannadine is Dodge Professor of History at Princeton University, Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford and former President of the British Academy (2017-2021). He is author of many books, including: Victorious Century: The United Kingdom, 1800-1906, The Decline and Fall of the British Aristocracy, Class in Britain, Ornamentalism, The Undivided Past, and biographies of G.M Trevelyan, Andrew W. Mellon, King George V and Margaret Thatcher.
Cannadine has helped transform public perception of key historical figures (namely politicians) through his BBC Radio 4 Series Prime Ministers Props and his latest book Churchill, The Statesman as Artist which provides the most important account yet of Winston Churchill’s life in art. He is a Trustee of the Wolfson Foundation, the Gladstone Library and many more. He sits on the Bank of England Banknote Advisory Committee and is a Vice President of the Victorian Society. Cannadine is the editor of the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. He became the 168th president of the Birmingham & Midland Institute in 2021.
The conversation will be moderated by Arne Westad, ISS director and the Elihu Professor of History and Global Affairs at Yale.
The in-person event is open to members of the Yale campus community with Yale ID.

Admission: 
Free

Perspectives on Language, Ethnicity, Nation in the Russian-Ukrainian Conflict

Event time: 
Friday, March 25, 2022 - 7:30pm to 8:15pm
Location: 
Online See map
Speaker/Performer: 
Dr. Asya Pereltsvaig, Dr. Volodymyr Dibrova, Dr. Roslyn Burns
Event description: 

On February 24, 2022, Russian military forces entered the sovereign nation of Ukraine leaving many around the world in shock and disbelief. Those familiar with Russian history, however, noticed echoes from the past.

We invite you to join our educational discussion panel where three linguists contextualize different aspects of the on-going conflict. Each panelist has expertise in different areas of Russian and Ukrainian history and how concepts related to language, ethnicity, and national identity shape political conflicts in the region.
Co-sponsored by the Department of Linguistics

After presentations, there will be Q & A.

online, free, open to the public with pre-registration

203-432-1072
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