Faculty

PRFDHR Seminar: Ordinary People Under Extreme Life Conditions: Internal and External Forced Displacement from War-Torn Territories in Ukraine, Professor Oksana Mikheieva

Event time: 
Tuesday, October 4, 2022 - 12:30pm to 1:45pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Oksana Mikheieva, European University Viadrina (Frankfurt) and Ukrainian Catholic University (Lviv) - Departments of Sociology
Event description: 

The start of Russian aggression against Ukraine in 2014 led to the temporary occupation of the Crimea peninsula and parts of Donetsk and Luhansk region. With the beginning of Russian aggression more than 2 million people have left the uncontrolled territories of Ukraine and were forced to move both to other parts of Ukraine and beyond its borders. According to the Ministry of Social Policy, after 2015 and before the full-scale Russian invasion began on 24 February 2022, the number of registered internally displaced persons (IDPs) was relatively stable at around 1.5 million. Residents of war-torn territories have also been fleeing the country since 2014. As of December 2015, in the countries that have common borders with Ukraine, such as Russia, Belarus, Poland, Slovakia, Hungary, Moldova, there were 388,690 Ukrainians seeking refuge, and 730,100 Ukrainians seeking other forms of legal stay in the aforementioned countries. The estimated population of the occupied territories of Donetsk and Luhansk regions is 3.7 million. These are mostly people who formally remain the citizens of Ukraine.

At this stage of the war started in 2014, Ukraine was deprived of control over part of its state borders, facing the problem of the so-called ‘lines of demarcation’ occurring instead in the Donetsk and Luhansk areas and Crimea. Having turned the internal territories into the actual border areas, these demarcation lines changed the everyday life of the average citizens of Ukraine. All of this became a new reality for ordinary people who were involved to varying degrees in this conflict.

Professor Mikheieva will talk about how the Russian aggression of 2014 has changed people’s daily lives in Ukraine, what challenges Ukrainian society has encountered, and what problems people who were forced to leave their homes have faced. The study of the everyday experience of IDPs is based on a series of semi-structured in-depth interviews conducted by Professor Mikheieva between 2014 and 2018 (over 300 interviews). She will also focus on the specifics of current forced migration inside and outside of Ukraine caused by Russia’s full-fledged aggression against Ukraine in 2022.

Professor Oksana Mikheieva is a DAAD Professor at the European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), Germany. She is also Professor of Sociology at the Ukrainian Catholic University (Lviv). In the spring semesters of 2020 and 2022 she was visiting lecturer at the Jagiellonian University (Krakow, Poland).  She has also participated in more than 20 sociological research projects, in 10 of which she was a principal investigator. Mikheieva has over twenty years of research and teaching experience. She researches a wide range of areas, including the historical aspects of deviant and delinquent behavior, urban studies, paramilitary motivations, forced displacement, migration. In 2016 she was a Visiting Professor in Ukraine European Dialogue at the Institute for Human Science (Vienna), and in 2015 she was Eugene and Daymel Shklar Research Fellow Harvard University, Ukrainian Research Institute.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

PRFDHR Seminar: Refuge: How the State Shapes Human Potential, Professor Heba Gowayed

Event time: 
Tuesday, September 20, 2022 - 4:00pm to 5:15pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Heba Gowayed, Boston University - Department of Sociology
Event description: 

Drawing on a global and comparative ethnography, this presentation explores how Syrian men and women seeking refuge in a moment of unprecedented global displacement are received by countries of resettlement and asylum—the U.S., Canada, and Germany. It shows that human capital, typically examined as the skills immigrants bring with them that shape their potential, is actually created, transformed, or destroyed by receiving states’ incorporation policies. Since these policies derive from historically informed and unequal approaches to social welfare, refugees’ experiences raise a mirror to how states (re)produce inequality.
Heba Gowayed is the Moorman-Simon Assistant Professor of Sociology at Boston University.
Her research, which is global and comparative, examines how low-income people traverse social services, immigration laws, and their associated bureaucracies, while grappling with gender and racial inequalities. Her writing has appeared in academic outlets as well as in public outlets including Slate, Al Jazeera English, The New Humanitarian, and Teen Vogue.
Sponsored By: Program on Refugees, Forced Displacement, and Humanitarian Responses (PRFDHR) and the Yale Center of Race, Indigeneity, and Transnational Migration (RITM)

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

Yale Library Book Talk: Samuel Moyn

Event time: 
Wednesday, May 4, 2022 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Online See map
Speaker/Performer: 
Samuel Moyn, Henry R. Luce Professor of Jurisprudence at Yale Law School and Professor of History; Bruce Ackerman, Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science
Event description: 

Samuel Moyn will discuss his new book “Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War”
Yale Law School and History Department Professor Samuel Moyn’s new book asks a troubling but urgent question: What if efforts to make war more ethical—-to ban torture and limit civilian casualties—-have only shored up the military enterprise and made it sturdier? Professor Moyn will be in discussion with Bruce Ackerman, Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
anna.arays@yale.edu

203-432-1072

Writing the History of the Ford Foundation

Event time: 
Monday, April 18, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
Allwin Hall ALW See map
31 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

International Security Studies will host a presentation by Professor David Cannadine, a historian from Princeton University who will discuss his new project on the history of the Ford Foundation.
Professor Sir David Cannadine is Dodge Professor of History at Princeton University, Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford and former President of the British Academy (2017-2021). He is author of many books, including: Victorious Century: The United Kingdom, 1800-1906, The Decline and Fall of the British Aristocracy, Class in Britain, Ornamentalism, The Undivided Past, and biographies of G.M Trevelyan, Andrew W. Mellon, King George V and Margaret Thatcher.
Cannadine has helped transform public perception of key historical figures (namely politicians) through his BBC Radio 4 Series Prime Ministers Props and his latest book Churchill, The Statesman as Artist which provides the most important account yet of Winston Churchill’s life in art. He is a Trustee of the Wolfson Foundation, the Gladstone Library and many more. He sits on the Bank of England Banknote Advisory Committee and is a Vice President of the Victorian Society. Cannadine is the editor of the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. He became the 168th president of the Birmingham & Midland Institute in 2021.
The conversation will be moderated by Arne Westad, ISS director and the Elihu Professor of History and Global Affairs at Yale.
The in-person event is open to members of the Yale campus community with Yale ID.

Admission: 
Free

Perspectives on Language, Ethnicity, Nation in the Russian-Ukrainian Conflict

Event time: 
Friday, March 25, 2022 - 7:30pm to 8:15pm
Location: 
Online See map
Speaker/Performer: 
Dr. Asya Pereltsvaig, Dr. Volodymyr Dibrova, Dr. Roslyn Burns
Event description: 

On February 24, 2022, Russian military forces entered the sovereign nation of Ukraine leaving many around the world in shock and disbelief. Those familiar with Russian history, however, noticed echoes from the past.

We invite you to join our educational discussion panel where three linguists contextualize different aspects of the on-going conflict. Each panelist has expertise in different areas of Russian and Ukrainian history and how concepts related to language, ethnicity, and national identity shape political conflicts in the region.
Co-sponsored by the Department of Linguistics

After presentations, there will be Q & A.

online, free, open to the public with pre-registration

203-432-1072

Crash Course: Veteran Reflects on Training Ukrainian Volunteers for Battle

Event time: 
Tuesday, April 5, 2022 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
Horchow Hall HRCH, 103 (GM Room) See map
55 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

On April 5, International Security Studies will host a conversation with Adrian Bonenberger ’02, president of the Yale Veterans Association, and his wife, Iryna Solomko.
The pair will reflect on Bonenberger’s recent trip to Ukraine, where he was among a group of American combat veterans who gave a two-week crash course to volunteers of Ukraine’s Territorial Defense Forces. The American veterans—who organized and paid for the trip themselves—trained the volunteer fighters in small unit tactics and leadership.
Bonenberger served with the U.S. Army from 2005-2012 as an infantry officer, completing two tours in Afghanistan. He and his wife, a Ukrainian journalist who works for Voice of America, now live in Connecticut. Bonenberger is the editor of Yale Medicine Magazine.
Bonenberger will discuss his experience and take audience questions. James Hatch, a fellow veteran and a Yale undergrad enrolled in the university’s Eli Whitney Students program, will moderate.
Attendance is limited to members of the Yale campus community with Yale ID.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

Russia’s Influence-Building and Disruption in Greece: Religion as Soft and Sharp Power Tool

Event time: 
Wednesday, April 6, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
Online See map
Event description: 

Dr. Elizabeth H. Prodromou is a faculty member at The Fletcher School at Tufts University, where directs the Initiative on Religion, Law, and Diplomacy. She is non-resident Senior Fellow and Co-Chair of the Working Group on Christians and Religious Pluralism in the Middle East, at the Center for Religious Freedom at the Hudson Institute, and was non-resident Senior Fellow in National Security and the Middle East, at the Center for American Progress. She is a Co-President of Religions for Peace. Prodromou served as Vice Chair and Commissioner on the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (2004-2012) and was a member of the U.S. Secretary of State’s Religion & Foreign Policy Working Group (2011-2015).
Her research interests focus on geopolitics and religion, with particular focus on the Middle East, the Eastern Mediterranean, and Southeastern Europe. Her current research projects concentrate on cultural heritage and institutional religious freedom in Turkey and comparative context, as well as Eastern Orthodox Christianity and global public engagement. She is the faculty director for Fletcher’s executive education program for faith-based leadership. The author of multiple edited volumes and many publications in scholarly and policy journals, Prodromou is a frequent commentator and contributor in US and international media.
She holds a Ph.D. and an S.M. in political science from MIT, an M.A.L.D. in international relations from Fletcher, and a B.A. in history and international relations from Tufts University.

203-432-0061

Global Governance Debate

Event time: 
Thursday, March 31, 2022 - 12:00am to Friday, April 1, 2022 - 12:00am
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

“The Global Governance Debate is an annual event that brings together students from Yale University and the Universidad Católica de Valencia to discuss topics of international relations and cooperation.
This year’s debate topic is “Does democracy guarantee security and prosperity in times of global crisis?” Over the course of two days, students will debate this topic in teams of three. There will also be opportunities for students to meet each other and exchange!
Some preparation for the debate is required. Knowledge of Spanish is not required. The event will take place in person on Yale’s campus March 31 and April 1.
Please contact Pilar Asensio-Manrique with any questions: mariapilar.asensio-manrique@yale.edu
Additional Event Information: https://clais.macmillan.yale.edu/networks/yale-ucv

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

War in Ukraine

Event time: 
Friday, March 4, 2022 - 10:00am to 11:00am
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 101 (Auditorium) See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

The Jackson Institute for Global Affairs will host a panel discussion on the situation in Ukraine featuring the following panelists: Timothy Snyder, the Richard C. Levin Professor of History at Yale, Arne Westad, Elihu Professor of History and Global Affairs at Yale, and Nellie Petlick, a Jackson graduate student who previously served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in south-central Ukraine.
Attendance is limited to current members of the Yale campus community with a valid Yale ID and registration via EventBrite is required. *Please note that registration for this event is now full.
The event will be recorded; the video will be posted to our website jackson.yale.edu/virtual-events

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

The Parthenon Projective Disturbances: From Freud and Le Corbusier to Scully and Kahn, Autobiographically

Event time: 
Monday, March 7, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
Rosenkranz Hall RKZ, 241 See map
115 Prospect Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Encountering the Sacred Rock of the Athenian Acropolis has signaled for numerous historical personalities nodal processes of self-reflection conveyed autobiographically. Confronting the Parthenon emerges mostly as an enigmatic instance of unsettling revelation. Crucial, inspiring yet intricate such occurrences emerge through the announced four travelers of the title, further linked to more thinkers or artists of the 20th century, deeply affecting their respective fields and us.
Aristotelis Dimitrakopoulos (N.T.U.Athens ‘98, M.Arch. Yale ‘00) is an architect and urban designer, educator, design consultant, writer and theoretician with a multifaceted professional and academic experience in multiple countries and regions.
HYBRID EVENT
Due to campus COVID-19 restrictions only Yale ID holders will be permitted to attend in person. For those unable to join in person, the event will also be broadcast live online. Please register using the link below.

203-432-0061
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