Alumni

PRFDHR and ESC Film: Malta Calling - Movie Screening and Q&A with film director Mauro Mondello

Event time: 
Thursday, October 13, 2022 - 3:00pm to 4:45pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Mauro Mondello - freelance reporter, war correspondent and documentary filmmaker
Event description: 

Movie screening Thursday, October 13th, 2022 (in-person; 30mn) followed immediately by Q&A session (75mn).

Malta, a tiny island-state in the Mediterranean Sea, has been a member of the European Union since January 1st, 2004, and a member of the Schengen area since December 21st, 2007. Since then Malta has shifted to become a country of immigration and has seemingly provided a golden gateway for the boatloads of people that escape the African shores in search of a better way of life. In the meanwhile, the dynamics of ethnic and race relations in the island have grown to be synonymous with migration. Within social discourse, policy and research, the emphasis is now on understanding and combatting racial discrimination. The exponential growth of anti-migrant movements in Malta is a phenomenon of large proportions, with dozens of groups on social networks and three ultra-nationalist parties. The Maltese government has been accused several times for the conditions of the reception centers where asylum seekers are hosted. While Malta continues to have no long-term integration strategy targeting refugees, they will remain the most vulnerable and marginalised group in the country, experiencing isolation and a very low level of interaction with Maltese people. ‘Malta Calling’ looks at how migration has influenced Maltese political and social discourse, becoming somehow a laboratory of populism for the whole European continent. The documentary has won the Best short documentary at Stockholm City Film Festival, Boden Film Festival, and Short Film Factory Festival.

MAURO MONDELLO is a freelance reporter, war correspondent and documentary filmmaker. In the last eight months he has been reporting from Ukraine for several international news outlets. His work mainly focuses on geopolitics, war, human rights and migration, with a special interest on the areas of Eastern Europe, Russia, the Caucasus and the Arab world, and a preference for the long-form reportage format. He has published stories and reportages for The Guardian, Die Zeit, Newlines Magazine, Sueddeutsche Zeitung, Expresso, La Stampa, La Repubblica, Avvenire, Courrier International, among others. He was selected in 2020 for the Maurice Greenberg World Fellows Program at Yale University.

Speaker:
Mauro Mondello - freelance reporter, war correspondent and documentary filmmaker
Moderator:
Lucio Gussetti - EU Visiting Fellow, European Studies Council, MacMillan Center

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

The Far Right in Greece and the Law

Event time: 
Wednesday, October 12, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
Rosenkranz Hall RKZ, 202 See map
115 Prospect Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Natalie Alikiviadou
Event description: 

Natalie Alkiviadou is Senior Research Fellow at Danish think-tank Justitia. Her research focuses on free speech, ‘hate speech’ and the far-right with 2 Routledge monographs and a range of peer-reviewed articles on the themes.
This book critically evaluates the rise of the far-right in Greece, detailing the legal context in which to understand both the emergence of Golden Dawn, the far-right’s largest grouping, and the 2020 court decision, in which it was deemed to be a criminal organisation.
Golden Dawn was a political party which, for years, also functioned as a violent subculture movement, with limited to no interference by the state. This book sets out the background to its rise in Greece, tracing its development from the post-Junta era. At the same time, the book provides an assessment of the legal framework within which the far-right has operated, and the legal tools available to tackle it – including criminal law, non-discrimination law, the laws governing political parties and the public order framework, and the country’s international and European obligations. Golden Dawn functioned as both a political party and violent entity until its leadership and parliamentary members were found guilty of leading and participating in a criminal organisation. This book demonstrates that the state of impunity in which Golden Dawn’s violent hit squads functioned was both a facilitating factor for its rise, and potentially for its demise, as the group potentially felt untouchable. And its attention to how Greek Law has tackled, and failed to tackle, Golden Dawn offers a timely and more generally useful assessment of how legislation, courts and policies can best challenge the far-right.
This book will be of interest to those teaching and studying in law and politics, as well as more others, concerned with the rise of the far right and violent organizations, especially in Europe.

203-432-0061

Henry L. Stimson Lectures on World Affairs: Why Storytelling Works: Narrative as Method

Event time: 
Friday, September 30, 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, Front Lawn See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Mary Sarotte
Event description: 

Mary Elise Sarotte is the inaugural holder of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Distinguished Professorship of Historical Studies at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). Sarotte earned her AB in History and Science at Harvard and her PhD in History at Yale University. She is the author or editor of six books, including most recently ‘Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate’, along with ‘The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall’ and ‘1989: The Struggle to Create Post-Cold War Europe’, both of which were selected as Financial Times Books of the Year, among other distinctions and awards. Following graduate school, Sarotte served as a White House Fellow, then joined the faculty of the University of Cambridge, where she received tenure before accepting an offer to return to the United States and teach at the University of Southern California. Sarotte is a former Humboldt Scholar, a former member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, an associate at Harvard University’s Center for European Studies, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.
Dr. Sarotte will deliver three lectures this year related to her book ‘Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate’.
The Stimson Lecture Series is held in honor of Henry L. Stimson, Yale College 1889, an attorney and statesman whose government service culminated with his tenure as secretary of war during World War II. Since 1998, the MacMillan Center and the Yale University Press have collaborated to bring distinguished diplomats and foreign policy experts to the Center to lecture on their books that are published by the Yale Press.

203-432-0061

Henry L. Stimson Lectures on World Affairs: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate

Event time: 
Thursday, September 29, 2022 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 101 (Auditorium) See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Mary Sarotte
Event description: 

Mary Elise Sarotte is the inaugural holder of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Distinguished Professorship of Historical Studies at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). Sarotte earned her AB in History and Science at Harvard and her PhD in History at Yale University. She is the author or editor of six books, including most recently ‘Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate’, along with ‘The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall’ and ‘1989: The Struggle to Create Post-Cold War Europe’, both of which were selected as Financial Times Books of the Year, among other distinctions and awards. Following graduate school, Sarotte served as a White House Fellow, then joined the faculty of the University of Cambridge, where she received tenure before accepting an offer to return to the United States and teach at the University of Southern California. Sarotte is a former Humboldt Scholar, a former member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, an associate at Harvard University’s Center for European Studies, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.
Dr. Sarotte will deliver three lectures this year related to her book ‘Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate’. This event will be followed by a small reception.
The Stimson Lecture Series is held in honor of Henry L. Stimson, Yale College 1889, an attorney and statesman whose government service culminated with his tenure as secretary of war during World War II. Since 1998, the MacMillan Center and the Yale University Press have collaborated to bring distinguished diplomats and foreign policy experts to the Center to lecture on their books that are published by the Yale Press.

203-432-0061

Henry L. Stimson Lectures on World Affairs: From How to Why: The Post-Cold War Punctuational Moment and Its Legacy

Event time: 
Wednesday, September 28, 2022 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 101 (Auditorium) See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Mary Sarotte
Event description: 

Mary Elise Sarotte is the inaugural holder of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Distinguished Professorship of Historical Studies at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). Sarotte earned her AB in History and Science at Harvard and her PhD in History at Yale University. She is the author or editor of six books, including most recently ‘Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate’, along with ‘The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall’ and ‘1989: The Struggle to Create Post-Cold War Europe’, both of which were selected as Financial Times Books of the Year, among other distinctions and awards. Following graduate school, Sarotte served as a White House Fellow, then joined the faculty of the University of Cambridge, where she received tenure before accepting an offer to return to the United States and teach at the University of Southern California. Sarotte is a former Humboldt Scholar, a former member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, an associate at Harvard University’s Center for European Studies, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.
Dr. Sarotte will deliver three lectures this year related to her book ‘Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate’.
The Stimson Lecture Series is held in honor of Henry L. Stimson, Yale College 1889, an attorney and statesman whose government service culminated with his tenure as secretary of war during World War II. Since 1998, the MacMillan Center and the Yale University Press have collaborated to bring distinguished diplomats and foreign policy experts to the Center to lecture on their books that are published by the Yale Press.

203-432-0061

Exhibition Curators' Talk: "Subjects and Objects: Slavic Collections at Yale, 1896–2022"

Event time: 
Tuesday, September 13, 2022 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Sterling Memorial Library SML, Lecture Hall See map
120 High Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Curators: Anna Arays and Liliya Dashevski,
Event description: 

Please join us to celebrate the opening of “Subjects and Objects: Slavic Collections at Yale, 1896–2022,” which is on view in the Hanke Exhibition Gallery, Sterling Memorial Library.
Curators Anna Arays and Liliya Dashevski will discuss their exhibition and will be available for questions and conversation over light refreshments afterward.
No registration is necessary.
Note: Please see the library’s COVID updates to current public health protocols: https://library.yale.edu/news/covid-library-updates

Admission: 
Free

203-432-1072

Windham-Campbell Festival: Choral Performance: Intimate Strangers

Event time: 
Tuesday, September 20, 2022 - 6:00pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library BRBL, Mezzanine See map
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Emmanuel Iduma, Sara Serpa
Event description: 

A collaboration between Portuguese vocalist-composer Sara Serpa and Nigerian writer Emmanuel Iduma, drawing inspiration from Iduma’s book, A Stranger’s Pose, a unique blend of travelogue, musings and poetry. In a combination of music, text, image, and field recordings collected by Iduma during his travels, Intimate Strangers explores such themes as of movement, home, grief, absence, and desire in what Iduma calls “an atlas of a borderless world.”

Admission: 
Free
All festival events are free and open to the public. Audience members must be vaccinated and boosted and should be prepared to show proof of vaccination. Masks will be required at most indoor events.

PRFDHR Seminar: Ordinary People Under Extreme Life Conditions: Internal and External Forced Displacement from War-Torn Territories in Ukraine, Professor Oksana Mikheieva

Event time: 
Tuesday, October 4, 2022 - 12:30pm to 1:45pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Oksana Mikheieva, European University Viadrina (Frankfurt) and Ukrainian Catholic University (Lviv) - Departments of Sociology
Event description: 

The start of Russian aggression against Ukraine in 2014 led to the temporary occupation of the Crimea peninsula and parts of Donetsk and Luhansk region. With the beginning of Russian aggression more than 2 million people have left the uncontrolled territories of Ukraine and were forced to move both to other parts of Ukraine and beyond its borders. According to the Ministry of Social Policy, after 2015 and before the full-scale Russian invasion began on 24 February 2022, the number of registered internally displaced persons (IDPs) was relatively stable at around 1.5 million. Residents of war-torn territories have also been fleeing the country since 2014. As of December 2015, in the countries that have common borders with Ukraine, such as Russia, Belarus, Poland, Slovakia, Hungary, Moldova, there were 388,690 Ukrainians seeking refuge, and 730,100 Ukrainians seeking other forms of legal stay in the aforementioned countries. The estimated population of the occupied territories of Donetsk and Luhansk regions is 3.7 million. These are mostly people who formally remain the citizens of Ukraine.

At this stage of the war started in 2014, Ukraine was deprived of control over part of its state borders, facing the problem of the so-called ‘lines of demarcation’ occurring instead in the Donetsk and Luhansk areas and Crimea. Having turned the internal territories into the actual border areas, these demarcation lines changed the everyday life of the average citizens of Ukraine. All of this became a new reality for ordinary people who were involved to varying degrees in this conflict.

Professor Mikheieva will talk about how the Russian aggression of 2014 has changed people’s daily lives in Ukraine, what challenges Ukrainian society has encountered, and what problems people who were forced to leave their homes have faced. The study of the everyday experience of IDPs is based on a series of semi-structured in-depth interviews conducted by Professor Mikheieva between 2014 and 2018 (over 300 interviews). She will also focus on the specifics of current forced migration inside and outside of Ukraine caused by Russia’s full-fledged aggression against Ukraine in 2022.

Professor Oksana Mikheieva is a DAAD Professor at the European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), Germany. She is also Professor of Sociology at the Ukrainian Catholic University (Lviv). In the spring semesters of 2020 and 2022 she was visiting lecturer at the Jagiellonian University (Krakow, Poland).  She has also participated in more than 20 sociological research projects, in 10 of which she was a principal investigator. Mikheieva has over twenty years of research and teaching experience. She researches a wide range of areas, including the historical aspects of deviant and delinquent behavior, urban studies, paramilitary motivations, forced displacement, migration. In 2016 she was a Visiting Professor in Ukraine European Dialogue at the Institute for Human Science (Vienna), and in 2015 she was Eugene and Daymel Shklar Research Fellow Harvard University, Ukrainian Research Institute.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

PRFDHR Seminar: Refuge: How the State Shapes Human Potential, Professor Heba Gowayed

Event time: 
Tuesday, September 20, 2022 - 4:00pm to 5:15pm
Location: 
Henry R. Luce Hall LUCE, 203 See map
34 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Speaker/Performer: 
Heba Gowayed, Boston University - Department of Sociology
Event description: 

Drawing on a global and comparative ethnography, this presentation explores how Syrian men and women seeking refuge in a moment of unprecedented global displacement are received by countries of resettlement and asylum—the U.S., Canada, and Germany. It shows that human capital, typically examined as the skills immigrants bring with them that shape their potential, is actually created, transformed, or destroyed by receiving states’ incorporation policies. Since these policies derive from historically informed and unequal approaches to social welfare, refugees’ experiences raise a mirror to how states (re)produce inequality.
Heba Gowayed is the Moorman-Simon Assistant Professor of Sociology at Boston University.
Her research, which is global and comparative, examines how low-income people traverse social services, immigration laws, and their associated bureaucracies, while grappling with gender and racial inequalities. Her writing has appeared in academic outlets as well as in public outlets including Slate, Al Jazeera English, The New Humanitarian, and Teen Vogue.
Sponsored By: Program on Refugees, Forced Displacement, and Humanitarian Responses (PRFDHR) and the Yale Center of Race, Indigeneity, and Transnational Migration (RITM)

Admission: 
Free but register in advance

Yale Library Book Talk: Samuel Moyn

Event time: 
Wednesday, May 4, 2022 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Online See map
Speaker/Performer: 
Samuel Moyn, Henry R. Luce Professor of Jurisprudence at Yale Law School and Professor of History; Bruce Ackerman, Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science
Event description: 

Samuel Moyn will discuss his new book “Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War”
Yale Law School and History Department Professor Samuel Moyn’s new book asks a troubling but urgent question: What if efforts to make war more ethical—-to ban torture and limit civilian casualties—-have only shored up the military enterprise and made it sturdier? Professor Moyn will be in discussion with Bruce Ackerman, Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science.

Admission: 
Free but register in advance
anna.arays@yale.edu

203-432-1072
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