Yale Postdoctoral Trainees

Inside the Deal: How the EU Got Brexit Done

Event time: 
Wednesday, November 29, 2023 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 202 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

As a close aide to Michel Barnier, Stefaan De Rynck (2006 Yale World Fellow) had a front row seat in the Brexit negotiations. In his book “Inside the Deal: How the EU Got Brexit Done”, De Rynck tells the EU’s side of the story and seeks to dispel some of the myths and spin that have become indelibly linked to the Brexit process. The conversation will be moderated by Jackson School Senior Lecturer Marnix Amand.

Co-sponsored by the Yale World Fellows Program and the MacMillan Center Council on European Studies.

Lunch will be provided. Please register in advance at https://tinyurl.com/yalebrexit

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
https://tinyurl.com/yalebrexit

203-432-1910

A conversation with Arman Tatoyan on the Artsakh Nagorno-Karabakh conflict

Event time: 
Friday, November 17, 2023 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

Arman Tatoyan holds his Master of Laws from University of Pennsylvania Law School; he obtained his LLM and Ph.D. from YSU, Department of Criminal Procedure and Criminalistics. Mr. Tatoyan is the former Human Rights Defender (Ombudsman) of Armenia and an Ad hoc Judge in the European Court of Human Rights. He served as the Deputy Minister of Justice of the Republic of Armenia and also has been the Deputy Representative of the Government of Armenia before the European Court of Human Rights. Mr. Tatoyan is also a permanent international advisor in the Council of Europe. He has been the advisor to the President of the Constitutional Court of Republic of Armenia and has been involved in different working groups for drafting laws and strategies for Armenia. He lectures in YSU and AUA, as well as in the Academy of Justice of Armenia.

Admission: 
Free

203-432-0061

Wenkai He-- Public Interest and State Legitimation: Early Modern England, Japan, and China

Event time: 
Friday, December 1, 2023 - 1:30pm to 2:50pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

How were state formation and early modern politics shaped by the state’s proclaimed obligation to domestic welfare? Drawing on a wide range of historical scholarship and primary sources, this book demonstrates that a public interest-based discourse of state legitimation was common to early modern England, Japan, and China. This normative platform served as a shared basis on which state and society could negotiate and collaborate over how to attain good governance through providing public goods such as famine relief and infrastructural facilities. The terms of state legitimacy opened a limited yet significant political space for the ruled. Through petitioning and protests, subordinates could demand that the state fulfil its publicly proclaimed duty and redress welfare grievances. Conflicts among diverse dimensions of public interest mobilized cross-regional and cross-sectoral collective petitions; justified by the same norms of state legitimacy, these petitions called for fundamental political reforms and transformed the nature of politics.

Wenkai He (Ph.D., MIT, 2007), is associate professor of Social Science at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Before joining the Division of Social Science of HKUST, he was An Wang postdoctoral fellow at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University. His research interests include comparative historical analysis in social science, political economy of state formation, and the political and economic history of China. His manuscript, The Paths toward the Modern Fiscal State: Early Modern England, Meiji Japan, and Qing China, is published by the Harvard University Press in 2013. His current research project, funded by Hong Kong’s Research Grants Council (RGC), is a comparative study about legitimation of state power through social policies such as plague prevention, famine relief and river works in early modern England and 18-19th century Japan and China.

Admission: 
Free

Populism in Power: Discourse & Performativity in SYRIZA and Donald Trump

Event time: 
Thursday, January 25, 2024 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Location: 
Virtual See map
Event description: 

Populism has a complicated relationship with power and democratic institutions. Conventional wisdom assumes that populists cannot last in power; they either become mainstream or turn authoritarian. Such hypotheses are arguably rooted in systematic, anti-populist theorizations, which view populism always as a threat to democracy, connecting it with demagogy and irresponsibility and understanding it as a force that belongs to the opposition.

This talk puts these claims under scrutiny, as they distract our attention from populism’s ‘essence’—the construction of collective identities in the name of ‘the people’ against ‘the elites’. Using a discursive and performative perspective, Giorgos Venizelos focuses on the charismatic function of populism to mobilize emotions and interpellate identification through antagonistic discourse and transgressive aesthetics. Such an account offers a rigorous yet flexible conceptualization that allows one to grasp the rhetorical and affective dynamics of populism in power.

Giorgos Venizelos is Fellow in Political Polarization at the Democracy Institute, Central European University. His research is situated at the intersections of contemporary political theory and comparative politics with a special focus on populism, anti-populism and discourse theory. He has published in journals including Political Studies, Constellations, Critical Sociology and Representation . He co-convenes the Populism Specialist Group of the Political Studies Association ( www.giorgosvenizelos.com).

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

The War and the Fate of Ukraine's Nadazov Greeks

Event time: 
Monday, November 13, 2023 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 202 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

One of the most underreported human catastrophes of Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine is the ongoing cultural and existential erasure of the country’s Nadazov Greek population, which, prior to the war, constituted the third-largest ethnic group (after Ukrainians and Russians) in the bitterly contested Donetsk region. Most of these Greeks were concentrated in and around the city of Mariupol, which they founded after Catherine the Great had resettled them from their ancient homeland of Crimea in 1778. This imperial precedent—and the cultural prejudice used to justify its expedience—would persist. The Soviet policy of mass persecution of Greeks, which included deportations, executions, and bans on their language and culture, started with the NKVD’s so-called “Greek Operation” under Stalin in 1937 and continued for many years thereafter. For today’s Nadazov Greeks, who come from a region of Ukraine that has been militarized since 2014 and much of which was effectively destroyed in some of the heaviest fighting of 2022, Russia’s war and occupation now pose a question of both cultural preservation and immediate survival.

Tetiana (Tatiana) Liubchenko is an associate professor of Greek Linguistics at Kyiv National Linguistic University (Ukraine). She obtained her undergraduate degree in Philology (English language and literature, Modern Greek) from Mariupol State University in 2000 and received her PhD in Greek Philology from the Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv in 2009. She has published over 50 articles in various subfields of linguistics. Tetiana was head of the Modern Greek and Translation Studies section at Kyiv National Linguistic University. She also served as an expert at the Hennadi Udovenko Diplomatic Academy of Ukraine through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine; an expert at the Institute of Education Content Modernization through the Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine, which supervised the publication of school textbooks under state order; and she was head of the All-Ukrainian School Olympiad in Greek Language and Literature. As a representative of the Greek population of Ukraine, she has been participating in the organization of numerous international events at the diplomatic level for more than 25 years. With the outbreak of full-scale war in Ukraine, she moved to Greece, where she works as a translator and interpreter and serves as a representative of the Union of the Greeks of Ukraine in Greece, a non-profit organization. Her most recent projects include translating and participating in a 2023 documentary about the Ukrainians and Greeks of Ukraine who now live in Greece as a result of the war (part of the “Thessaloniki The Human Histories” TV series). She is also working on launching a website dedicated to the preservation of the legacy of Ukraine’s Nadazov Greeks.

Admission: 
Free

Conversation with Natalia Gavrilita, former Prime Minister of Moldova

Event time: 
Thursday, October 26, 2023 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Location: 
Horchow Hall HRCH, 103 (GM Room) See map
55 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Natalia Gavrilița
Event description: 

The Jackson School of Global Affairs will host a conversation with Natalia Gavrilița, former prime minister of Moldova, on leadership in crisis and the future of Eastern Europe and the EU.

The conversation will be moderated by Jackson Senior Fellow Alix Zwane.

Gavrilița assumed office as the 15th prime minister, and third woman prime minister, of Moldova on August 6, 2021 and left office on February 16, 2023. Gavrilița has had a long history in economics and politics. Earlier in her career, Gavrilița served as the head of the Department for Economic Forecasts and Development Programs in the Ministry of Economy and Infrastructure. She has also worked within the State Chancellery, for Oxford Policy Management, and the Ministry of Education. Gavrilița was also the executive director of the World Bank’s Education Reform Project.

In 2019, Gavrilița served as the minister of finance for Moldova. In 2021, Gavrilița was nominated by president of Moldova Maia Sandu for the position of prime minister.

Gavrilița graduated from Moldova State University with a bachelor’s degree in international law. She also earned a master’s degree in public policy from Harvard University.

The talk is open to the Yale campus community.

Admission: 
Free

Student Guide Tour: “In a New Light: Paintings from the Yale Center for British Art”

Event time: 
Saturday, November 4, 2023 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
Yale University Art Gallery YUAG See map
1111 Chapel Street
New Haven, CT 06510
Event description: 

Join a YCBA student guide for a tour of In a New Light: Paintings from the Yale Center for British Art.

Open configuration options
While the Yale Center for British Art (YCBA) is closed for building conservation, more than fifty major collection works, spanning four centuries of British landscape and portraiture traditions, are on view at the Yale University Art Gallery. Join our student guides to learn more about the exhibition, as well as architecture, collection, and history of the YCBA.

Admission: 
Free
No registration is required; check in at the Information Desk in the Gallery lobby. Space is limited. For the Gallery's current vaccination and mask requirements, visit artgallery.yale.edu/hours-and-directions.

203-432-2800

Student Guide Tour: “In a New Light: Paintings from the Yale Center for British Art”

Event time: 
Saturday, October 28, 2023 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
Yale University Art Gallery YUAG See map
1111 Chapel Street
New Haven, CT 06510
Event description: 

Join a YCBA student guide for a tour of In a New Light: Paintings from the Yale Center for British Art.

Open configuration options
While the Yale Center for British Art (YCBA) is closed for building conservation, more than fifty major collection works, spanning four centuries of British landscape and portraiture traditions, are on view at the Yale University Art Gallery. Join our student guides to learn more about the exhibition, as well as architecture, collection, and history of the YCBA.

Admission: 
Free
No registration is required; check in at the Information Desk in the Gallery lobby. Space is limited. For the Gallery's current vaccination and mask requirements, visit artgallery.yale.edu/hours-and-directions.

203-432-2800

Getting Russia Right: A Conversation with Tom Graham

Event time: 
Monday, October 30, 2023 - 5:30pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 101 (Auditorium) See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Event description: 

The Brady-Johnson Program in Grand Strategy hosts Russia expert Tom Graham for a frank discussion on US-Russia relations. His new book, Getting Russia Right, identifies the blind spots that have prevented Washington from seeing Russia as it really is and from crafting a policy to advance American interests without provoking an aggressive Russian response. 

A former Jackson School Senior Fellow and Foreign Service officer, Graham is now a managing director at Kissinger Associates, Inc., where he focuses on Russian and Eurasian affairs. He was Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Russia on the National Security Council staff from 2004 to 2007 and Director for Russian Affairs on that staff from 2002 to 2004. From 2001 to 2002, he served as the Associate Director of the Policy Planning Staff of the Department of State. He co-founded the Russian Studies Project at Yale.

Arne Westad, Elihu Professor of History and Global Affairs, and Director of International Security Studies and the Brady-Johnson Program in Grand Strategy, will moderate.

Free and open to the Yale community.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

PRFDHR Seminar: AI, Digital Identities, Biometrics, Blockchain: How the Use of Technology is Changing Migration Globally, Dr. Raphaela Schweiger

Event time: 
Thursday, October 26, 2023 - 4:00pm to 5:15pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Raphaela Schweiger, Yale University - World Fellow
Event description: 

The seminar led by Dr. Raphaela Schweiger will delve into the profound impacts of digitalization and technological advancements on migration and refugee policies. In a world shaped by rapid technological change, this seminar offers an exploration of the evolving landscape, both globally and in some specific cases in Africa, the Middle East, Europe and North America. Technology has already begun reshaping the experiences of migrants, refugees, and those on the move. From AI-powered virtual psychotherapy in refugee camps to blockchain-based solutions for identity verification, the migration management field is undergoing a profound evolution. The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated these digitalization processes, demanding swift policy adaptation. The seminar will investigate the wide-reaching effects of digital connectivity, from online learning platforms empowering refugees to the creation of new information ecosystems in the migration space. AI, biometrics, and blockchain are driving innovations in critical migration areas, from predicting migration patterns to transforming asylum processes. But this transformation isn’t without its challenges. As technology intersects with geopolitical shifts, we must grapple with questions of privacy, data access, and human rights. Vulnerabilities and discrimination in the migration space demand our attention.

Raphaela Schweiger is a 2023 Yale World Fellow and the Director of the Migration Program at the Robert Bosch Stiftung. Her portfolio includes global governance of migration, climate mobility, the future of protection of refugees and migrants, and the intersection between technological change and migration. She also works on the intersection of migration with other global issues, such as climate change, peace and conflict, inequalities, and inclusive societies, and has published widely on these issues. Raphaela is a board member of the Doris Wuppermann Foundation, a German foundation, focusing on supporting youth-led initiatives fostering democracy and civic participation. She holds a PhD from the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, a Political Science and Law degree from the University of Munich, an International Studies/Peace and Conflict Studies from the Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, the Technical University Darmstadt and the University Complutense de Madrid.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
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